PDA

View Full Version : how to rank yourself



vinnie717
07-13-2005, 02:05 PM
Is there anyway to rank yourself by your high runs or anything like that to tell if ur a a,b or c class player since im too young for leauges.

thank you
vince

tateuts
07-13-2005, 02:41 PM
The best practice to start off with is playing both straight pool and 9 ball. Each of these games give you a different set of skills and dimension to your game.

If you practice straight pool for, say, two or three hours on an average difficulty 9' table (4 3/4" corner pockets) table, I think you could rate your game like this:

I would say a "B" player will run 20 balls in straight pool during this session while an "A" player will run 30 or more balls. Getting into the 40 -50 ball runs gets into expert territory.

Nine ball is much harder to rank. I would say if you can consistenly run 4 or 5 balls on an open 9 ball table with ball in hand, that would be about "B" level. An "A" player will get out probably 50% or 60% of the time (although they like to believe it's more) and an expert probably 80% of the time or more.

Chris

vinnie717
07-13-2005, 03:16 PM
thanks chris for your help i guess im a class mid b player and im turnin 14 in about 4 days (717) so u better look out for me in 2 years.

vince

Plummerbutt
07-13-2005, 11:37 PM
Theres alot more to being an "A" or "B" class player then just being able to run a few balls.

Theres a big difference in being a pool "shooter" and a pool "player".

You will certainly find this out in "2" years.

cheese_ball
07-14-2005, 06:33 AM
Simple answer... there are several single player games that work on your skills and give you a good idea of your skill level. Try playing the ghost (otherwise known as 99) for starters.

vinnie717
07-14-2005, 06:55 AM
thanks for your reply but what do u mean by this?

vince

pooltchr
07-14-2005, 07:36 AM
I think his point is there is a difference between knowing how to play, and knowing how to win. Much of it has to do with your mental game, attitude, ability to perform under pressure, control your emotions, and handle both the good and bad rolls you are going to encounter in the game.
Steve

vinnie717
07-14-2005, 09:56 AM
ohh ok thank you for your explanation.


vince

BigRigTom
07-14-2005, 10:23 AM
Vinnie I had the same question and someone on this board a while back suggested a method of ranking based on the number of balls you can run in 14-1

It went something like this
Break the rack of 15 balls, then take ball in hand behind the head string and see how many balls you can run.
If you fail to pocket a ball the run stops and you re-rack the 15 balls and start over.
After you have done this execise 10 times (missed 10 times) you total you 10 scores and divide by 10 to get your average # of balls run.
Then there is a chart to determine what level of player you are "skill wise".

Believe me though this is only a rudimentary ranking system and when you play a REAL match against ....say... even a "B" player you will see what that "B" player really looks like. There is a lot more to pool that just sinking balls.

I am sure someone will recognize the ranking system I have described and "hopefully" will jump in an correct any errors in my description. You also need that chart to determine your ranking. I believe this system was devised to give players a method of gaging their level during practice work out and then they can grade themselves in an attempt to improve the practice routines....etc...etc....etc

Billy_Bob
07-14-2005, 12:00 PM
I found this on the internet somewhere...

Player Ratings...

OPEN-Players
-Average 8+ balls.
-String racks together more than once in a match.
-Is a threat to run out from every ball, from every position, every inning.
-Typical inning will end in excellent safety or win.

A-Player
-Will string 2 to 3 racks.
-Average ball run, 7-9.
-With ball in hand, will be out from the 3 ball, 2 out of 3 times.
-Typical inning will end with a well executed safety or a win.

B-Player
-Able to run 1 to 3 racks.
-Average run is 5-7 balls.
-With ball in hand will get out form the 5, 2 out of 3 times.
-Most of the time a "B" player will play a "safety" which maybe hit easily 2 out of 3 times.
-A typical inning will end with a missed shot, a fair safety, or a won game.

C-Player
-Will probably run one rack, but usually not more than one.
-Average run is 3 to 5 balls.
-With ball in hand, will get out from the 7, two out of 3 times.
-Mixed results when playing safe.
-Inning ends due to botched position, missed shot or attempting a safe.

D- Player
-Will not run a rack.
-Average run is about 3 balls.
-With ball in hand, will get out from the 7, one out of 3 times.
-Rarely plays a successful safe.

Bob_Jewett
07-14-2005, 12:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote vinnie717:</font><hr> Is there anyway to rank yourself by your high runs or anything like that to tell if ur a a,b or c class player since im too young for leauges.

thank you
vince <hr /></blockquote>

Hi Vince,

Which games do you play usually? What size of table? Do you have a chance to play on a 9-foot table?

Plummerbutt
07-14-2005, 06:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote vinnie717:</font><hr> thanks for your reply but what do u mean by this?

vince <hr /></blockquote>

What I mean vince is this. Anyone who plays pool regularly has the potential to run several balls. However, that doesn't mean they are a good enought pool player to consistantly win against an opponant. A pool shooter ONLY shoots balls until he covers himself or fails to break a cluster.., opponant takes over and wins.

Now, a pool PLAYER would be able to recognize the potential danger with the cluster and work every shot with intentions of breaking it up, not just running open balls, but always looking ahead for the opportunity to run out. When its not there, play a safty. Sometimes your best shot is a purposeful miss so your opponant can break up a troublsome cluster that will give you the chance at open balls.

A pool SHOOTER wants to run balls and has a set mentality that says "run as many as possible and hope for the best." This will win enough games to keep them interested in the sport and let them believe they are pretty good, but will not stand up to players who are even slightly better or slightly more expirienced.

A pool PLAYER has the mentality that says "I will run out if opportunity presents itself. If not I will still win by playing smart safties and picking my time to run out." This player knows how to shoot, how to manage the cue ball, how to leave himself as well as his opponant. This player is usually in the money at local tournies and can be recognized by thier slow, deliberate, confident play. One word describes this type of player.., expirienced!

I play many locals who are very good SHOOTERS, but thats where thier game ends. Occasionally I loose to this type of player, but not very often. In most cases they actually end up giving me the game.., and don't even realize it or how it happened.

A, B, C.., its all great. But nothing replaces expirience!

Barbara
07-14-2005, 06:29 PM
Tap Tap Tap!!

Barbara

Cane
07-14-2005, 07:20 PM
PB, EXCELLENT POST!!!

Later,
Bob

vinnie717
07-14-2005, 07:37 PM
oh ok i get i guess im more of a shooter since i only have about half year experience.But i can break out clusters sometimes.
vince

Cane
07-14-2005, 07:44 PM
Vinnie, Everyone was a "shooter" at one point in their pool life. I started playing when I was 8 years old, learned a lot at that age from a road player that was a friend of my Dad's. I was a "shooter" until I was 17 or 18... got pretty serious, then. I quit playing altogether when I was 31 years old. Didn't pick up a cue again until 4 months after my 44th birthday. Guess what... I was no longer a player. I was a shooter again. Proper instruction and guidance have changed all that. It takes time to become a player... and, as one older gentleman told me once, "5000 miles around the table". No shame in being a shooter. The "player" part will come with time, experience and IMO, proper instruction will shorten the learning curve.

Later,
Bob

vinnie717
07-14-2005, 07:49 PM
ok thanks again for ur reply but y did u quit ive heard of people quitting just like that y did u quit?
vince

Cane
07-14-2005, 08:42 PM
Vinnie, Ready for a LONG story???? There's no short answer to your question in my case, so her it is.

