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Cane
06-13-2005, 10:28 AM
No joking here ladies and gentlemen... I stopped by Randy's Pool School on my way back from fishing, sunburn, itchy back, peeling nose and all, and had the honor to meet Dave and the other students. Unfortunately, I was a little later than I intended to be and only got to spend an hour or so visiting and watching them as they wound up the three day class.

Dave, honor to meet you and I'm looking forward to hearing your recount of the three day class you took in Dallas. You gave me a brief account when we met at Pool School and talked, but I'm very anxious to hear your impression of the entire class and what you got from it. I actually had intended to volunteer to teach in that class, but hey, Kingfish, Red Snapper, Shark and Flounder for a week in the Surfside, TX was something I'd planned for awhile and could NOT pass up!

In any case, I'm glad to be home and will check the board awaiting your pool school stories! Oh, and the Petty Point Stories, too. I really hate that I missed that, but I'll be there for the chili cook off for SURE!

Missed all of you guys! Good to be back home to CCB and Oklahoma!

Later,
Bob (now known in Surfside as Kingfish Bob... yeah, I knocked 'em outta da watta!)

dr_dave
06-13-2005, 11:25 AM
Bob,

Thanks for the nice words. I also enjoyed meeting you, if only briefly. I can vouch for the sunburn ... you had a pretty good raccoon look going on. At least the UV blocking sunglasses protected the skin around your eyes. You know, there's this stuff on the market called sun screen. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Concerning CueTech, I was very impressed. I thought the mix of lectures, demonstrations, drills, and video analysis was very well done. Randy's stories and personality were also important components, helping to keep things fun. Having several instructors was very helpful. Getting one-on-one help from various people is good since different people see different things. The thing with which I was most impressed was the video analysis. If there are instructors out there that don't use video analysis yet, they should (IMHO). Having students look at and discuss their own and other students' videos from different views was very instructional and fun (and sometimes embarrassing, but in a good way). Randy, Leslie, and the other instructors are very good at spotting potential problems and recommending possible fixes. I thought the use of dry eraser markers on the monitors, along with frame freezing and stepping, was very well done.

Personally, I have been tinkering around with almost every aspect of my stance and stroke the last two months, and I'm glad I have been. When I got to Dallas, I felt so unsettled with everything, it made it easier to not resist new things. With Randy's help, I was able to make some small (and some major) changes in my technique that I think will help my game dramatically. (Although, there's still the small issue of needing time for practice, which is sometimes hard to come by.) Some of my shortcomings included fast eye motion, grip hand a little too far back (i.e., forearm not vertical) and tense at times, a bridge length too short for my height and stance, not setting myself and giving myself enough time for my vision to settle on the target before the final stroke, etc. I still have an issue with my glasses. They are too small and they make it difficult for me to get down low without excessive neck strain. I've also brought my head up a little to help with some of the other stance issues and to reduce the neck strain. However, contact lenses and/or Lasik is definitely in my near future.

Randy, if you're out there listening, you have my warmest thanks. You run a great school and I loved getting to know you. I think I learned some things that will improve my game dramatically. I also enjoyed and value getting your perspectives on how to teach some of the fundamentals of the game. I'm sure this will help me make my next book a better product than it would have been otherwise.

Regards,
Dave

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> No joking here ladies and gentlemen... I stopped by Randy's Pool School on my way back from fishing, sunburn, itchy back, peeling nose and all, and had the honor to meet Dave and the other students. Unfortunately, I was a little later than I intended to be and only got to spend an hour or so visiting and watching them as they wound up the three day class.

Dave, honor to meet you and I'm looking forward to hearing your recount of the three day class you took in Dallas. You gave me a brief account when we met at Pool School and talked, but I'm very anxious to hear your impression of the entire class and what you got from it. I actually had intended to volunteer to teach in that class, but hey, Kingfish, Red Snapper, Shark and Flounder for a week in the Surfside, TX was something I'd planned for awhile and could NOT pass up!

In any case, I'm glad to be home and will check the board awaiting your pool school stories! Oh, and the Petty Point Stories, too. I really hate that I missed that, but I'll be there for the chili cook off for SURE!

Missed all of you guys! Good to be back home to CCB and Oklahoma!

Later,
Bob (now known in Surfside as Kingfish Bob... yeah, I knocked 'em outta da watta!) <hr /></blockquote>

randyg
06-13-2005, 12:26 PM
Dr_Dave: I'm tired. That class wore me out. Have you ever seen such avid students? My God, every one of you was a sponge.

I think the most fun of teaching is watching you &amp; other students unlocking their problems little by little.

Dave, you are a role model student. I just hope that I can be as good as you are when I'm an student. Maybe my golf instructor will have a little easier time with me from now on.

Thanks for the leadership you displayed in the class. I know that all the other students and Instructors alike enjoyed your three days. Hope we get together again soon. Don't forget to "Pause"........SPF (your friend)...randyg

dr_dave
06-13-2005, 01:26 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr>Dave, you are a role model student. I just hope that I can be as good as you are when I'm an student. <hr /></blockquote>
Thanks Randy. I think that's the greatest compliment a teacher could ever receive. Just like medical doctors often make terrible patients, teachers often make terrible students. I bet you would also be a good student.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr>Don't forget to "Pause"........SPF (your friend)...randyg<hr /></blockquote>
I already practiced some during lunch today. You would have been proud of my "pause." I was "stopping" for way more than an "instant." In fact, a deliberate pause before my final forward stroke seems to help so much during practice, I think I will try to also incorporate it into my normal game (like Buddy Hall and Allison Fisher). It seems to help my accuracy. The deliberate pause seems necessary for me to start my forward stroke smoothly, staying relaxed. But maybe a more continuous stroke might be better for play in the future once I practice enough with the deliberate pause. I plan to tinker with this some over the next few months.

Regards,
Dave (also your friend)

randyg
06-13-2005, 01:50 PM
Tinker away, you now have "Centergistics".....randyg

pooltchr
06-13-2005, 01:51 PM
Dave,
We have had many lengthy discussions about the pause on this forum. Isn't it amazing that when you get in the class and actually start doing it, how much it improves your accuracy.
I love the forums, but there is no substitute for practical application on the table for true understanding of the benefits.

Glad you had a good time. Randy, Doc, and the entire staff certainly can pack a lot into 3 days, can't they?!!

Steve

dr_dave
06-13-2005, 02:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Dave,
We have had many lengthy discussions about the pause on this forum. Isn't it amazing that when you get in the class and actually start doing it, how much it improves your accuracy.<hr /></blockquote>You're right about the accuracy. It certainly seems to be helping me.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr>I love the forums, but there is no substitute for practical application on the table for true understanding of the benefits.<hr /></blockquote>
Well stated. I agree 100%.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr>Glad you had a good time. Randy, Doc, and the entire staff certainly can pack a lot into 3 days, can't they?!!<hr /></blockquote>
I had a great time, and it certainly was a long and tiring 3 days. I didn't get much sleep, from socializing and playing pool each night I was there (despite Randy's orders to not play pool after school ... I guess I'm a bad student after all), but I'm glad I got the most of my time in Dallas.

Regards,
Dave

Cane
06-13-2005, 02:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dr_dave:</font><hr> I didn't get much sleep, from socializing and playing pool each night I was there (despite Randy's orders to not play pool after school ... <hr /></blockquote>

Dave,
You think it's hard to not play after class in THAT class, you should take the Expert Class. I think I missed every evening meal when I was there, going straight to a pool table after class was over! When I left there on Sunday, I drove the nearly 4 hours home and sometime around daylight the next morning, Billie drove down to the pool room to find me and "Baby, you have GOT to come home &amp; get some sleep!" I was like a kid in a candy store! /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Later,
Bob

randyg
06-13-2005, 02:35 PM
Cane: What do you mean "was"??????randyg

Cane
06-13-2005, 02:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> Cane: What do you mean "was"??????randyg <hr /></blockquote>

LOL, Well, maybe WAS wasn't the proper word... replace that with "am eternally"! I LOVE pool, but not an addict!!! OH, NOOOOOO... There are only TWO times I will play pool... Daylight or Dark!

