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Kamixel
06-28-2005, 01:13 PM
Who are some of the best out there?

sliprock
06-28-2005, 07:09 PM
I'm sure that there are a few, but most of the "players" that I know can't spell the word.

art
06-29-2005, 07:29 PM
Melissa Herndon works full time. Other than that I can't think of anyone on the men's or women's tour

vapoolplayer
06-30-2005, 03:42 AM
i believe luc salvas makes his living owning 2 pool halls. if you qualify that as "work", i'd say he's the best working pool player.

also, i think B.J. Ussery still works.

thanks

VAP

tjlmbklr
06-30-2005, 04:45 AM
[ QUOTE ]
i'd say he's the best working pool player<hr /></blockquote>

Well he's the best at clearing the table faster then anyone, that's for sure!

Steve Lipsky
06-30-2005, 09:05 AM
I would have to say that George Breedlove is the best working pool player that I know. He rarely plays in tournaments, but when he does, he's a threat to win. I think he came in 5th place at last year's (2004) BCA Open, beating monsters, and, really, when was the last time you heard his name? And according to Jeanette, he works his ass off all year.

As someone with a job, my honest opinion is that it really doesn't matter much. I think that with a decent amount of practice (say, an hour or two a night), you can play at the top of your game. I was unemployed during half of 2002 and do not remember playing particularly well during that period.

I think the whole thing is kind of exaggerated, to tell the truth, but that's just my opinion...

- Steve

cycopath
06-30-2005, 09:14 AM
What does George do for a living?

Steve Lipsky
06-30-2005, 10:20 AM
As far as I know, he owns something like a furniture warehouse. From what I've heard, he's a very successful businessman and works very hard at it.

- Steve

Popcorn
06-30-2005, 10:35 AM
The working player, providing they aren't digging ditches, may actually have an advantage over the player struggling to eek out a living playing pool. They can travel more comfortably, have less pressure and may have a healthier attitude toward the game. Once you reach a certain level it is not all that hard to maintain that high level of play. The learning years you would have put into the game when you are building your game, are usually every persons irresponsible years anyway, so making a good living was probably not that high on your list of priorities. As an adult though, if one has achieved a high level of play, they can easily work at a job and play pool as a second job. It is certainly easier if you are self employed but even the clock puncher can hit a number of tournaments a year and make a good accounting of themselves, again without a lot of the pressures of the player with nothing else to depend on. Off the top of my head, Jack Colavito (sp) comes to mind as a guy who worked and played very well.

Eric.
06-30-2005, 12:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Off the top of my head, Jack Colavito (sp) comes to mind as a guy who worked and played very well. <hr /></blockquote>

Quite a few come to mind, including Jack Colavita;

Steve Mizerak, Joe Balsis, Pots N Pans, Bill Stanton, our own Dick Leonard...


Eric

rocky
06-30-2005, 01:00 PM
What about Neil Fujiwara sales manager at Predator he is one of the top players in the country, not to mention Charlie Williams who works running his own promotions company Dragon Promotions when he is not playing.

Scott Lee
06-30-2005, 09:51 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> As far as I know, he owns something like a furniture warehouse. From what I've heard, he's a very successful businessman and works very hard at it.

- Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Actually Steve, it is not a warehouse, but a small manufacturing plant, making "unpainted" furniture to sell wholesale. There used to be lots of 'unpainted furniture' stores around the country (we had one here in Bozeman for years), but they seem to be dying off for some reason. George has always been a top player, and one smart enough to realize that there is NO money in pro pool...at least for anyone but the top 10 players in the country. Very poor player sponsorship (with a couple of exceptions), no big tournament sponsors, gambling is a dead end, and the only consistent income is generated by people like me, who travel and do exhibitions. George is smart enough to know this...plus Jeanette is doing pretty well doing exhibitions too! She sure the heck isn't making money on the 'tour'! LOL

Scott Lee

tateuts
06-30-2005, 10:10 PM
The biggest disadvantage I see being a working stiff is just feeling like playing after a tough day at the office and catching a gear. The guys I play who don't work or who have jobs that are less intense seem to have no trouble unwinding and getting into the game. Sometimes I'm so keyed up it takes me several hours to just to relax and get into it. If I'm pre-occupied or tired it's hard to really kick into high gear.


Chris

Voodoo Daddy
06-30-2005, 10:39 PM
Irving Crane sold Caddys...My choice is a seasoned veteran named John DiToro. I know John for 25 years, always had a job and played superman pool for decades. Still works to this day and cash's often when he plays.

catscradle
07-01-2005, 04:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr> Irving Crane sold Caddys... <hr /></blockquote>

Was his #1 customer Burt from the Hustler? It must have been a caddy.

"See that big car parked out by the fireplug on the way in? Well, that's mine. I like that car... I get a new one every year..."

<font color="brown"> FWIW, I got that quote online. The full screenplay is at Hustler screenplay (http://sfy.ru/sfy.html?script=hustler1961) </font color>

catscradle
07-01-2005, 04:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> The biggest disadvantage I see being a working stiff is just feeling like playing after a tough day at the office and catching a gear. The guys I play who don't work or who have jobs that are less intense seem to have no trouble unwinding and getting into the game. Sometimes I'm so keyed up it takes me several hours to just to relax and get into it. If I'm pre-occupied or tired it's hard to really kick into high gear.


Chris <hr /></blockquote>

I know that a hard day at work, leaving me uptight and distracted waiting for the cell phone on my hip to start vibrating definitely effects my game. I would assume the same is true for better players.