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View Full Version : Has Anyone Tried Stop-Smoking Aids?



nhp
05-20-2005, 03:03 AM
I'm 24 years old and have been smoking for 12 years already, and I've decided that I need to quit for good. I smoke on average 10 cigarettes per day and if I don't smoke I get all of the withdrawal symptoms, i.e. anxious, irritable, a "cold" feeling in my head and neck, and feeling like I just woke up the entire day.

I've tried cold turkey 3 times and it doesn't work for me. I tried the nicotine gum and it helped a little, but I still had intense cravings to smoke. I've been hearing of these non-nicotine products like 'Smoke-Away' that have a "98% success rate" or something like that, and I am wondering if anyone has tried them? And please don't lecture me on 'cold turkey is the only way' because not all people are the same and can handle things the same way /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Voodoo Daddy
05-20-2005, 03:57 AM
I used the Nicoderm patch in the mid 90's, they probably would have worked if I didnt love Marlboro Lights so much. I did also take some pill my cardio Dr. gave me. You take them while you smoke and have a target date to stop lighting up but the name escapes me..they didnt work either. Good luck with quiting.

Voodoo~~~has always heard "no one likes a quiter" /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Qtec
05-20-2005, 04:28 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I used the Nicoderm patch in the mid 90's, they probably would have worked if I didnt love Marlboro Lights so much. <hr /></blockquote> LOL /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif


"Go do that Voodoo, that you do, so well."
Blazing saddles. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Q

nhp
05-20-2005, 04:33 AM
I wish I hadn't started smoking at such a young age so I could remember what it feels like to be healthier and addiction-free.

catscradle
05-20-2005, 06:00 AM
nhp,
FWIW, I posted what I did to quit in another thread, I cut it and pasted it below. I added a couple of comments to it and they're in blue. You're about the age I was when I quit and at 59 now I still play 90 minutes of soccer on every Sunday, run 5 days a week, and play an occassional game of softball with the 20 somethings at work (do pay for it the next day though) and don't embarrass myself. Even if you aren't interested in keeping specially fit, I think you'd find that your life quality in general would improve. Don't concentrate on the fact that you've been smoking 12 years, remember many, many people who started at 12 years old quit after 30 or 40 years. It can be done if you want it to. You started at 12 because of the environment you were around, now you're a mature person and can create a different environment for yourself.


I think you hit on the key "find something else to do". I quit 33 years ago when I was getting out of the service because of the cost outside (this was before all the current health concerns). I got a little booklet at the PX that helped a lot.
1. Make a list of all the reasons you want to quit and an honest list of all the reasons you want to smoke. I think you'll find the reasons to quit list longer, carry them with you at all times and refer to them often to remind yourself.
2. As silly as it sounds, get a small wallet calender, x off the days you didn't smoke, and carry it with you at all times as reference. As the length of those x's grow, it will provide you with a surprising amount of incentive to continue to grow it.
3. Avoid circumstances you're most likely to smoke. Go for a walk as soon as your through eating rather than light up, avoid bars where you tend to drink and smoke together, and, sad as it may, be avoid pool room if you have to for a while. <font color="blue">This is only temporary.</font color>
4. Engage in a physical activity that is incompatible with smoking. I started running (and still run) and going over the base gym for basketball everyday.
5. Broadcast to as many people as you can that you're quitting, create an environment where it will be embarrassing for you to start again.

Remember you can only quit if <font color="red"> YOU </font color> want to, create circumstance to maximize your desire to quit and minimize the effort it takes. It isn't about willpower, willpower doesn't exist, <font color=":blue">nor is it about quit smoking aids</font color>. It is about the environment <font color="red">YOU</font color> create for yourself.
Go into this prepared, not haphazardly.
Good luck, I'm positive you'll succeed if you want to.


At your age you have a great oppourtunity to reverse all the harm done by your smoking to this point. Go for it with determination.

Barbara
05-20-2005, 06:22 AM
nhp,

I used the Nicotrol inhaler and it really helped me.

It would also help to prepare yourself mentally that you are going to quit and give yourself a date that you will stop smoking. My date was Super Bowl Sunday, 2000. And I haven't lit up since and have no intentions of doing so ever again.

Barbara

PQQLK9
05-20-2005, 06:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> nhp,

I used the Nicotrol inhaler and it really helped me.

It would also help to prepare yourself mentally that you are going to quit and give yourself a date that you will stop smoking. My date was Super Bowl Sunday, 2000. And I haven't lit up since and have no intentions of doing so ever again.

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

Isn't it funny that we remember .... I quit 2/10/80 @ 11:55 pm (had to finish the pack) /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Good luck nhp you can do it.

Rich R.
05-20-2005, 07:02 AM
You probably don't want to hear from me, but, so what. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
I smoked several packs per day.
I tried cutting down a number of times, but it never worked. I was never able to go part way.
I guess I am just one of those people who either smoke or don't smoke. I went cold turkey and it worked for me.
I know others have had some success with the non-smoking aids, but I didn't want to just substitute. I wanted to quit.

Good luck, with whatever method you choose. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif