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Drop1
07-03-2005, 11:27 AM
What makes one tip better than the next, is there really a difference,or is it subjective. Is the idea to have a certain shape,and hold chalk. Is a hard tip better for certain shots,over other shots? Is there a glue of choice for layered tips?

Troy
07-03-2005, 12:33 PM
The choice of which tip to use is mostly personal -- what you like is the right tip for you.
The same goes for shape but most 8&9-Ball players prefer a hard, flat tip for breaking.
I use LocktiteŽ Quicktite Gel or 454 Gel to attach all tips on customer cues and my cues.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> What makes one tip better than the next, is there really a difference,or is it subjective. Is the idea to have a certain shape,and hold chalk. Is a hard tip better for certain shots,over other shots? Is there a glue of choice for layered tips? <hr /></blockquote>

ras314
07-03-2005, 03:16 PM
I would be more concerned with what type of glue works with which ferrule material than glue of choice for a given tip. Ask the cue manufacture what glue to use if possible.

Billy_Bob
07-03-2005, 07:04 PM
For me, I want a *consistent* tip - always!

Especially for draw shots.

Draw shots are a good test of different tips and tip shapes, however people are not perfect enough to shoot exactly the same many times in a row, so you would need a robot to do the testing.

So I want a good tip and tip shape which draws well, then other than that, I want it to be consistent. Then I can go about practicing drawing the cue ball back specific distances. If the tip is slick, not well chalked, a new different shape, etc., it can cause trouble and inconsistency if you ask me...

So I *always* use the same brand and hardness of tip, and always keep my tip the same shape. I only resurface it with a sandpaper shaper about once a week, then lightly - never do anything else. Always chalk well before each shot, especially around sides of tip.

cheese_ball
07-05-2005, 02:23 PM
Billy_Bob-

What exactly is a "consistent" tip? I have personally tested boxes upon boxes of leather tips to find such a thing with NO AVAIL!!! Leather is an organic material, and therefore is NEVER going to be perfect. Try taking a tip and putting it in a durometer. Now, put the SAME TIP back in the durometer with the testing ball on a different part of the tip... guess what you will find... you get a different reading! Now, what about different hardness ratings from tips in the SAME box? How big of a range (rockwell) do you think there is?

pooltchr
07-06-2005, 04:41 AM
Good point, Cheese. I don't think you can find two identical tips in a box of 50! Now here's another thought. I have had the opportunity to try many cues with different tips, and most tips seem to react pretty much the same way (ok...not counting elk masters!). Cue ball response is much more a matter of stroke than the kind of tip on the end of the cue. If it's well shaped and has chalk on it, I can usually get the cue ball to do what I ask of it.
Steve

ceebee
07-06-2005, 07:33 AM
I have tried different laminated tips, LePros, Elk Masters &amp; Triangles... I like the medium-hard Triangle for consistant hit &amp; long life.

Billy_Bob
07-06-2005, 08:09 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cheese_ball:</font><hr> Billy_Bob- What exactly is a "consistent" tip?... <hr /></blockquote>

Well maybe I can't exactly explain "consistent", but I can explain what is "not consistent" and what has given me and other players trouble in the past.

1. I was having problems with draw shots (drawing an exact distance that is). I would "tip tap" my tip and/or scuff it with a scuffer. Right after scuffing/tip tapping, I would get more draw which would transition to less draw as the tip became slick. Not good. Solution: I now just lightly sand with a sandpaper shaper about once a week and that is it. My tip is much more consistent so far as the condition of the surface is concerned. BIG improvement!

2. Shape of tip. Problem is not keeping the tip a specific shape, then getting a new tip installed, then tip installer gives tip a specific shape which is different from old tip. New tip plays differently. Solution: Always keep tip a specific shape and give new tip same shape. New tip plays same as old tip. BIG improvement!

3. Brand/hardness of tip. Not knowing what brand of tip you have currently installed or what hardness it is. Then get a new tip installed and not knowing what brand or hardness that the tip is. The new tip may be different from the old tip and may play differently. Solution: Select a specific brand tip/hardness, then always have that same tip installed. BIG improvement.

