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SnakebyteXX
06-02-2005, 05:39 AM
Tens of thousands of 'trucker bombs' litter roads

http://img243.echo.cx/img243/1954/truckerjugs8yw.jpg

SEATTLE — Roadside litter comes in all shapes and sizes — from dirty diapers to syringes — but there's one category that out-grosses the rest: trucker bombs.

Most drivers whiz along the nation's highways largely oblivious to their roadside surroundings. But next time you are out there, take a closer look.

"As soon as you look for it you’ll see it," says Megan Warfield, litter programs coordinator at Washington state's Department of Ecology. "You just see them glistening in the sun. It’s just gross."

They are trucker bombs, plastic jugs full of urine tossed by truckers, and even non-truckers, who refuse to make a proper potty stop to relieve themselves.

The state hasn't counted how many such jugs are found each year, but a single, small county decided to do its own tally. "In one year," Warfield says, "one crew found 2,666 bottles of urine, 67 feces covered items, not including diapers, and 18 syringes."

It even happens at rest stops. "That’s the mystery," Warfield says. "There’s a bathroom right there, there’s also a trash can."

Handling the goods
Disposing of trucker bombs, aka torpedoes or pee bottles, is a thankless task that in many cases falls to highway cleanup crews.

California has a hazardous waste contractor to deal with human waste. In Washington, a spill response crew is called in to dispose of large volumes of trucker bombs.

Safety experts emphasize that urine is 99 percent sterile and that jugs of it can be moved if crews avoid contact with the liquid, Warfield says. But cleanup crews remain reluctant, with some fearing the liquid could actually be something else also dumped along highways — dangerous chemicals used to make the illegal drug methamphetamine.

$1,025 fine
Hoping to break truckers of the dirty habit, Washington state lawmakers created a "dangerous litter" category in 2002 and increased fines to $1,025 from $95 for general litter.


Washington Department of Ecology

When it comes to human waste, the dangerous category covers trucker bombs and dirty diapers. Together the accounted for 8,000 pounds of trash collected from state roads last year.

The state has also launched a "Litter and it will hurt" campaign — its first prevention campaign in a decade.

"We have made a little bit of progress," Warfield says, citing a new survey that found 2,000 tons less of roadside litter than in 1999.

The Washington State Patrol issued 3,995 tickets or warnings about litter in 2003, the most recent year for which data is available, nearly 800 fewer than in 2002.

Several other states have taken similar steps to stop truckers from dumping containers of urine. Wyoming this year increased the maximum penalty for littering bodily fluid to nine months in jail and a $1,000 fine. The maximum penalty for other litter is six months in jail and a $750 fine.

Mowers 'hit them, they explode'
In April, Colorado increased its "human waste" fine from $40 to $500. Transportation employees convinced lawmakers of the need for the drastic increase with their tales of finding urine jugs as they mowed roadway ditches. "We hit them, they explode. The operator ends up wearing this stuff," Randy Dobyns told state senators.

Dobyns estimated he picks up at least 50 containers a week, sometimes milk jugs, water bottles or even bags filled with urine. "The folks who dispose of this stuff are very creative in their use of containers," he said.

Some states have gone so far as to appeal to truckers themselves, but Warfield recalls how that backfired on a colleague in Arizona. "He did not get a warm reception," she says.


Poster strategy
Darcy Wilson had another approach after her husband complained of having to pick up trucker bombs left on the grounds of a 10-acre truck stop 30 miles east of Seattle on Interstate 90, a major truck route.

She did some research and found that the state Department of Ecology had made posters that read, "This is not a urinal." The agency was happy to send her the posters, to which she attached an updated sign about the higher state litter fine.

Wilson posted a dozen on light posts and trash cans and says her husband believes he's finding fewer jugs of urine lying around the truck stop.

"People are looking at the fine," she says.

But truckers continue dumping the heavy jugs in trash cans that still have to be emptied. "Truckers don't want to walk into a bathroom" with the jugs, Wilson says, so her husband is urging his boss to order portable bathrooms where truckers could dump the containers in private.

"We'll do anything to not have to pick up that stuff," she says.

Recycling solution?
Unfortunately, a recent breakthrough in diesel filter technology that uses urine won't be helpful.

European researchers are developing a filter that uses animal urine to cut down on harmful emissions. Truckers who use the filter will fill up with the purified urea solution each time they stop for diesel.

But Oliver Kröcher, one of the filter researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute near Zurich, Switzerland, says using human urine "is not practical at all, since ... very pure urea has to be used" and that wouldn't be the case with urine straight from the source.

"Thus, there is no way to apply this crazy idea," he says.


web page (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7912464/)

Cueless Joey
06-02-2005, 10:59 AM
Great.
Make a new law.
Driving with an empty jug next to you is illegal.

DebraLiStarr
06-04-2005, 06:03 PM
With all of this piss floating around on the highways and byways, how the hell do you guys find time to leave the seat up?

DickLeonard
06-05-2005, 11:31 AM
Snakebytex. As a former truck driver I know the solution of the problem and it's not urine. Have you ever seen Tractor Trailer drivers speeding down the road? You wonder what makes them drive like that? They have their ears glued to the CB for the location of the Smokeys.

I give you their scenario they get paid 30+ cents a mile for the trip. They pick up their load in NYC and it takes them 1/2 to 1 hour to get out of town, so for the first hour they got paid 1.20 now they get rolling and for the next hour there pay is 6.00 an hour. Now they pull into a rest area and by the time they park their rig and go to the restroom that is twenty minutes.Now they get rolling and their pay is $12 for that hour after 8 hours of driving they might have made between 80 and 100 hundred dollars. Traffic jams, road construction etc slows their the time clock to a stand still. If you asked any truck driver if they would rather get paid by the hour or by the mile they would all say by the hour. Then when they took rest stops they would get paid for it.####

SpiderMan
06-06-2005, 08:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Snakebytex. As a former truck driver I know the solution of the problem and it's not urine. Have you ever seen Tractor Trailer drivers speeding down the road? You wonder what makes them drive like that? They have their ears glued to the CB for the location of the Smokeys.

I give you their scenario they get paid 30+ cents a mile for the trip. They pick up their load in NYC and it takes them 1/2 to 1 hour to get out of town, so for the first hour they got paid 1.20 now they get rolling and for the next hour there pay is 6.00 an hour. Now they pull into a rest area and by the time they park their rig and go to the restroom that is twenty minutes.Now they get rolling and their pay is $12 for that hour after 8 hours of driving they might have made between 80 and 100 hundred dollars. Traffic jams, road construction etc slows their the time clock to a stand still. If you asked any truck driver if they would rather get paid by the hour or by the mile they would all say by the hour. Then when they took rest stops they would get paid for it.#### <hr /></blockquote>

Dick,

Something is wrong with your math. You said that once you get out of town and "get rolling", the rate is $6.00 an hour. Using your example of 30 cents a mile, that's only 20 miles per hour.

In Texas, they run closer to twice that speed /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Also, $90 a day would imply that you only go 300 miles in a day. We averaged about 500-600 on my summer job, including eating, drinking, and flushing the toilet.

SpiderMan

DickLeonard
06-06-2005, 12:10 PM
Spiderman there are more people in the Metro NYC/NJ area than all of texas,You don't start to move till your almost 90 miles out of town. I have seen 60 mile back ups on the NYS Thruway. 600 miles sounds to me like you're driving over log. A twenty minute stop every 200 miles or do you run with dual logs.#### .

SpiderMan
06-06-2005, 03:06 PM
Sounds like NYC is just a bad place to be a truck driver, but no excuse to avoid toilets in Arizona or Tennesee.

BTW, I'm not a "real" trucker. I used to work for Firestone Tire and Rubber (Memphis) every summer while in college. Memphis to Dallas (460 miles dock-to-dock) was considered a short day's run.

Isn't 30 cents a mile out-of-date? Maybe "Big Rig Tom" can clarify, but I thought non-owners were in the 40 cents and above range now. I believe JB Hunt is the epitome of "entry-level" trucking firms. According to their web site, drivers get 37 cents a mile after six months on the job.

BTW, Firestone paid a combination of hourly and "production", worked out to about $6.50 an hour in 1976.

SpiderMan

DickLeonard
06-07-2005, 07:09 AM
Spiderman I delivered Liquor and got paid by the hour and every delivery I made had a bathroom so I got paid to take a leak.

One day my boss questioned me about my tack. He asked me doesn't your truck go over 55. I told A.J.Foyt gets paid to go fast I don't. He turned around and walked away and I know he was laughing to himself but he didn't want me to know. ####