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Fred Agnir
06-22-2005, 09:00 AM
I think the basic difference between a coach and an instructor is the theory of revolution vs. evolution. An instructor teaches new things (revolution). A coach refines what you've got (evolution). There's an overlap, but I think that these two concepts are what separates a coach and an instructor.

In both cases, communication is paramount.

Fred

Tom_In_Cincy
06-22-2005, 11:00 AM
And, IMO, they can be one in the same.

Starts out as an Instructor and then continues the relationship as a coach.

LARRY_BOY
06-22-2005, 11:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> I think the basic difference between a coach and an instructor is the theory of revolution vs. evolution. An instructor teaches new things (revolution). A coach refines what you've got (evolution). There's an overlap, but I think that these two concepts are what separates a coach and an instructor.

In both cases, communication is paramount.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

Once again "the voice of reason " shares his wisdom. Good answer for a techinical question. Thank you!

BillPorter
06-22-2005, 02:30 PM
Can't resist pitching in my $.02. The word "instructor" is more general than the word "coach." "Instructor" covers all manner of teaching, including an Instructor in college (as a rank below that of Assistant Professor). "Coach," on the other hand, is usually restricted to the domain of sports. Admitedly, the two can overlap. Of course, with pool, we have BCA Instructors, not BCA Coaches. But in that big world out there beyound pool, I believe the distinction I made initially is widely accepted.

Fred Agnir
06-22-2005, 02:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BillPorter:</font><hr> "Coach," on the other hand, is usually restricted to the domain of sports. <hr /></blockquote>My sister is a performing arts professor. When she was on Broadway, she had a vocal coach. She had voice instructors as well at some point. I'm sure others can think of non-sports, but maybe a coach is restricted to performance.

Fred

BillPorter
06-22-2005, 03:42 PM
Yep, I think "performance" is the key. Coaches coach performers or teams of performers. I guess you could have a calculus "coach" if you found yourself competing in some kind of calculus contest. The other distinction that comes to mind is that I have often flown coach, but never flown instructor.

wolfdancer
06-22-2005, 03:55 PM
Fred, "coach" seems to be the latest buzz word. I get several emails a day about coaching, or coaching myself.
I like your distinction though between coaching, and instructing

cuechick
06-23-2005, 03:48 AM
I think your fairly accurate there, I also agree that it can be both. I starting working with someone a few months ago, and it is defiantly a "coaching" relationship. I never think of my time with him as a "lesson" but as a "practice". I have had lessons before and the big difference here, is the ongoing build of knowledge and the structure in which we work. We always play sets and he breaks things down as we go. He also praises me and encourages me when I do the right thing and stops and corrects my mistakes. It is intense and tough and I have learned an incredible amount working with him.
I think coaching is a huge missing link for many players...in every other sport it is the norm, here it is the exception.

pooltchr
06-23-2005, 04:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BillPorter:</font><hr> Of course, with pool, we have BCA Instructors, not BCA Coaches. <hr /></blockquote>

Actually, there are both BCA Instructors and BCA Coaches. The requirements for the two are very different.
I like Fred's early post on the subject. Instructors teach new ideas and concepts...Coaches re-enforce ideas that the student already knows.

BillPorter
06-23-2005, 05:12 AM
I'm curious, how are the requirements different? Just showing my ignorance....

Voodoo Daddy
06-23-2005, 06:36 AM
One is different then the other. A "DRILL INSTUCTOR" will teach those that dont know something and help them achieve that goal. A "STREGNTH COACH" is there not to teach you strength but will guide you to define it. Melding them both would be concidered a MENTOR...which is what I feel I have become over the years. Hope that helped Bill.

caedos
06-23-2005, 06:39 AM
The BCA website gave me an error page today, so there's no cross-check at the moment without calling the main office. Administratively, the BCA coaches only pay a minimal fee with no requirement to attend a Master Academy and no one needs to sign off on them. Instructors attend some version of Master Academy training with a Master Instructor signing off on them, which is then approved by the instructor board at the next general meeting. There are also continuing education requirements to stay in the program as an instructor. Maybe Fran, Randy G, or Tom can clarify since I'm not involved with the process.


c

theinel
06-24-2005, 04:01 AM
I think the words are generally interchangeable but Fred's interpretations are good. I think that people sometimes attach negative feeling to "instructor" because they feel that they know enough that they don't need instruction. I know several good players that I've suggested take "lessons" who have been outright hostile about their not needing "lessons" but when I suggested spending time with a "stroke coach" they were quite open to it. They were not open to being lectured or taught but were quite happy to discuss their philosophies with a fellow expert. It's often just a matter of relativity (or "perspectivity" as I like to call it) and sometimes simple ego.