Pool, or more specifically, being the kind of pool player that I was, had cost me 2 divorces and at that time, I had another pending. I decided it was time to quit travelling and hustling 3 ball runners in dives and bars and get a "normal life" and try to save that marriage (which I did save it for another 11 years... it eventually fell apart anyways). I led that "normal life" and worked as an Engineer for a major corporation for 10 years. I had some good luck with a few "moves" and was able to retire completely in 1998... except for a somewhat lucrative hobby I have, making bamboo fly rods, but that's more fun than work.

I always missed playing, but when I retired in 98, I didn't know anything of pool other than what I'd done before and I didn't want to go back to sleeping in flea bag motels on good days and the back seat of my car on bad days, so I just stayed out of pool until April of 2003.

One night that April, I was in a night club with my girlfriend and there was a young lady there from Tulsa that wanted to play pool and nobody would play. Billie, my girlfriend, told me to play her, so I picked up a cue for the first time in 14 years and lost the first game miserably. I actually got mad! Billie then told me that this lady was one of Tulsa's top female shooters, and I cocked up and said, "Well, she won't beat me again". We played from 8pm until well after the bar closed. The band had come down from the stage and they, along with about 20 of the regulars, the bartenders and the bar manager watched us play rack after rack of 8-ball, with the doors locked. We played until nearly 5 in the morning. I lost a few racks, but not many. I made my point, but also, I was like a crack addict in a DEA storage facility. I was hooked again!!!

The next day, I went to a cue dealer in Arkansas and bought a nice cue and the quest was on... it continues today. In the past three years, I've literally played THOUSANDS of hours, practiced thousands of hours... the most important thing I did was go to a qualified BCA Instructor to learn the game the right way. Even though I played since I was 8 years old (with the exception of those 14 years in hiding), I had never learned anything about pool except how to match up and be sure I got the nuts.

As a young man, there were a lot of things about pool that I just didn't know, and, as I would find out, there were a lot of things I believed and trusted as "truisms" of pool that were just plain false. Randy Goettlicher (CCB's RandyG) of Cue Tech Pool School in Dallas changed that. He got me started on the right road with the right knowledge. I've been to his Advanced Class, his Expert Class and he Certified me as a BCA Instructor. To be honest, there are several people that are responsible for me getting on the proper road, Randy G., Jerry Powers, Carl Oswald, Leslie Rogers, Hal Houle, and even CCB's own veteran Dick Leonard, who spotted a flaw that he saw in a picture of me playing that I immediately cured and it brought my game up a ball or so.

The list will get bigger and bigger. I'm going to be working alongside Scott Lee and pooltchr in October, and I KNOW I'll learn something from them. If Hal ever gets his house sold in California, I plan to have him as my guest and my teacher in my home for a few days. I have plans to (ready for this Fran) seek out Fran Crimi and learn anything she's willing to teach me. I've emailed Bob Jewett, a CCB Poster and one of the most well known BCA Master Instructors in the world and would like to get instruction from him when I can do a trip to California. I don't EVER want to quit learning about pool.

Only one thing has changed... I don't want to be the kind of pool player I was before. I want something more out of the game. I want to play the best possible game I can every time I pick up a cue, and my long term goal is to be a proficient tournament player... not local tournaments, but I want to be able to walk into great tournaments and make my mark. Yeah, I'm damn near 50 and it won't be easy, but then again, nothing worth having is easy... and I think my vision, or dream, of playing great pool is worth having and worth working hard to achieve.

Now, see what you've done! You got me started rambling! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I'm really bad about that, especially when it comes to pocket billiards. I have a passion for this sport/game that is nearly unparalelled. I've met a few that love it as much as I do, but none that I believe love it more. How much to I love the game... well, everytime I get within 100 miles of Dallas, I'll "detour" by Pool School to drop in and visit with Randy and the other instructors there. I love to talk pool almost as much as I love to play it... Randy is one of the few people I know whose passion for the game rivals my own. I'll only play pool under two conditions... daylight or dark. My favorite game... whatever we're playing next.