Randy's right, though. Every day I find a pool table somewhere. When I went on vacation last week, my cue case was the first thing packed in my car. I hit balls every day, whether it's league, tournaments, practice or teaching. Makes me no difference, as long as I get to hit balls and hear them fall in the pockets. That's bad, huh... /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Later,
Bob

Thunderduck
06-13-2005, 09:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dr_dave:</font><hr> Bob,

Thanks for the nice words. I also enjoyed meeting you, if only briefly. I can vouch for the sunburn ... you had a pretty good raccoon look going on. At least the UV blocking sunglasses protected the skin around your eyes. You know, there's this stuff on the market called sun screen. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Concerning CueTech, I was very impressed. I thought the mix of lectures, demonstrations, drills, and video analysis was very well done. Randy's stories and personality were also important components, helping to keep things fun. Having several instructors was very helpful. Getting one-on-one help from various people is good since different people see different things. The thing with which I was most impressed was the video analysis. If there are instructors out there that don't use video analysis yet, they should (IMHO). Having students look at and discuss their own and other students' videos from different views was very instructional and fun (and sometimes embarrassing, but in a good way). Randy, Leslie, and the other instructors are very good at spotting potential problems and recommending possible fixes. I thought the use of dry eraser markers on the monitors, along with frame freezing and stepping, was very well done.

Personally, I have been tinkering around with almost every aspect of my stance and stroke the last two months, and I'm glad I have been. When I got to Dallas, I felt so unsettled with everything, it made it easier to not resist new things. With Randy's help, I was able to make some small (and some major) changes in my technique that I think will help my game dramatically. (Although, there's still the small issue of needing time for practice, which is sometimes hard to come by.) Some of my shortcomings included fast eye motion, grip hand a little too far back (i.e., forearm not vertical) and tense at times, a bridge length too short for my height and stance, not setting myself and giving myself enough time for my vision to settle on the target before the final stroke, etc. I still have an issue with my glasses. They are too small and they make it difficult for me to get down low without excessive neck strain. I've also brought my head up a little to help with some of the other stance issues and to reduce the neck strain. However, contact lenses and/or Lasik is definitely in my near future.

Randy, if you're out there listening, you have my warmest thanks. You run a great school and I loved getting to know you. I think I learned some things that will improve my game dramatically. I also enjoyed and value getting your perspectives on how to teach some of the fundamentals of the game. I'm sure this will help me make my next book a better product than it would have been otherwise.

Regards,
Dave
<hr /></blockquote>

Dave, I have watched all your videos and obviously you're 100 times a better pool player then me and most of my friends... but I did notice your stance seemed very uncomfortable,... I was wondering what they told you to change about it. Im curious because I also have the same stance and I'm trying to change mine too...

Tduck

pooltchr
06-14-2005, 05:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> When I went on vacation last week, my cue case was the first thing packed in my car. <hr /></blockquote>

Sign of a noobee!!!! My cue is the LAST thing I pack...That way it's the first thing out, just in case I don't feel like unpacking the car right away. Also, What if you found a pool table on your way to your destination??? Haven't you learned ANYTHING from all that time in school??????

/ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif
Steve

Qtec
06-14-2005, 06:09 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Personally, I have been tinkering around with almost every aspect of my stance and stroke the last two months, and I'm glad I have been <hr /></blockquote>

Why? Dont you know what you are supposed to be doing? /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Qtec.....serious,.. but with a Little Cajun humour........ /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

DickLeonard
06-14-2005, 06:18 AM
Dr. Dave one of my road partners Was Dickie McConnell of North Adams who had Juvenile Diabetes and wore thick glasses and heavy rims. He was the guttiest player I ever met. Well he would raise his glasses by wrinkling his nose so that he never looked over the rims.

Now for your height problem I would play with Larry Hubbard of the APA,Mike Sigel's road partner in the 60s/70s. Larry would take the normal stance in line with the cueball then spread his both legs out creating a rock solid tripod with his hand on the table. Reducing his height so he was in line with the shot. I would estimate that the spread from one foot to the other was 4ft at least. Try this stance
and you will see your height reduce and your stance become rock solid too. ####

SpiderMan
06-14-2005, 06:46 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Dr. Dave one of my road partners Was Dickie McConnell of North Adams who had Juvenile Diabetes and wore thick glasses and heavy rims. He was the guttiest player I ever met. Well he would raise his glasses by wrinkling his nose so that he never looked over the rims.

Now for your height problem I would play with Larry Hubbard of the APA,Mike Sigel's road partner in the 60s/70s. Larry would take the normal stance in line with the cueball then spread his both legs out creating a rock solid tripod with his hand on the table. Reducing his height so he was in line with the shot. I would estimate that the spread from one foot to the other was 4ft at least. Try this stance
and you will see your height reduce and your stance become rock solid too. #### <hr /></blockquote>

I've been doing something like this for the past few years, and like the results. Maybe not 4' between my feet, but more than most. I had originally learned the "basic" stance (alignment, back leg straight, front leg bent, etc) from sources used to dealing with shorter people. As a result of watching pictures and video of myself, I realized that I was hairpinning my elbow and kinking my back more than most. So I started spreading my stance a little and it feels a lot better. Also, the wider tripod does seem to result in less sway from side to side.

Dave, I noticed this weekend that you usually bend both knees. Is that in order to get lower? If so, try what #### is suggesting, as it will probably be more repeatable. It's hard to consistently "crouch" the same amount each time. Plus, your legs will get tired faster if both are bent.

SpiderMan

DickLeonard
06-14-2005, 07:58 AM
Spiderman How tall are you? Larry's stance allowed for no sway at all. Line the cue up with the shot, then spread your feet till your down on the shot, be sure to push your rear out to lower you even more.

It sounds like Dr.Dave is standing like Irving Crane, his stance looked like he was sitting on a toilet without touching the seat.####

dr_dave
06-14-2005, 08:06 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Thunderduck:</font><hr>Dave, I have watched all your videos and obviously you're 100 times a better pool player then me and most of my friends... but I did notice your stance seemed very uncomfortable,... I was wondering what they told you to change about it. Im curious because I also have the same stance and I'm trying to change mine too...<hr /></blockquote>
My stance, going in to CueTech, can be viewed at:

Dr. Dave's pre-CueTech stance (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/CueTech/images/Dave%27s%20retarded%20grip%2C%20high%20elbow%2C%20 low%20chin%2C%20short%20bridge.jpg)

The photo is of a TV screen with dry eraser pen markings from Randy. Sorry, but I don't have an "after" photo to share with you yet. The things I changed at CueTech include:
- lengthened my bridge
- raised my upper body and head a little to reduce neck strain. (I've literally had a "pain in my neck" the last two months from trying to get too low on the stick with my small lens glasses.)
- shortened my grip to bring my forearm closer to vertical at impact.
- relaxed my grip. I am currently leaving my index and little fingers dangling (although Randy did not recommend this, nor did he disapprove). I call it the Texas Longhorn (or bullshit) grip. It's working well for me. Like many things in pool, personal comfort and preferrence are very important. That's why personalized instruction is so useful.

Some people think my stance looks uncomfortable because of my wide foot placement, but this actually feels very comfortable for me. Also, it is required due to my height (6' 3"). I'm even playing around with widening my feet to make it easier to get lower with less knee and back bend. Why did you think my stance looked uncomfortable?

