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Fred Agnir
05-09-2005, 08:02 AM
With the ability to setup the 9' Diamond Smart Table, it is now viable to have a national tournament held on 9' tables. The issue before is the difficulty of quickly setting up and breaking down 3-piece slate tables. The one-piece slate of the Smart Tables and the new leveling system puts those issues to be.

So, if a national open amateur tournament using the known Master list (BCA, VNEA) was held, and it was open to all current league systems, would that be of interest to enough people?

Should some kind of league system be set up first before putting together a National Amateur 9' Table Championship? Or, should a National Amateur 9' Table Championship be setup first and simply make it available for anyone considering there is already a recognized Masters List? I'm with having the National tournament first and use the existing league structure as a base for players.

Would this be of interest to the league players and other amateurs?

Fred

Rich R.
05-09-2005, 08:37 AM
Fred, the U.S. Amateur Championship, which is run the APA but open to non-APA members, is played on 9' tables. It draws a very strong field from across the country.

http://www.poolplayers.com/usam.html

Fred Agnir
05-09-2005, 09:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> Fred, the U.S. Amateur Championship, which is run the APA but open to non-APA members, is played on 9' tables. It draws a very strong field from across the country.

http://www.poolplayers.com/usam.html <hr /></blockquote>I am amazed this event can draw anyone considering it has no cash payout.

So, I'll amend the statement to say that although there is a 9' table National Championship run by the APA, there is currently no 9' Table National Championship for amateurs that awards cash.

Fred

Rich R.
05-09-2005, 10:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> I am amazed this event can draw anyone considering it has no cash payout.<hr /></blockquote>
I am guessing they stay away from a cash prize, because it is suppose to be an amateur event. However, the main prize of paid travel, lodging &amp; entry fees into a 2006 pro event, could be a substantial prize.

At one time, the prize was specified as paid entry into the U.S. Open. As you know, the entry fee for that event is $500. Together with travel and lodging, that is not a bad prize for an amateur. It is not great, but substantial.

Also, many of the players who participate in the U.S. Amateur Championships have already won qualifiers, which paid for the travel and entry into the main tournament.

Oh, let's not forget the additional prizes of a trophy, jacket and APA membership. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif