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View Full Version : 4th tournament - long



06-15-2002, 06:44 PM
I played in my 4th handicap tournament Thur. The 5 handicap that beat me last week wanted to practice around 7:10. The tournaments are scheduled to start at 8:00 and you can practice for free from 7:00. We played and he started out winning either 3-1 or 5-2. Then I started catching up. He was still outshooting me. But I was winning more games. Then it seemed as if I was breaking more and more. Maybe I was shooting about even with him now. And about 8:10 I said that's all for me. Thanks for giving me the good practice. Good luck tonight. I think I won about 3 or 4 more games then he did.

And usually the tournaments start about 8:20 or 8:30 the latest. I like to wipe off my stick with a paper towel. Or I use the Q Wiz burnishing side and then wipe it off with a paper towel. Then I was my hands and wait for the start. I payed a 4 1/2. He beat me 4 to 1. Again it seemed like I was the first table finished.

I watched for a couple hours. I talked with a few players I know now. This 6 1/2 was playing another 6 1/2. The first is the better player and better shooter. More consistant. Better capable or running a rack. A little better position player. And he seems to get shooting good a little more often then the other player. I did learn a little from this. Early in racks he would often play safe instead of trying to make a makeable, but not easy bank shot or a difficult but makable shot. He said against someone like this, that is capable of running them, I never try to run the table unless they break and settle really well and wide open.

I definitely don't play like that. When we played in our games in the 60s, everyone almost always tried to make anything. But we weren't that good. And we usually played 9 ball on the weekends with 3 or 4 players. Shows how bad we all were. But everything we played back then, we would almost always try to make a shot. Except in straight pool. That was the only game we used any safety play. It was just considered poor sportmanship or worst to play safe in 9 ball games. Maybe I should get that out of my head. But it wouldn't feel right if I started playing safe in 9 ball, especially against the 4, 5, or 6 handicaps. Maybe I will need to change that attitude. But I think what I really need most right now is to get in more time shooting. By myself or agains someone. It doesn't matter now. I only was able to get in one, 5 hour practice session in the 3 weeks since I started watching and playing in these tournaments. And then in the 4 tournaments I usually practice for a 1/2 hour or 45 minutes before the start. Then I clean up. And I've been getting eliminated quickly. So I get less then 1 1/2 hours playing only twice a week. That's definitely not enough right now for me. I often see some of the losers get on one of the open unused tables after they lose. And they play by themselves for a couple hours without paying. But I don't know if it is supposed to be that way. It doesn't seem right. And the owner usually has one of the counter workers go collect the balls from the tables that won't be being used in the tournament any more. But I even see some of the older men in the open tournament quickly grab an open table or just keep playing on their table if it won't be used. This is after they lose. But I just watch some of the games or maybe talk a little to a couple of the players or young counter guys I'm getting to know. My funds are really too limited right now to just pay $5 an hour to practice for a few hours after I lose. That's why when I practice I wait for one of the daily specials here or at the other place I started out practicing at. Here I can play from 2:00 am til 8:00 am for $10. But those hours are completely dead and I didn't feel comfortable the one time I played then. And from 8:00 am til 5:00 pm is only $5 here. My my stomach is often unsettled in the morning hours and I can't seem to make it then too much. And the other place I was practicing at only charges $6 on Mon to Fri from 12:00 pm until 8:00 pm. But I just haven't been able to make it with all my wife's and my doctor's appointments, and my leagal appotintments lately. Maybe I'm just being to cheap. But money is tight and will be getting tighter soon. I may just have to settle for playing just the tournaments or maybe only once a week for a few months. And then with some luck I might get the time to put in my needed playing & practicing.

Harold Acosta
06-16-2002, 09:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Eddie G Chgo:</font><hr>
I definitely don't play like that. When we played in our games in the 60s, everyone almost always tried to make anything. But we weren't that good. And we usually played 9 ball on the weekends with 3 or 4 players. Shows how bad we all were. But everything we played back then, we would almost always try to make a shot. Except in straight pool. That was the only game we used any safety play. It was just considered poor sportmanship or worst to play safe in 9 ball games. Maybe I should get that out of my head. But it wouldn't feel right if I started playing safe in 9 ball, especially against the 4, 5, or 6 handicaps. Maybe I will need to change that attitude. But I think what I really need most right now is to get in more time shooting. By myself or agains someone. It doesn't matter now. <hr></blockquote>

Eddie, you will definitely have to change your mind about not playing safe, regardless of whom you are playing. If you want to advance to the next round, you will have to change your game and play the safeties. Your objective should be to win games, not lose them because you are trying to make all shots. If you keep leaving the safeties out of your game you will be losing a lot of games and matches.


