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Pimpakles
06-07-2005, 06:57 AM
Is it wise to remove the tip from an older cue to apply to a newer cue (assuming everything fits correctly)?

Sid_Vicious
06-07-2005, 07:06 AM
As long as it's big enough to fit with some overlap, people do it all the time, even on purpose...sid

Pimpakles
06-07-2005, 07:58 AM
Thanks!

Scott Lee
06-07-2005, 11:03 AM
Why would you want to do this? Tips are cheap ($1.00 or less for good LePros, Triangles, etc...layered tips cost more).

Scott Lee

Pimpakles
06-07-2005, 11:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Why would you want to do this? Tips are cheap ($1.00 or less for good LePros, Triangles, etc...layered tips cost more).

Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

I had this hard tip put on my old break cue by recommendation. I can't tell what type of tip it is, but it's nicer than the tip that comes with my new break/jump cue.

SpiderMan
06-07-2005, 11:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Pimpakles:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Why would you want to do this? Tips are cheap ($1.00 or less for good LePros, Triangles, etc...layered tips cost more).

Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

I had this hard tip put on my old break cue by recommendation. I can't tell what type of tip it is, but it's nicer than the tip that comes with my new break/jump cue. <hr /></blockquote>

We did exactly that with one of Sid's jump cues. As he mentioned, it works best if the tip is larger than the cue you're installing it on. That way, you can be a little "off" and still trim it flush on the sides.

SpiderMan

Fred Agnir
06-07-2005, 01:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr>
We did exactly that with one of Sid's jump cues. As he mentioned, it works best if the tip is larger than the cue you're installing it on. That way, you can be a little "off" and still trim it flush on the sides.

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>I've had pretty good success with replacing a tip that had popped off. I used three toothpicks, a rubber band, and vaseline. You'd have to figure out the rest.

Fred

Pimpakles
06-07-2005, 04:11 PM
Thanks for the tip, Macgyver.

Nostalgia
06-08-2005, 04:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>I used three toothpicks, a rubber band, and vaseline. You'd have to figure out the rest.<hr /></blockquote>
Last time I did this the neighbors complained to the cops. Um...unless you're talking about something different.

I've said too much!

-Joe

SpiderMan
06-08-2005, 07:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Pimpakles:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> Why would you want to do this? Tips are cheap ($1.00 or less for good LePros, Triangles, etc...layered tips cost more).

Scott Lee <hr /></blockquote>

I had this hard tip put on my old break cue by recommendation. I can't tell what type of tip it is, but it's nicer than the tip that comes with my new break/jump cue. <hr /></blockquote>

We did exactly that with one of Sid's jump cues. As he mentioned, it works best if the tip is larger than the cue you're installing it on. That way, you can be a little "off" and still trim it flush on the sides.
SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>
When the tip is very close to the ferrule size (as may happen when you cut it off another ferrule), you must be very careful to center it while glueing. I use three toothpicks, a couple of rubber bands, and a layer of Scotch tape to keep glue off the ferrule. Here's one of the toughest fits I ever did - a bakelite jump tip on a 14mm ferrule. The tip was only about 0.010" oversize. Position the toothpicks so that their tapers guide the tip down onto the ferrule:

Centering Jig (http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/funkychateau/detail?.dir=9e1d&amp;.dnm=4b58.jpg&amp;.src=ph)

SpiderMan

ras314
06-08-2005, 07:36 AM
What kind of tip is that? Looks like an air cleaner for a model engine. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

How do you get the excess glue off, wipe it when it is set enough to hold the tip? Or is that what the vaselin is for?

ccrider
06-08-2005, 07:40 AM
You do it to save money honey. At the recent Jacksonville upa event the tip man charged $15 just to put a tip on even if you furnished it. When these people begin to badly over charge, $35-40 to install a layered tip, people begin to learn how to do it their selves.

SpiderMan
06-08-2005, 08:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> What kind of tip is that? Looks like an air cleaner for a model engine. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

How do you get the excess glue off, wipe it when it is set enough to hold the tip? Or is that what the vaselin is for?

<hr /></blockquote>

It's a tip made of bakelite, for jumping and breaking. The excess glue (and the pieces of toothpick that will be stuck in it) just get machined off in the lathe. It doesn't show in the picture, but the ferrule has a layer of Scotch tape around it so that the overflow doesn't actually get on it. Not sure why you'd put vaseline on it, assuming we're still talking cues here /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan

SpiderMan
06-08-2005, 08:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ccrider:</font><hr> You do it to save money honey. At the recent Jacksonville upa event the tip man charged $15 just to put a tip on even if you furnished it. When these people begin to badly over charge, $35-40 to install a layered tip, people begin to learn how to do it their selves. <hr /></blockquote>

Actually, I first started doing my own for convenience, rather than cost. I wanted to be able to experiment with tips, which required that I be able to have a short turnaround time. Couldn't do that if I had to involve another person.

Also, I feel that I do a much better job than any of the "mainstream" guys (but then Dallas is a small town, so maybe there are better mechanics out there somewhere). Doing my own work allows me to make certain everything is the way I want it to be.

If you only replace your tip when it wears out from play, you're fooling yourself if you believe you save money by doing it yourself. It has to be done for other reasons ... quality of work, convenience, or just because you like to learn to be self-sufficient. For me it's all three, but then I'm an odd sort. I've recently started doing my own front-end alignments /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

BTW, $15 is a very fair price for someone who does high-quality work. Bringing your own tip doesn't really impact the mechanic's cost, he only pays 50 cents apiece for them anyway.

For the past 5 years, I've been taking in outside work on referral (got to justify the equipment I bought), and I believe I'm giving it away at $15 a pop. One local cuemaker (who does private work as well as contracts to do tip replacements for the local Billiards &amp; Barstools stores) keeps telling me I should raise my prices.

SpiderMan

ras314
06-08-2005, 09:05 AM
Looks like woven fiberglass or something in urethane or epoxy resin with a layer of something else on either end. Didn't know bakelite came that way.

Also looks like the ferrule is already down to size, hard to tell from the pic. Scotch tape sounds like a real good idea.

I started putting on tips a couple years ago because no one close by does them. I haven't reused a tip, mostly because I'm concerned about getting the base flat and square. Also at 50 cents it just doesn't seem worth it since you will wind up with a thinner tip. $10 to $20 tips change that picture.

I've sure got a lot to learn yet.

Scott Lee
06-08-2005, 10:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> I've recently started doing my own front-end alignments /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

...and gas tank replacements...well, at least ONE! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Spiderman does GREAT tip work!

Scott

Pimpakles
06-08-2005, 11:40 AM
What can you tell me about the advantages/disadvantages of a metal ferrule. Are there any recommendations on jump/break tips?

SpiderMan
06-08-2005, 11:51 AM
I don't know of any particular advantage to the metal ferrules.

If you search the archives, you will find reams of discussion on tip recommendations. I personally use a hard water buffalo tip on my break cue, trimmed fairly short and about a quarter radius on the crown.

SpiderMan

Deeman2
06-08-2005, 12:00 PM
Well, I finally broke down and had a layered tip put on one of my extra 314 shafts. It hits nice but I get too much draw from it or maybe it's too sensitive for me. Well. nothing lost, except the money as this was not one of my playing shafts. I was now thinking I could use it when I needed one of those super power F/L draws. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Deeman

SpiderMan
06-08-2005, 12:59 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman2:</font><hr> Well, I finally broke down and had a layered tip put on one of my extra 314 shafts. It hits nice but I get too much draw from it or maybe it's too sensitive for me. Well. nothing lost, except the money as this was not one of my playing shafts. I was now thinking I could use it when I needed one of those super power F/L draws. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Deeman <hr /></blockquote>
What layered tip did you use, and what standard tip are you comparing when you say the layered gives "too much draw"?

BTW, you know FL says "use a friggin' triangle, that's all you need to know".

SpiderMan

Fred Agnir
06-08-2005, 01:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Wh
How do you get the excess glue off, wipe it when it is set enough to hold the tip? Or is that what the vaselin is for?

<hr /></blockquote>For me, the vaseline is to make sure the toothpicks don't stick on the tip.

Fred

Fred Agnir
06-08-2005, 01:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Looks like woven fiberglass or something in urethane or epoxy resin with a layer of something else on either end. Didn't know bakelite came that way. <hr /></blockquote>"Bakelite" has come to be almost a generic term for the fiber based phenolic thermosets.

Fred