Always improving and striving for comfort,
Dave

dr_dave
06-14-2005, 08:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr><blockquote><font class="small">Quote dr_dave:</font><hr>Personally, I have been tinkering around with almost every aspect of my stance and stroke the last two months, and I'm glad I have been<hr /></blockquote>
Why? Dont you know what you are supposed to be doing? /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Qtec.....serious,.. but with a Little Cajun humour........ /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif <hr /></blockquote>
I'm from Louisiana originally (New Orleans), so I don't mind a little Cajun (or LittleCajun) humor every once in a while.

I think I know a lot about what people are supposed to do in general, but:
- doing is very different from knowing. Video cameras and mirrors can reveal a lot (see the posting dealing with Dr. Dave's stance improvements (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=197243&amp;page =0&amp;view=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;vc=1)). I plan to start using video and mirrors a lot more to help me maintain and improve my technique in practice.
- personal preference and comfort are major factors in pool technique. What's works for most people doesn't always work for everybody. But I'm sure you already know all about that, being a snooker coach.

Regards,
Dave

dr_dave
06-14-2005, 08:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr>Dr. Dave one of my road partners Was Dickie McConnell of North Adams who had Juvenile Diabetes and wore thick glasses and heavy rims. He was the guttiest player I ever met. Well he would raise his glasses by wrinkling his nose so that he never looked over the rims.<hr /></blockquote>
I've already started calling around about getting Lasik done soon. I've decided I don't want to wear glasses anymore, and I don't like contacts (I used them for a year).

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr>Now for your height problem I would play with Larry Hubbard of the APA,Mike Sigel's road partner in the 60s/70s. Larry would take the normal stance in line with the cueball then spread his both legs out creating a rock solid tripod with his hand on the table. Reducing his height so he was in line with the shot. I would estimate that the spread from one foot to the other was 4ft at least. Try this stance
and you will see your height reduce and your stance become rock solid too.<hr /></blockquote>
Thanks for the advice. My current foot separation is a little more than 3 feet, but I'm experimenting with making it bigger. My stance already feels rock solid (I think that's one advantage of being tall), but the extra separation might make it easier for my to stay down low (see my other posting (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=197243&amp;page =0&amp;view=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;vc=1) for more info).

Thanks again,
Dave

dr_dave
06-14-2005, 08:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr>Dave, I noticed this weekend that you usually bend both knees. Is that in order to get lower? If so, try what #### is suggesting, as it will probably be more repeatable. It's hard to consistently "crouch" the same amount each time. Plus, your legs will get tired faster if both are bent.<hr /></blockquote>
Wow. I think I like getting all of this free advice. Thanks. I agree with you 100% about the knee bend. I am experimenting with widening my stance, but it doesn't feel comfortable yet. I think one reason I keep slight bend in both legs is that it seems to reduce strain on my hamstrings, with which I have chronic trouble. I guess I need to stretch my hams and calves more.

Thanks,
Dave

PS: I enjoyed meeting you this weekend, and I was very impressed with your play (technique and strategy). I hope to see you again soon (preferably after my game gets better).

Qtec
06-14-2005, 09:34 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif Dave you missed the point, but never mind. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

When I look at your photo of your stance, its basically sound. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif You do need a slight change in stance, but the wrist says everything.
If you want your arm to be in the perpendicular, you need to relax your wrist. Relax the wrist and you can relax your arm and then let gravity take over. Its that simple.
This will lead to a slightly longer bridge, like the SPFF boys have already told you.

My gereral impression of the photo is .........stiff/tense. I dont think you were relaxed at all.

Qtec

dr_dave
06-14-2005, 09:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr>When I look at your photo of your stance, its basically sound. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif You do need a slight change in stance, but the wrist says everything.
If you want your arm to be in the perpendicular, you need to relax your wrist. Relax the wrist and you can relax your arm and then let gravity take over. Its that simple.
This will lead to a slightly longer bridge, like the SPFF boys have already told you.

My gereral impression of the photo is .........stiff/tense. I dont think you were relaxed at all.

Qtec<hr /></blockquote>

Thanks, Qtec. I'm loving all of this free advice. I (and I think Randy) agree with you 100%. My new and improved stance looks much better. I don't have a photo posted (it's my secret), but some of the changes are described in my other posting (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=197243&amp;page =0&amp;view=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;vc=1).

Regards,
Dave

Stretch
06-14-2005, 10:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dr_dave:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr>Dr. Dave one of my road partners Was Dickie McConnell of North Adams who had Juvenile Diabetes and wore thick glasses and heavy rims. He was the guttiest player I ever met. Well he would raise his glasses by wrinkling his nose so that he never looked over the rims.<hr /></blockquote>
I've already started calling around about getting Lasik done soon. I've decided I don't want to wear glasses anymore, and I don't like contacts (I used them for a year).

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr>Now for your height problem I would play with Larry Hubbard of the APA,Mike Sigel's road partner in the 60s/70s. Larry would take the normal stance in line with the cueball then spread his both legs out creating a rock solid tripod with his hand on the table. Reducing his height so he was in line with the shot. I would estimate that the spread from one foot to the other was 4ft at least. Try this stance
and you will see your height reduce and your stance become rock solid too.<hr /></blockquote>
Thanks for the advice. My current foot separation is a little more than 3 feet, but I'm experimenting with making it bigger. My stance already feels rock solid (I think that's one advantage of being tall), but the extra separation might make it easier for my to stay down low (see my other posting (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=197243&amp;page =0&amp;view=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;vc=1) for more info).

Thanks again,
Dave <hr /></blockquote>

Hi Dave. I'm 6'5" (4") depending on my mood. So my stance by necessity was to addapt a ballenced, solid crouch. I played snooker a lot when i first started learning the game and most favored the strieght back leg. One advantage to the straight leg is you can lock in your alignment. If you've ever seen Steven Hendry, he does that. When he sets up for the shot Steven points his right foot in the direction of the shot, steps out with the left, lines up his cue from left to right, comeing in till he locks up the right leg in line with shot. He aint goin anywhere, solid as a rock. I tryed it for awile but it became too painfull lol. Plus the 9 ball and 8 ball tables are all 2 to 4 inches LOWER than a snooker table. Jeezes at first i'd get down for a shot and wonder if i was ever going to get back up again. "adapt" So ya i'm a croucher but the problem is, there is no such "locking mechanism" when both kneese are bent. Comfort and ballence of course are what is strived for. But within that framework you have to be aware of locking it......till u just do that is. St.~~from the ground up~~

SpiderMan
06-14-2005, 10:38 AM
Dick,

I'm only 6'3", but a lot of it is in my legs. I wear a 37" inseam.

SpiderMan

Thunderduck
06-14-2005, 09:04 PM
Dave, wow, we must be twins! I bend the knees because my calves and hamstrings are very tight... it just looks like you had the same stance that I have, legs very far forward, lots of stress on the knees. I'm also 6 ft 3... that stance is starting to kill me! I found I had to spread my feet wider for more stability, and not step as far forward actually... anyhow, keep us posted on your progress... I'm sure I can benefit greatly from what you learn... Anyhow, I saw your videos, Im not sure why you need lessons, you never miss! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Tduck

Cane
06-14-2005, 09:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dr_dave:</font><hr> I've already started calling around about getting Lasik done soon. I've decided I don't want to wear glasses anymore, and I don't like contacts (I used them for a year). <hr /></blockquote>

Dave, You won't regret the Lasik. I've had it done, and I believe Fred Agnir also had it done. I'm very pleased with mine. Had it done in January, and now my binocular vision is 20/15. Be sure and inquire about Wavefront or CustomVue. It's a bit more precise than what most people require, but for pool players, it's the Nuts in Lasik.