4. Other than the above, I would just say that I think pig skin tips are better in that after resurfacing, there is not that much difference in the surface. Whereas with cow leather tips, after resurfacing/scuffing, there are little "hairs" or "strands" sticking up here and there. Then after a bit of play, the hairs matt down. So this is not good as the tip is changing from slick, to hairy, to matted down.

5. Having a consistent tip (or a more consistent tip) will do nothing for a beginning player who always uses a center ball hit. But what it does for me is to always play the same basically. This allows me to practice and get fairly good at drawing the cue ball back specific distances.

So I can draw the cue ball back say 1 ft. accurately many times. And sometimes 1 ft. rather than 6 inches or 2 ft. can mean the difference between getting position on my next shot or not. And that "little" extra advantage can help me to win a match. (I need all the help I can get...)

What I am trying to do is eliminate as many variables as possible is all. Of course I can't do anything about the table cloth or condition of the cue ball, but practicing beforehand helps me adjust to a specific table.

Scott Lee
07-06-2005, 04:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> Cue ball response is much more a matter of stroke than the kind of tip on the end of the cue. If it's well shaped and has chalk on it, I can usually get the cue ball to do what I ask of it.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

AMEN! Pooltcher speaks the TRUTH! Any poolplayer with a decent stroke can draw the CB...even with a house cue. It makes NO difference what brand, size, hardness, or shape.
It's all about having a repeatable, sustainable stroke...which, imo, everyone can learn, and anyone can master; given the proper disciplined practice!

Scott

Ralph S.
07-07-2005, 09:29 AM
Billybob...have you ever met Scott Lee? IF not, when you get the chance, if desired, ask him about his drawing drill. This drill will provide dramatic results almost instantly.

Billy_Bob
07-07-2005, 10:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ralph S.:</font><hr> Billybob...have you ever met Scott Lee? IF not, when you get the chance, if desired, ask him about his drawing drill. This drill will provide dramatic results almost instantly. <hr /></blockquote>

Never met him. (I did a search on this though...)

Is that the drill where he draws the cue ball with a sledgehammer break cue?

I recall reading somewhere that someone could draw quite well with a break cue - I tried it and could draw just as far with my break cue as with my regular cue. Note that my playing cue is a dime shape and my break cue is a quarter shape, so I think I had to hit the cue ball in a slightly different spot as I recall (than with my regular cue).

pooltchr
07-07-2005, 10:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> I recall reading somewhere that someone could draw quite well with a break cue - I tried it and could draw just as far with my break cue as with my regular cue. Note that my playing cue is a dime shape and my break cue is a quarter shape, so I think I had to hit the cue ball in a slightly different spot as I recall (than with my regular cue).
<hr /></blockquote>

So what you are saying is that regardless of the shape or hardness of the tip, you can still draw the ball just as well????
That is the point I am continually trying to make....it's not the cue or the tip....it's all about the mechanics of the stroke.
Thank you for helping me make my point!
Steve

Billy_Bob
07-07-2005, 10:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr>So what you are saying is that regardless of the shape or hardness of the tip, you can still draw the ball just as well????...<hr /></blockquote>

Yes of course, I can draw well with *any* tip (except maybe phenolic).

But where I had difficulty in the past was drawing a *specific* distance. And this seemed to change depending on the condition of my tip.

So I always play with *my* tip (which is always the same) and get to be quite good at drawing *specific* distances.

However if I go and use a house cue which has a slick and differently shaped tip, then my draw back *distance* will not be what I expect. (House cues around here can be terrible!)

*But* if I always used that house cue, practiced with it etc., then I would get to be quite good at drawing *specific* distances with it.

I'm sure there are other people who frequently switch between different cues and can easily adjust. But I do better always playing with the same cue, tip, etc.

I just see a lot of other players get a new tip, then have problems. But then they do not know what brand/hardness/shape their old tip was, and don't know what brand/hardness/shape their new tip is....

masse9387
07-09-2005, 11:02 AM
The type of tip. Layered/non-layered, skins/hairs, ect. It all depends. Non-layered tips are more common around novice players who are just beginning; however, I have seen experienced playered request Triangles on their shafts. Myself, I currently have a Talisman Med. on my shaft. My daddy, I don't know, since he has sooo many cues. lol. To end it, it's all preference. Good luck