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View Full Version : lessons from pros, a good idea?



feetdoc
06-22-2005, 06:27 AM
is getting lessons from a female pro a good idea at 75 an hour ..i have it scheduled should i cancel?

Rich R.
06-22-2005, 06:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote feetdoc:</font><hr> is getting lessons from a female pro a good idea at 75 an hour ..i have it scheduled should i cancel? <hr /></blockquote>
It depends what pro and how good a teacher she is.
Being a good player does not make a good teacher. However, some good players are also very good teachers. A blanket statement can not be made to cover all pros, who also teach, whether they are female or male. You will have to decide if you got your money's worth.

landshark77
06-22-2005, 07:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote feetdoc:</font><hr> is getting lessons from a female pro a good idea at 75 an hour ..i have it scheduled should i cancel? <hr /></blockquote>
It depends what pro and how good a teacher she is.
<hr /></blockquote>

I'll bet it is Karen Corr. Who ever it is don't analyze their dress....focus on the game. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

feetdoc
06-22-2005, 07:55 AM
well it is karen...is she a good instructor?

LARRY_BOY
06-22-2005, 08:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote feetdoc:</font><hr> well it is karen...is she a good instructor? <hr /></blockquote>

The only way you are going to find out is to spend $75.....besides a instructor might be considered "good" to one person might not be "good" for someone else.

feetdoc
06-22-2005, 08:36 AM
has anyone had lessons from karen or any other female pro?

LARRY_BOY
06-22-2005, 08:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote feetdoc:</font><hr> has anyone had lessons from karen or any other female pro? <hr /></blockquote>

I really don't know why you keep bringing up "female" pro....that really makes no diferance. The only thing you are getting from Karen is a pool lesson.

Rich R.
06-22-2005, 08:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote feetdoc:</font><hr> has anyone had lessons from karen or any other female pro? <hr /></blockquote>
I may be wrong, but it seems like you are determined to take lessons from a female pro player.
Why not consider one of the professional instructors? /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

feetdoc
06-22-2005, 08:49 AM
well then if there is no difference then why cant womne compete with the men ? and anyways the women are easier to look at during the lesson

Chopstick
06-22-2005, 09:03 AM
I have done this with a couple of well known pros. The most important part is for you to define specific goals before you get in front of them. Just wanting to shoot good is too general. Make a list of questions or problem shots you want to work on. This will give them something to get started to work with you. Carry a camcorder and tape the lesson if you can. Make sure your battery is charged, the tape is loaded and the tripod is ready to go when you get there. You don't want to waste time fooling around setting up the camera.

Spend some time on gamesmanship. Making shots comes from repetition. Knowledge of playing the game has to come, either from experience or from someone else. IMO, this is the most valuable thing they have to offer.

Take into account their personality. Anyone who reaches that level has to be comfortable with long hours of practice alone. So, they are basically all introverted to some degree. You have to do something to get them talking. This is where the list will help a lot. It's not carved in stone, but it helps get the ball rolling.

Sometimes, just getting them started is enough. They will unload a mountain of information. Hence the camcorder. Other times you will have to pick every single thing out of them. Learning to work with them to get what you want is a skill unto itself.

You can go a long way towards getting your moneys worth by preparing yourself as a student. Hope this helps.

LARRY_BOY
06-22-2005, 11:18 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> I have done this with a couple of well known pros. The most important part is for you to define specific goals before you get in front of them. Just wanting to shoot good is too general. Make a list of questions or problem shots you want to work on. This will give them something to get started to work with you. Carry a camcorder and tape the lesson if you can. Make sure your battery is charged, the tape is loaded and the tripod is ready to go when you get there. You don't want to waste time fooling around setting up the camera.

Spend some time on gamesmanship. Making shots comes from repetition. Knowledge of playing the game has to come, either from experience or from someone else. IMO, this is the most valuable thing they have to offer.

Take into account their personality. Anyone who reaches that level has to be comfortable with long hours of practice alone. So, they are basically all introverted to some degree. You have to do something to get them talking. This is where the list will help a lot. It's not carved in stone, but it helps get the ball rolling.

Sometimes, just getting them started is enough. They will unload a mountain of information. Hence the camcorder. Other times you will have to pick every single thing out of them. Learning to work with them to get what you want is a skill unto itself.

You can go a long way towards getting your moneys worth by preparing yourself as a student. Hope this helps. <hr /></blockquote>

Prety much sums it up......

Stretch
06-22-2005, 03:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote feetdoc:</font><hr> well then if there is no difference then why cant womne compete with the men ? and anyways the women are easier to look at during the lesson <hr /></blockquote>

Ok now we're getting to the real issue. You want to know whether Karen is worth 75 dollars to look at.....not to flatering are ya. My advice? save you (and her) the time and money. Deffinately DON'T get lessons from her. St.

Gayle in MD
06-23-2005, 06:16 AM
Karen worked with me in New York, at Fran's workshop. She is an excellent instructor. She is very organized, concise, and able to zero in on any flaws, from stance to stroke to aim. I highly recommend Karen.

I have been very lucky to have had instruction from Scott Lee, Fran Crimi, Karen Corr and Julie Kelly. Each one has given me valuable information, and insight. Something different from each.

BTW, Karen is working on her instructors BCA certification.

$75.00 for an hour with Karen is a steal, IMO.

Gayle in Md.

catscradle
06-24-2005, 06:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote feetdoc:</font><hr> well then if there is no difference then why cant womne compete with the men ? and anyways the women are easier to look at during the lesson <hr /></blockquote>

I don't know what you're trying to get at here, but I figure that whether or not the women pros can regularly beat the men pros has nothing to do with the question as to whether or not she'd be a good instructor. As a matter of fact I would guess most good instructors can't beat the pros on a regular basis.
If have no idea if Karen is a good instructor, but whether she is or not has nothing to do with what her sex is or for that matter it has nothing to do with the fact that she's a pro. The best instructor I've had so far was not the best player of the instructors I've had I don't think, but he was a damn good instructor and helped my game a lot.
I think it is all about the personalities of the instructor and the student in question. Some mesh, some don't.

meadaball
06-24-2005, 08:09 AM
I am what you cue chalk boardies call a newby. I am not new to the pool scene. I took lessons for 6 months. Having served the public schools in America for several years in the math department, playing pool came a little easier for me. My instructor is a great gentleman and a fine teacher. I am now playing in an APA league, as a sl-6. My teacher gets all the credit, he is the one who molded me into an intermediate player. $1200 is a lot of money, however amazing my friends and sometimes my competitors, makes the spent monies worth it. Having fun does cost money.

Being a professional teacher, I've heard the saying, "I'd give anything to do that", numerous times in my life.