Before I had it done, I did however have a lot of success with Decot HyWyde (sp?) glasses designed for pool players. They are certainly the most ugly thing I've ever worn, but they do the trick. Still have them... I don't know WHY, but they sit on top of the fridge in the case! Hell, I still have a LOT of things I don't know why I don't get rid of! Pack Rat, I guess! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Later,
Bob

Qtec
06-15-2005, 03:53 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Thanks, Qtec. I'm loving all of this free advice. I (and I think Randy) agree with you 100%. <hr /></blockquote> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Dave, you dont know how good that makes me feel! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I will go even further. here,s what I think.
You were planning to go to Pool school. You didnt want to embarrass yourself /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif and naturally you wanted to play your best, so you started praticing. It didnt go too well, so you made a change to your stance[ or whatever] , then another, and another....till you got to the point that you didnt know what you were doing anymore!
You are an intelligent guy, you must have seen yourself 100,s of times of video in the preparation of your website so really you should already know what you should be practicing!
The point is, you could have saved yourself years of fumbling about in the dark, if you had just gone to a good instructor in the begining.
Even if you have a vast amount of knowledge, it is still extremly difficult to train one,s self.

Your post is a classic example of why people should take lessons/instruction/coaching.

Nothing personal Dave.

Qtec /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fred Agnir
06-15-2005, 07:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> You won't regret the Lasik. I've had it done, and I believe Fred Agnir also had it done. <hr /></blockquote>

LASIK - 3 yr report (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=177378&amp;page =&amp;view=&amp;sb=&amp;o=&amp;vc=1)

As an update to the above report, I did in fact bring my wife up to LASIKMD in Canada to get her eyes done. It's been about 6 months, and she just had her 6 month check up. No issues. Not even dry eye syndrome. She's very pleased, as she's been wearing eye correction for over 25 years. She was at about -4 to -4.5 diopters in each eye (that's about 20/300 or 20/350 I guess).

Fred

dr_dave
06-15-2005, 08:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr>here,s what I think.
You were planning to go to Pool school. You didnt want to embarrass yourself /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif and naturally you wanted to play your best, so you started praticing. It didnt go too well, so you made a change to your stance[ or whatever] , then another, and another....till you got to the point that you didnt know what you were doing anymore!
You are an intelligent guy, you must have seen yourself 100,s of times of video in the preparation of your website so really you should already know what you should be practicing!
The point is, you could have saved yourself years of fumbling about in the dark, if you had just gone to a good instructor in the begining.
Even if you have a vast amount of knowledge, it is still extremly difficult to train one,s self.

Your post is a classic example of why people should take lessons/instruction/coaching.

Nothing personal Dave.<hr /></blockquote>
Qtec,

I don't object at all to your posting, because it is a fairly accurate summary. I certainly agree with you that a good instructor can be invaluable to people at any level. If you look at all of the great athletes (Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Allison Fisher, etc.), they are the best students of their respective games, always striving to get better. They are also the most receptive to advice from coaches, trainers, instructors, books, etc. (i.e., they are great students). They don't let pride or stubbornness get in the way of being all that they can be.

Regards,
Dave

PS: I think it is a good idea to tinker with lots of things before seeing an instructor. It messes you up so much and takes you out of your comfort zone, making it easier to try new things and embrace change.

dr_dave
06-15-2005, 08:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> You won't regret the Lasik. I've had it done, and I believe Fred Agnir also had it done. <hr /></blockquote>

LASIK - 3 yr report (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=177378&amp;page =&amp;view=&amp;sb=&amp;o=&amp;vc=1)

As an update to the above report, I did in fact bring my wife up to LASIKMD in Canada to get her eyes done. It's been about 6 months, and she just had her 6 month check up. No issues. Not even dry eye syndrome. She's very pleased, as she's been wearing eye correction for over 25 years. She was at about -4 to -4.5 diopters in each eye (that's about 20/300 or 20/350 I guess).<hr /></blockquote>
Bob and Fred,

Thanks for the info and encouragement. It helps to know that others have taken the plunge and have had good experiences. I'm looking forward to my consultation appointment in two weeks.

Dave