Later,
Bob

nhp
07-15-2005, 02:17 AM
You become a pool player once you start taking the game seriously, once you learn how to respect your opponent and the equipment, and once you start caring about how you perform when you win instead of only caring about winning.

There are tons of inexperienced pool 'players' out there who are players rather than shooters because they have great etiquette and respect for the game, and they try to learn as much as they can.

There are also a ton of people who play very good that don't fall into the 'player' category because they don't have any etiquette and they only thing they give a [censored] about is winning.

vinnie717
07-15-2005, 04:17 AM
wow intresting stories i always like hearing stories anything about pool and i also cant live with somebody that can beat me on a regular basis and that drives me crazy and get in trouble by my mom for staying out late.and one more question if u dont mind what is 3 ball?


vince

Cane
07-15-2005, 04:54 AM
Vinnie, there is a gave called three ball, but when I said 3 ball runners, I meant that I'd search out players whose limit was running three balls in a row.

As for the game three ball... some pool rooms will have regular 3 ball tournaments. Pay an entry and you get a specific number of rounds. The idea is to break and make three balls in as few shots as possible. Never was much on 3 ball, maybe someone else could explain it better.

Later,
Bob

DickLeonard
07-15-2005, 05:59 AM
Cane, I have three people I idolize. Number one Grandma Moses who started painting at age 79. I still have twelve years to get as great as her.

Number two, Onifrio Laurie who was leading the 1971 Worlds Championship with a 15-0 record,when the earthquake hit California and it shook so, that he lost his last three games and the title.

Sam Snead the golfer,who won his last tourney at age 62 and not on the senior tour.####

BigRigTom
07-15-2005, 07:48 AM
Looks to me like everyone forgot the question. Here it is again... /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote vinnie717:</font><hr> Is there anyway to rank yourself by your high runs or anything like that to tell if ur a a,b or c class player since im too young for leauges.

thank you
vince <hr /></blockquote>

Those are truly interesting stories and I bet everyone who has played pool a long time has to have a few of those. The game is more than a game and the longer one plays the more one appreciates that fact. Becoming a really good player will make you a better person and being a better person will help you become a better player.

Any system that allows you to gage for yourself your own advancement in skills is a good one but the only true measure of your playing ability will come from playing competitive matches against members of the given group in which you wish to be rated.

That may sound like fluff but a good player in the APA may not be quite as good a player in the BCA. Of course once you get to a certain level then you can compete in any group.....I believe that is where most of us would like to be....at a point that we can play a respectible match against anyone and hold our heads high win or lose. At least that is where I aspire to be. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Jimmy B
07-17-2005, 10:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote vinnie717:</font><hr> Is there anyway to rank yourself by your high runs or anything like that to tell if ur a a,b or c class player since im too young for leauges.

thank you
vince <hr /></blockquote>

Worry more about your game and winning then a lable, I'd much rather be a D player and beat everyone then the A player who doesn't play anyone and sits in the corner telling everyone how he's an A player.

JB &lt;-----Low C

justbrake
07-18-2005, 03:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote vinnie717:</font><hr> Is there anyway to rank yourself by your high runs or anything like that to tell if ur a a,b or c class player since im too young for leauges.

thank you
vince <hr /></blockquote>

try this!
http://infohost.nmt.edu/~billiard/qskills_scorecard.html

BigRigTom
07-18-2005, 09:02 AM
That is quite an elaborate method and no doubt it will give you a system to track you progress toward improving but do you know how to relate those scores to the A thru D rating system that is referred to by a lot of people on the CCB?

-or-

Is there another system entirely to determing that rating?

pooltchr
07-18-2005, 09:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> I found this on the internet somewhere...

Player Ratings...

OPEN-Players
-Average 8+ balls.
-String racks together more than once in a match.
-Is a threat to run out from every ball, from every position, every inning.
-Typical inning will end in excellent safety or win.