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Eddie G Chgo:</font><hr>

I often see some of the losers get on one of the open unused tables after they lose. And they play by themselves for a couple hours without paying. But I don't know if it is supposed to be that way. It doesn't seem right. And the owner usually has one of the counter workers go collect the balls from the tables that won't be being used in the tournament any more. But I even see some of the older men in the open tournament quickly grab an open table or just keep playing on their table if it won't be used. This is after they lose. But I just watch some of the games or maybe talk a little to a couple of the players or young counter guys I'm getting to know. My funds are really too limited right now to just pay $5 an hour to practice for a few hours after I lose. <hr></blockquote>


Eddie, if everyone is playing on the open tables, why not do it yourself? What can you lose? The other players who are practicing in other tables have a slight advantage over you in the tournament because they keep practicing for their next game. If you just stand by, you are wasting precious time. Forget about what is right or wrong with open tables, that is for the owner to decide.

Ward
06-16-2002, 09:32 AM
Eddie

I like you had a long layoff from pool. When I started back the saftey play was new to me. I have a friend with whom I practice ask me if I would want to coach a football team and leave the defense at home. That made sense to me so I learned how to play safe. Mike Siegel has a nine-ball tape in which he explains that when you go to the table you should look at the layout and decide if you can run out, if you are not comfortable in your ability to run out you should decide at that time where to play your saftey. It takes some practice but I think it is good advise.

Later
Ward

Tom_In_Cincy
06-16-2002, 09:37 AM
Eddie,
Safety play is a big factor in today's 9 ball games. I would suggest getting some of the Accustats videos and watching the pros play safeties. Safeties need to be part of your game as much as draw or follow.

As far as using a table to practice or play, during the tournament or after you have lost, just ask the TD what is the policy? is it ok to continue to practice?

heater451
06-16-2002, 04:30 PM
I was introduced to 'safeties', like I imagine many players were/are, during league play (BCA rules)--in eight ball.

Since my game focused on the more offensive side, I shot safeties when I was forced into it. Eventually, I trained myself to consider defense more quickly--notably, whenever I felt that "I didn't have a (good) shot"--That is, if my choice was a low-percentage bank or kick. The point is, recognizing when to shoot a safety is the first step to doing it. After that, you will become better, and more comfortable, at it.

Even now, I tend towards the offensive style of play, but I also notice when it is much easier to shoot a safety, when my goal isn't to attempt a run-out, but to insure that my opponent can't.

I don't necessarily think of a safety shot as screwing your opponent any more, but as gaining control of the table. (I've seen a friend get his rear powdered and perfumed by another guy, during a 3-foul-loss tourney).

Just and example of a time a safety worked hand in had (along with some luck):

The tournament was 9-ball, APA-rules, modified handicap (1/2-races). My opponent was 11-handicap, while I was listed as a 5 or 6 (I think the spread was enought, that it was a 7-4 race).

I was down to the 7 and 9 to go, and no easy way to pot the 7. I can't recall exactly how the balls were set up, but I know that the balls were close together in the corner, something like this, where I pushed the 7 into the 9/rail (there was no cut on it):

START(%Gq6G8%In9D6%Pr3I3%Yp5E9%Zq6G4)END

Anyway, my opponent ended up with something like this--Again, my memory fails, since my diagram may leave a better shot. He really had no non-scratch option, so he pushed the 7 back towards the 9:

START(%Gq6D2%In7D4%Pr7E3%Wq1D0%Xq6D1%_s7C2%`r3D3%a r5E3)END

This left me ball-in-hand, with the 7/9 in a combination to the side for the win (my second):

START(%Go4D0%In5E0%Pq3C9%W[7[6%Xn0E7%_l3C4%`o5C9%aq3D1)END

I got to the hill first (of course, I only needed 3 to do that), and he had 2. Then, he picked up like the 11 that he was supposed to be, and started shooting methodically/mechanically. I remember that he ran one rack in the rest of the match, and I got one or two misses (at the most), before he ran out in the other games. It was a pleasure to watch him 'catch his ride' for the win.

Anyway, back to safety play in general, it doesn't hurt to have it in your arsenal, whether you use it often or not. It's legal and accepted by most league/tourney players, so it's in your best interest to at least have the option. . . .

Another thing: Play some one-pocket. Even a few games of that, with someone who can tell you how to play, will teach you a lot about defense.

http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/~wei/pool/pooltable2.html

Tom_In_Cincy
06-16-2002, 04:40 PM
Thanks Heater, for the wei table layouts. It does make a difference in the explanation, doesn't it?

heater451
06-16-2002, 05:11 PM
I sometimes try to fit in the picture and the thousand words! /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

BTW, it's strange. . . .I posted two links about the WEI table (yours and mine) to the "Carson" guy, but it evidently didn't make it.