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bustah360
05-19-2005, 05:58 AM
I have a picture of this particular joint pin, its from capone and I just wanted to identify it. I wanted to see if anyone knew how and why this contributes to the soft natural hit his cues give. Would this be a radial pin? I noticed the lil hole at the top of the pin too, does this do anything?

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/kdiaz01/jtshfts.jpg

Billy_Bob
05-19-2005, 07:06 AM
This may help...

Different joints...
http://www.predatorcues.com/english/jointtypes.htm

SpiderMan
05-19-2005, 07:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bustah360:</font><hr> I have a picture of this particular joint pin, its from capone and I just wanted to identify it. I wanted to see if anyone knew how and why this contributes to the soft natural hit his cues give. Would this be a radial pin? I noticed the lil hole at the top of the pin too, does this do anything?

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/kdiaz01/jtshfts.jpg <hr /></blockquote>

The hole in the top of the pin may be an artifact from a center drilling for lathe work. Some cuemakers adorn this hole with "belly-button jewelry". Bill Schick's joint pins have a little piece of Ivory with his initial carved in it.

SpiderMan

bustah360
05-19-2005, 08:43 AM
Is it a radial pin though? Sometimes I'll see a pin like that with more threads going closer to the top. More or less threads doesn't really matter right?

Deeman2
05-19-2005, 09:04 AM
<font color="blue">As Spiderman said, the hole at the end is the place where the live center supported the work during turning and threading. </font color> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote bustah360:</font><hr> Is it a radial pin though? Sometimes I'll see a pin like that with more threads going closer to the top. <font color="blue">The extension of non-threaded is simply a guide to allow easier engagement of the threads and helps prevent cross threading. /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif </font color> More or less threads doesn't really matter right? <font color="blue"> Only in the sense that more threads per inch increase the tightness of the bond between the joints and a longer screw is more secure and will hold better than one with less overall threads. If they are too few (per inch), your cue would be coming loose a lot. If there were very few total, the joint would be prone to stripping the threads. However, there is not a lot of force in that direction which allows a lot of the "quick connect threads to work (I don't care for them). My wife has a Cue tech prone to coming loose a couple of times a night. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

The nice hit is probably a combination of things but the wood to wood joint would help. Just a note, my favorite thing about my Schon is the way the threads tighten up the last full turn. Makes a really secure joint and I've never had it come loose.

Good luck...or as Fred would say, Hope that helps /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

Deeman

tateuts
05-19-2005, 09:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bustah360:</font><hr> I have a picture of this particular joint pin, its from capone and I just wanted to identify it. I wanted to see if anyone knew how and why this contributes to the soft natural hit his cues give. Would this be a radial pin? I noticed the lil hole at the top of the pin too, does this do anything?

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/kdiaz01/jtshfts.jpg <hr /></blockquote>

Yes, it's like a Radial pin, but modified. It looks like he grinds down the first couple of threads and polishes it. This is almost an exact copy of the JW joint Stroud uses, all the way to the cored out ivory sleeve. His has the holes at the end also. You'll see also the threads have a "U" shape instead of a "V" shape. The joint holds together really tight.

Chris

bustah360
05-19-2005, 12:49 PM
so you're saying that the U shape on these threads would hold better than the typical V shape threads?

Popcorn
05-19-2005, 01:00 PM
the internal wood threads don't have any sharp edges that can chip, it makes for a nicer joint. The threads are also filled more completely. Does it really play any better, I doubt it. I like them because they are so precise and easy to work with. They are made by several different manufactures but basically the same but may not be interchangeable. One of the largest suppliers of screws is about to introduce another radial type that will sell for around $4.00. I think the guys doing them now have been gouging on the price a little.

bustah360
05-19-2005, 01:11 PM
Thx popcorn...

Someone from gilbert custom cues stated that the radial increases more weight leaving the cue with forward balance. Is that possible? Being that its a joint pin, could the metal used be that heavy as to shift the cues weight?

Scott Lee
05-19-2005, 02:34 PM
Any cue can be made to be forward-weighted, centered, or back-weighted. It has less to do with the joint pin, than it does with how the cue is constructed.

Scott Lee

tateuts
05-19-2005, 02:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bustah360:</font><hr> Thx popcorn...

Someone from gilbert custom cues stated that the radial increases more weight leaving the cue with forward balance. Is that possible? Being that its a joint pin, could the metal used be that heavy as to shift the cues weight? <hr /></blockquote>

No, not the way he has that set up, especially with no inserts and no steel collar. I think they are hollow too through the whole screw. If weight is a concern, you can get them in aluminum or titanium.

I personally think that the tight fit, coupled with the fairly deep penetration into the shaft and the coarse threads offers a measure of stiffening to the joint area that benefits the playability. That's just my impression of my own cue.

The reason why the fit is so tight is because of the design and they are made to very close tolerances. The problem with a lot of cues without inserts is the cue maker has, say a 3/8 X 10 tap, then gets a batch of screws that are a little under - and you get a bad fit.

Chris

cueball1950
05-19-2005, 09:35 PM
the pin looks like a 3/8/ 10 or 11 modified. the old mohawk cues had a joint pin similar to that one.....mike

Popcorn
05-19-2005, 10:18 PM
They are actually pretty heave compaired to a 3/8 x 10 of the same length. They have a larger root diameter and on the newer ones even have a section that has no threading at all. None of the ones I have bought are hollow.