A-Player
-Will string 2 to 3 racks.
-Average ball run, 7-9.
-With ball in hand, will be out from the 3 ball, 2 out of 3 times.
-Typical inning will end with a well executed safety or a win.

B-Player
-Able to run 1 to 3 racks.
-Average run is 5-7 balls.
-With ball in hand will get out form the 5, 2 out of 3 times.
-Most of the time a "B" player will play a "safety" which maybe hit easily 2 out of 3 times.
-A typical inning will end with a missed shot, a fair safety, or a won game.

C-Player
-Will probably run one rack, but usually not more than one.
-Average run is 3 to 5 balls.
-With ball in hand, will get out from the 7, two out of 3 times.
-Mixed results when playing safe.
-Inning ends due to botched position, missed shot or attempting a safe.

D- Player
-Will not run a rack.
-Average run is about 3 balls.
-With ball in hand, will get out from the 7, one out of 3 times.
-Rarely plays a successful safe.
<hr /></blockquote>

I've seeen this in several different places, and it seems to be a pretty accurate description.
Steve

Cane
07-18-2005, 12:07 PM
I don't put too much stock in ratings, but if you want to do it and have fun at the same time, play Fargo. You can find the rules and rating system or FARGO (http://www.playpool.com/rsbasp/fargo/fargo6.html) here.

Personally, I find this MUCH more enjoyable than the QSkill thing.

Later,
Bob

dg-in-centralpa
07-18-2005, 02:38 PM
I agree with Plummerbutt's definition. Where I live, I'm usually in the top 10 - 15 shooters in 2 different leagues. Does that make me good? I know how every player in my county plays, so I can beat consistently any given time. Does that make me good? At one time I thought so. Until I went out of my comfort zone to a tourney in another county with players from several states around. Out of 5 times at this tourney, I placed in the money once. The other times I wasn't even close. I went to Valley Forge and played 6 times. I came close to placing in the money once. Go out of your area and play people you don't know.

DG - I need to practice more, but work won't allow it /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Jay M
07-19-2005, 05:42 AM
When I was in the Army, I spent every spare moment down at the recreation center on post shooting pool. Constantly... If I wasn't on duty, I was there. I got pretty decent with the help of some of the other players there. When I got out of the Army, I thought I was pretty good and, as it turned out, there were very few players in the area I lived that could beat me in either tournament play or for money. So I decided to play a Florida Pro Tour event.

I went down there and my first match was against a guy from Orlando. I smoked him...7-0. Talk about feeding an ego...lol My next round was against a guy named Tommy Kennedy. I'd never heard of Tommy at the time, so when the rail started filling up while I was warming up and waiting for Tommy to get there, I truly believed that all those people had noticed my first match and were coming over to watch me play. Just as Tommy got to the table, I kicked a ball off the long rail and into the opposite corner leaving myself perfect. Tommy said "Hey! No more of that!" and we laughed... So the match goes on and I'm up on him 6-3. It's alternating break and I sit down. Some guy next to the rail leans over and quietly says to me "WHO are you? You're beating Tommy KENNEDY". To which I replied, "Who is Tommy Kennedy?". The guy by the rail then started listing all of Tommy's accomplishments. I ended up missing three easy 9 ball opportunities and losing that match 7-6.

I guess my point is that the pressure can get to you, especially when you know the caliber of player you are up against. It took a LONG time to get over that, many many tournaments lost early before I started getting close to the money rounds. Don't get me wrong, I'm not a world-beater, especially now with 12 months off the table, but I was at least getting somewhat close before I moved.

Jay M

Voodoo Daddy
07-19-2005, 06:34 AM
Judge Smails: Ty, what did you shoot today?
Ty Webb: Oh, Judge, I don't keep score.
Judge Smails: Then how do you measure yourself with other golfers?
Ty Webb: By height.


Moral of the story; Dont matter what you rank yourself or how others rank you...what matters is your humbleness and a lil sarcasm helps, HAHAHA /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif