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BlindPlayer
05-12-2005, 03:22 PM
I'm interested in learning what other pre-match routines are being used out there other than these:


1) Checking My Alignment - Place 2 OBs 3' or 4' away aligned horizontally to the line of travel a.k.a. perpendicular. If I can hit the CB such that the 2 OBs split apart evenly then all is coming together for me. If not I must find and correct the cause.

Another is to place an OB on the end rail and from 6' or 7' distance stroke the CB against the OB and see if the CB comes straight back 'atcha' (or very very close to it).

Another is to place the CB a diamond's (DsL)length from the end rail the OB a DsL from the CB lined up as a straight in shot to the opposite corner pocket. If I can make a straight in shot down the center of the pocket that far away pretty much aimed.

I (almost always remember to ) go through these drills before a match so corrections are made before it's too late. Making corrects of this nature after the match starts is too late - but that's what some players do.

2) Checking Each Table Used in a Tourney - I check the alignment of the side rails passed the side pocket. Sometimes they're are NOT aligned which (of course) means that you can make a shot down the rail passed the side pocket in one direction but not the other.

In an 8 ball match in '93 my opponent gave me a weak break (no balls pocketed). I chose solids but stripes blocked both corner pockets at the foot rail. All the solids had to be pocketed in the corner pockets at the head rail and side pockets. One shot had to pass the side pocket from the 'kitchen' to the head rail corner pocket. Getting shape behind my balls in the 'kitchen' was a neat challenge. It was memorably the best runnout I've ever had.

3) Checking the Rails - Try bank shots on ALL 6 rails...looking for consistency. Sometimes there's a dead rail or one has just been replaced (just one) and it responds different than the other 5. It's nice to know these things ahead of time. I try soft, medium and medium-hard speeds on each rail - each table is different. If one wins and moves on to another table for the next set in a tourney - the table checks start all over again.

4) Checking Pockets - I take two balls and place them in the jaws of the pocket to check how tight/loose the pockets are and check the angle of the pocket cut. Some angle cuts mean more balls will 'jaw' in the pocket and balls must therefore be pretty much dead center and cheating the pocket then takes on a whole new meaning and I may not try it depending on distance of OB from the pocket.

5) Checking Drift - I 'slow roll' a ball towards and into each corner pocket to see if it drifts any. Sometimes a shape shot will call for a "slow roll" but if one of the quadrants of the table has a drift to it I will avoid that scenerio. Have to use medium speed or better to make sure the OB stays true.

ANY OTHER THOUGHTS?

Popcorn
05-12-2005, 04:29 PM
Other then checking out the equipment, I don't do any of that stuff, I just play. Just prier to beginning a match your not going to teach yourself anything, you will either play well or you won't. You can even undermined your confidence if you do what you are describing and things don't go well. I see guys trying to warm up before a match trying to run 9-ball racks and missing. They go into the match almost in a panic, "OH MY GOD, I can't make a ball", not a very good mind set. I never even shoot a tough shot warming up, just lots of positive input. Once you begin to play the match you go on to auto pilot anyway and don't think about fundamentals and the such, that is reserved for your practice sessions. Practice play and real play are two different things.

bustah360
05-12-2005, 05:15 PM
the most you could really do for routine is check the rolls on the table. depending on the cloth it might roll slower or faster than what you're used to. you can also shoot a couple of text-book banks and see how the rails are, that way you can control the ball speed a bit better off of them. other than that I just practice straight shots from the rail and try to warm a good stroke up.

Cane
05-12-2005, 06:29 PM
All I do is check the tables out then I just get quite for awhile... get off to myself if possible, clean my already clean cues, enjoy a good glass of ice water and then "get it on". Earlier in the day, I'll watch my new "Tape of Me" shooting pool, and that's about it. I spend more time just getting my head together and getting in a "play mode" than anything else.

Later,
Bob

SplinterHands
05-13-2005, 05:46 AM
I pay attention to the speed of the cloth and how the rails bank. Paying too much attention to the things you mentioned sounds like the beginnings of excuses. This may not be you, but we all know the players who blame everything but their crooked stroke for losing.

wolfdancer
05-13-2005, 08:30 AM
I like to start off with a Tangeruay & Tonic...or two.
Great for the nerves.....

Rod
05-13-2005, 09:03 AM
ANY OTHER THOUGHTS?

Well yes, If you go through this everytime, you must give the TD or your opponent fits. What if everyone did this? Makes for a long boring tournament.

Rod

Billy_Bob
05-13-2005, 09:17 AM
I do best if I first shoot a few racks at home on my tight pockets table, then get to tournament about an hour early.

Then do progressive straight in shots. Progressive cut shots. Common cut shots. Draw shots. And follow shots. Then shoot in a rack and see if I'm having trouble with particular shots - if so practice those shots.

Then about 15 minutes before tournament starts, do nothing - rest. Watch late arriving players scramble to get at a table to warm-up.

Tom_In_Cincy
05-13-2005, 09:58 AM
Tap! Tap!

Scott Lee
05-13-2005, 10:42 AM
Popcorn...I agree with you! A negative mindset before you even play your match, is tough to overcome! Often that negative thought comes from fearing who your opponent is!
I was thinking, with today's easy technology, your idea of an 'edited' tape/dvd of a player's successful shooting, would work really well. You could be sitting in your chair, before your match, watching yourself pocket balls over and over. That would serve to eliminate a lot of negative thought, I would think! Kind of like the players we see listening to whatever (music, positive affirmation tapes, etc) on headphones, as they wait to play!

Scott Lee

Scott Lee
05-13-2005, 10:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> I like to start off with a Tangeruay &amp; Tonic...or two.
Great for the nerves..... <hr /></blockquote>

...or perhaps a slice of Dominatrix, with a twist? LOL

Scott /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Stretch
05-13-2005, 12:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> ANY OTHER THOUGHTS?

Well yes, If you go through this everytime, you must give the TD or your opponent fits. What if everyone did this? Makes for a long boring tournament.

Rod
<hr /></blockquote>

Even the ghost would complain. St.

Voodoo Daddy
05-13-2005, 12:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Other then checking out the equipment, I don't do any of that stuff, I just play. Just prier to beginning a match your not going to teach yourself anything, you will either play well or you won't. You can even undermined your confidence if you do what you are describing and things don't go well. I see guys trying to warm up before a match trying to run 9-ball racks and missing. They go into the match almost in a panic, "OH MY GOD, I can't make a ball", not a very good mind set. I never even shoot a tough shot warming up, just lots of positive input. Once you begin to play the match you go on to auto pilot anyway and don't think about fundamentals and the such, that is reserved for your practice sessions. Practice play and real play are two different things. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue">Old school...the best way. Popcorn strikes again!! I dont like to hit balls before a match or tournament, I like to go back to the bug and listen to some "Voodoo Mood Music", it puts me in that "place", HAHAHAHAHA!!</font color>