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Qtec
06-17-2005, 04:14 AM
article (http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,1508452,00.html)
Coming to a hard disk near you

You may never have heard of BitTorrent, but it made the latest Star Wars movie available six hours before its official release, it can get you 24 or the OC months before they're on TV and it accounts for a third of all internet traffic. No wonder the entertainment industry has declared it public enemy number one. By Simon Waldman

Friday June 17, 2005
The Guardian

The FBI doesn't like it. The Department of Homeland Security is so concerned that it has closed down websites related to it. The Moving Picture Association of America is waging a war against it. And every day millions of people around the world use it to share music, TV programmes and movies.
The "it" is BitTorrent - a computer program that's the brainchild of the softly-spoken Bram Cohen. It is a super-smart way to share huge files over the internet, and one which, depending on whose side of the argument you listen to, is either an evil tool for those involved with copyright theft, or a work of genius set to transform the media industry as we know it.

Recent research has shown that, last year, BitTorrent was responsible for one third of all traffic on the internet. That's one third. And this despite a wave of legal activity against the peer-to-peer technology (P2P) that underpins Cohen's brainchild.

In essence, BitTorrent is just the latest in a line of programs that started with Napster and allows individuals to swap information with each other over the internet. An OECD report on digital music released this week revealed that at any one time there are as many as 10 million people exchanging files using all forms of P2P. Business Week has estimated that the total number of users could be as high as 100 million.

BitTorrent has become more popular than its competition because it is much more efficient. Systems such as Napster and Kazaa often used to grind to a halt because the files that were being shared sat on one computer, and could only be downloaded as quickly as the lines going in and out of that computer would allow.

Cohen's idea was to break the files up into bits. Once someone downloaded a bit, they also became a source for that bit. As a result, more people downloading a file meant there were also more people uploading it, which meant it actually became faster rather than slower.

Originally intended for software developers to move their work around the net, it wasn't long before BitTorrent became popular with music and video fans. This shouldn't have come as much of a surprise: instead of people simply swapping songs of around 3-4 megabytes, using BitTorrent they could swap whole movies of about 500 times bigger (1.5 gigabytes).

Q /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Cueless Joey
06-17-2005, 06:34 AM
Thanks for the article Q.
THe way I look at it, the authorities are wasting their time and money. You just cannot stop technology when it comes to file sharing. The music industry did it to themselves. They closed Napster originally so of course a bigger and badder file sharing software/provider will come out.
Sony has announced they will release DVD movies right after some of their movies hit the theater. Really, we are getting close to that age where people won't go the movies anymore.
Do you really want to pay $15 for Cold Play's new cd? /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
I'd rather pay $1. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
The way it's going, musicians will soon make the majority of their money off their concerts.

Qtec
06-17-2005, 07:00 AM
What hurts the industry the most are illegal copies that are being sold on the streets,back alleys and markets. To do that, all you need is to buy an original and copy it!

I prefer BitComet myself! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Q

................Off topic, but related, my personal favorite is the virtual drive.[ ie,DAEMON tools] If ever there was an example of thinking 'outside the box', this was it. Brilliant!

Chopstick
06-17-2005, 07:28 AM
Well, that's sort of what happened. This article doesn't present the facts very well. It was Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the FBI that executed the warrants. They weren't after BitTorrent. They were after a file sharing network operation called Elite Torrents that was illegally distributing movies and software on a fairly large scale. Here is a link to the ICE press release.

FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ANNOUNCES CRACKDOWN ON P2P PIRACY NETWORK (http://www.ice.gov/graphics/news/newsreleases/articles/starwars052505.htm)

There is a series being shown now on one of the HD cable channes I get. It's HDnet of INDnet I think. Anyway, it's an open panel disscussion between CEOs of music and movie companies and P2P network companies. It was very interesting.

Bram Cohen was on the panel. One thing he mentioned is that an Ebay style auction system would be coming out in P2P format. Large institutions hate P2P technology because they can't control what people do with it.

Qtec
06-17-2005, 07:47 AM
Read the whole article (http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,1508452,00.html)

Q

Chopstick
06-17-2005, 08:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> Read the whole article (http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,1508452,00.html)

Q <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue">I assume that you mean this part. </font color>

The other debate is whether BitTorrent itself (and, by extension, Cohen) is responsible for piracy. No one is arguing whether or not copyright infringement happens, but whether by banning the software that allows it you are also stifling a new and exciting technology.

At the moment, the US supreme court is making its mind up in the case of MGM v Grokster - where the issue is whether a piece of software itself can be held responsible for the piracy that is committed using it.

<font color="blue">That's a bit of a stretch on the authors part. All of the P2P companies agree that the artists should be compensated for their works. The current problem is that the infrastructure for collection and distribution of funds is lagging behind the trend. I heard Cohen say that financial institutions don't have any interest in small value transactions. Cohen gave an example of PayPal. He said if you wanted to sell a song for 25 cents PayPal would charge 25 cents for the transaction. Who wants to pay that?

The situation with EBay is getting worse. They keep raising their transaction fees because they have a captive audience. They are going to do everything in their power to stop a P2P auction system.

The large institutions want to use your increasing dependance of computers to control your life and take your money. Bill Gates is the worst offender. He has no interest in producing a quality product. All he is interested in is monopoly.</font color>

Qtec
06-17-2005, 09:19 AM
[ QUOTE ]
That's a bit of a stretch on the authors part. All of the P2P companies agree that the artists should be compensated for their works. The current problem is that the infrastructure for collection and distribution of funds is lagging behind the trend. I heard Cohen say that financial institutions don't have any interest in small value transactions. Cohen gave an example of PayPal. He said if you wanted to sell a song for 25 cents PayPal would charge 25 cents for the transaction. Who wants to pay that? <hr /></blockquote>

Why should I pay 50ct for something I can get for free on the web?

Isnt something worth the price people are willing to pay for it?

They just never imagined that people would be able to give their product away for free.

Q

Chopstick
06-17-2005, 09:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr>
Why should I pay 50ct for something I can get for free on the web?

Isnt something worth the price people are willing to pay for it?

They just never imagined that people would be able to give their product away for free.

Q <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue">'Cause it ain't honest. I download music to see what it is. If I like it I go buy it. I bought a CD online for the first time. I just wanted a couple songs. off of it. What I like about this new format is I get to buy only the songs I want. How many times have you bought a CD that had only one good song on it. These music companies know this. If a band has ten good songs the music company won't let them put them all on the same CD. They put one or two good ones on there and fill out the rest with crappy ones.

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