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View Full Version : Two WW II Japanese soldiers found in the Philippin



Cueless Joey
05-27-2005, 07:41 PM
es.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/philippines_lost_soldiers
I bet they shoot great pool now.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
05-28-2005, 05:37 AM
[ QUOTE ]
The Philippines, then a U.S. colony, was a major battleground in the Pacific. Japanese occupation is remembered as brutal and marked by massacres of civilians and deaths of hundreds of thousands of U.S. and Filipino soldiers.

<hr /></blockquote>

Gayle in MD got hacked off at me for calling the Japanese bloodthirsty during WWII

When I was a kid they used to find those guys hiding in the jungle frequently, once a year or more. The last one I remember was in the early 70's

Chopstick
05-30-2005, 10:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
Gayle in MD got hacked off at me for calling the Japanese bloodthirsty during WWII
<hr /></blockquote>

That's incredible Wally. Considering the hundreds of thousands of Chinese that were gruesomely murdered in biological warfare experiments. The victims included women, children, and American POWs. The shear brutality of what went on in Unit 731 is unbelieveable. They practically invented modern biological warfare.

Asian Auschwitz (http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/08/28/1030508070534.html?oneclick=true)

catscradle
05-31-2005, 06:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
The Philippines, then a U.S. colony, was a major battleground in the Pacific. Japanese occupation is remembered as brutal and marked by massacres of civilians and deaths of hundreds of thousands of U.S. and Filipino soldiers.

<hr /></blockquote>

Gayle in MD got hacked off at me for calling the Japanese bloodthirsty during WWII

When I was a kid they used to find those guys hiding in the jungle frequently, once a year or more. The last one I remember was in the early 70's <hr /></blockquote>

It amazes me that anyone can think the Japanese were anything less than brutal in WWII. They considered themselves superior to all other humans and treated all other humans as something less than human.
The Japanese people today are probably fine (not living in Japan, I don't know), but in WWII and before they were ruthless that much is clear from history.

DebraLiStarr
05-31-2005, 03:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote catscradle:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
The Philippines, then a U.S. colony, was a major battleground in the Pacific. Japanese occupation is remembered as brutal and marked by massacres of civilians and deaths of hundreds of thousands of U.S. and Filipino soldiers.

<hr /></blockquote>

Gayle in MD got hacked off at me for calling the Japanese bloodthirsty during WWII

When I was a kid they used to find those guys hiding in the jungle frequently, once a year or more. The last one I remember was in the early 70's <hr /></blockquote>

It amazes me that anyone can think the Japanese were anything less than brutal in WWII. They considered themselves superior to all other humans and treated all other humans as something less than human.
The Japanese people today are probably fine (not living in Japan, I don't know), but in WWII and before they were ruthless that much is clear from history.

<hr /></blockquote>

I have a slightly differnt view of this. Being Japanese-American (born here) I come from Japanese and Taiwanese descent. My grandfather moved to Japan from Taiwan in 1948 to help rebuild the country after WWII. My parents moved to the U.S. in 1973. As a young girl I remember the sometimes brutal conversations I would hear about the Japanese people and their actions during WWII. I have also received my education in the U.S. and I have had to bite my tongue because I know that as a people we are not brutal. Perhaps the Japanese gov't and the military was, but for every day folks, we are very nice people. The bombs that were dropped were not dropped on military targets. They were dropped on every day people like me and you. I guess that makes the US Gov't just as brutal, or shall we say that war is brutal from all directions no matter who the participants are. I have relatives that were lost in the bombing of Nagasaki and though it was brutal, I don't classify it as an act of the American people, but as an act of the US gov't and their military. As an American I fully support the military, regardless of what has happened in the past. My brother recently returned from Iraq, and im my family we are proud of our heritage, but we are Americans.

Cueless Joey
05-31-2005, 03:21 PM
My uncle is a world war II survivor from the Philippines.
The brutality of the Japanese soldiers and Korean soldiers ( they were prisoners/slaves sent to fight for Japan) is a popular belief there ( whether true or not ) . My uncle claims the Japanese soldiers used bayonets on women and children ( including babies ).
The massacres in China are documented.
WARNING:Gruesome pictures
http://www.cnd.org/njmassacre/page1.html

But, wars make people do heinous things.
Today, Japan is the second largest contributor to the UN's peace plan.

catscradle
06-01-2005, 05:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DebraLiStarr:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote catscradle:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
The Philippines, then a U.S. colony, was a major battleground in the Pacific. Japanese occupation is remembered as brutal and marked by massacres of civilians and deaths of hundreds of thousands of U.S. and Filipino soldiers.

<hr /></blockquote>

Gayle in MD got hacked off at me for calling the Japanese bloodthirsty during WWII

When I was a kid they used to find those guys hiding in the jungle frequently, once a year or more. The last one I remember was in the early 70's <hr /></blockquote>

It amazes me that anyone can think the Japanese were anything less than brutal in WWII. They considered themselves superior to all other humans and treated all other humans as something less than human.
The Japanese people today are probably fine (not living in Japan, I don't know), but in WWII and before they were ruthless that much is clear from history.

<hr /></blockquote>

I have a slightly differnt view of this. Being Japanese-American (born here) I come from Japanese and Taiwanese descent. My grandfather moved to Japan from Taiwan in 1948 to help rebuild the country after WWII. My parents moved to the U.S. in 1973. As a young girl I remember the sometimes brutal conversations I would hear about the Japanese people and their actions during WWII. I have also received my education in the U.S. and I have had to bite my tongue because I know that as a people we are not brutal. Perhaps the Japanese gov't and the military was, but for every day folks, we are very nice people. The bombs that were dropped were not dropped on military targets. They were dropped on every day people like me and you. I guess that makes the US Gov't just as brutal, or shall we say that war is brutal from all directions no matter who the participants are. I have relatives that were lost in the bombing of Nagasaki and though it was brutal, I don't classify it as an act of the American people, but as an act of the US gov't and their military. As an American I fully support the military, regardless of what has happened in the past. My brother recently returned from Iraq, and im my family we are proud of our heritage, but we are Americans. <hr /></blockquote>

I understand your viewpoint. I very carefully avoided the issue of American behaviour (including the concentration camps for Japanese in America during WWII) because that was not the topic of the post.
The atrocities visited upon people by Japanese soldiers during WWII were the actions of the individual soldiers not the government. Just as the massacre at My Lai (sp?) in Vietnam was the action of individual soldiers not the government even if the government established an atmosphere which seemed to condon it. However "justified" given cultural influences and the influences of combat, it was still the result of individual behaviors. Today's Japanese whether living in America or Japan cannot and should not be held accountable for that, but nonetheless it happened. I also might suggest a person's true capability for cruelty and brutality is not exposed until finding themselves in a combat situation.