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View Full Version : Limitations of Upright Stance?



Thunderduck
05-06-2005, 01:52 AM
I'm still a beginner, but at the moment I'm most comfortable with a very upright stance... people who have seen me play compare my stance to Willie Mosconi because I'm so high above the cue. I've heard many comments about upright stances such as:

"Back then players used upright stances but to be competitive at modern pool you can't do that anymore, it's outdated."

"Players who use a very upright stance are forced to use only closed bridges, open bridges wont work."

"It's harder for an upright player to develop a good stroke."

Are any of these statements true? If I want to change to a lower stance in later years, will it be hard for me to switch over?

Thanks!

Tduck

aco76
05-06-2005, 05:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Thunderduck:</font><hr> "Back then players used upright stances but to be competitive at modern pool you can't do that anymore, it's outdated."
<hr /></blockquote>

I'm sure there are a few pro players who stand that way and are successful. Buddy Hall?


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Thunderduck:</font><hr>
"Players who use a very upright stance are forced to use only closed bridges, open bridges wont work."
<hr /></blockquote>

They would work, but I think it would be more natural to use more closed bridges for upright stances. Don't have a proof for that, but all 3C players use closed bridges. In fact it's almost all they use, despite their shots being mostly topspin. Hopefully there are 3C players here who could explain it better.


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Thunderduck:</font><hr>
"It's harder for an upright player to develop a good stroke."
<hr /></blockquote>

Not true. For very low stances such as mine, one needs more discipline actually. Unwanted head movement is more likely to occur. Also it is more difficult to give yourself enough room to shoot freely. Some never learn and feel cramped. More strain on your back and legs. You pay the price for that super view. Upright stances are a little more forgiving IMO.


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Thunderduck:</font><hr>
Are any of these statements true? If I want to change to a lower stance in later years, will it be hard for me to switch over?
<hr /></blockquote>

None are true. Switching is not easy, especially after years of using the same technique. Switching from 3C style to very low snooker'ish style right away might feel horrible. One would need a few steps inbetween I suppose.

ceebee
05-06-2005, 05:46 AM
One thing to remember about changing any major part of your stroking process, is that it will take time for your proficiency level to be constant. Someone on the CCB has a signature that "Unlearning is harder than learning", that is so true.

I would venture to say that severe cutshots &amp; hard hit shots will be the easiest test for your new, lower stance. It will all depend on your ability to see the line of flight.

Good Luck

Rod
05-06-2005, 08:50 AM
That's what they are, just comments. There has been, always will be bogus statements regarding certain aspects of pool. Not that it matters but where did they get this, in a dream?

Rod

Scott Lee
05-06-2005, 09:54 AM
Thunderduck...Nope, none of them are true, just like the others said! Stance height is a matter of personal preference, unless the shot demands a low stance, such as stretching out over the table to reach a long shot.

Scott Lee

Thunderduck
05-08-2005, 02:18 PM
the classification of a lower stance being more "modern" might reflect the idea that the prevalent game these days is 9 ball .Mosconi played straight pool&lt;14.1&gt; and rarely had to pocket a ball in what would be considered a "hard" shot. Opinions?

Cane
05-08-2005, 07:38 PM
Maybe Mr. Mosconi never had to pocket hard shots because he played superb position. I don't think the upright stance is any more prevalant in any one game than it is another. 14.1 is a VERY precision game, so to say that the game doesn't involve hard shots is erroneous.

In any case, I agree with everyone else that's commented on this. It's personal preference, or physical limitation. Whether it's high, low or in between, set up so that you have what YOU consider to be the best view of the shot at hand. For me, if I get too low, I lose depth. If I get too high, I lose the perception of my target line. I play with my chin about 3-4" above the cue. Fairly low, but much more upright than many players.

Later,
Bob