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View Full Version : open vs closed bridge - line of sight and control



ryushen21
07-21-2005, 05:28 PM
I know that there has been a lot of argument over this in the past but i was wondering waht the current thoughts are on the situation.

About two weeks ago i switched to using an open bridge. As far as the line of sight issue is concerned, for me it has helped my aiming a lot by having an uninterrupted line of sight down the cue all the way to my aim point on the CB. My stroke seems like it is more effortless with the open bridge as well. My control using english has been better as well as my production of follow. The only thing that seems to have suffered is the draw stroke.

For some odd reason, if i switch back to the closed bridge, my draw stroke snaps right back into place. However, this is only on long draw shots. A medium range draw or less i can handle with the open bridge without a problem.

Anyways, i was just wondering what the current thoughts were on this. I know that it is helping my game and it seems like a few of the pros are switching over to the open bridge. Maybe there really is something to it.

UTAddb
07-21-2005, 06:44 PM
Matt- can't believe you became one of them. I'm a closed bridge man but find myself sometimes using an open bridge out of laziness. I draw the rock much better with a closed. I think closed maximizes control and precision because the shaft is not allowed to stray or veer off whatsoever. For example, when hitting a high follow shot with an open bridge, logically I would think that the tip/cue comes up off the ball prematurely because there is nothing to keep it from flying off. However, with a closed the stroke delivers straight through and is at maximum efficiency.

ryushen21
07-21-2005, 07:36 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote UTAddb:</font><hr>For example, when hitting a high follow shot with an open bridge, logically I would think that the tip/cue comes up off the ball prematurely because there is nothing to keep it from flying off.<hr /></blockquote>

Actually, because of the fact that i naturally cue the ball low, with a closed bridge shot, it brings my tip placement for a follow shot down and thus reduces the amount of spin. As i mentioned, on the firm draw stroke it seems like i inevitably end up using the closed bridge. I don't know why that is.

sneakypapi
07-21-2005, 08:56 PM
I typically use an open bridge because when I first started playing it made the game easier for me so I got used to it. I can use an open birdge if I wanted to but I feel my accuarcy goes down. I notice when I use an open birdge I can make micro adjustments as I am aiming and stroking, with a closed bridge I seem to be more locked in to aiming as I stroke and can't make the the micro adjustments as easily.

Many pros will switch back and forth from an open to a closed bridge, what carefully and you will notice it, not all but many as I watch them play.

For the draw stroke and long draw strokes, I would suggest keeping the closed bridge. There is no reason why you can't switch bridges depending on the shot.

Bob_Jewett
07-21-2005, 09:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote UTAddb:</font><hr> ... For example, when hitting a high follow shot with an open bridge, logically I would think that the tip/cue comes up off the ball prematurely because there is nothing to keep it from flying off. ... <hr /></blockquote>
That assumes the tip is on the ball for a long time and that your hand can have a significant effect on the shaft during that time. Neither of those is true.

Jal
07-21-2005, 10:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ryushen21:</font><hr> ....
For some odd reason, if i switch back to the closed bridge, my draw stroke snaps right back into place. However, this is only on long draw shots. A medium range draw or less i can handle with the open bridge without a problem.
... <hr /></blockquote>

I had much the same experience you had when I switched from closed to open. All of the things you mentioned improved, immediately. However, I do go back to the closed bridge now and then because it feels like it provides some stroke stability. Whether this is actually true or not is another matter.

With regard to your long draw stroke, you may be doing what I do on occasion: gripping the cue too firmly and lifting it partially off your open bridge. It's devilishly hard to tell when it's happening, other then by observing the result.

Jim

Nightstalker
07-22-2005, 04:16 AM
I use a closed bridge unless the shot is from the rail or I have to stretch.

Fred Agnir
07-22-2005, 06:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ryushen21:</font><hr> About two weeks ago i switched to using an open bridge. As far as the line of sight issue is concerned, for me it has helped my aiming a lot by having an uninterrupted line of sight down the cue all the way to my aim point on the CB. My stroke seems like it is more effortless with the open bridge as well. My control using english has been better as well as my production of follow. The only thing that seems to have suffered is the draw stroke.

For some odd reason, if i switch back to the closed bridge, my draw stroke snaps right back into place. However, this is only on long draw shots. A medium range draw or less i can handle with the open bridge without a problem.<hr /></blockquote> Is there a reason why you wouldn't use both?



[ QUOTE ]
I know that it is helping my game and it seems like a few of the pros are switching over to the open bridge. Maybe there really is something to it. <hr /></blockquote> I think this may be part of the confusion. There is no "few of the pros are switching over." Every decent pro uses both. It is not out of laziness that people use open bridges.

Here is my standard reply to this subject:


I'll echo what others have written before. In the beginning phases, a
student might change from an open bridge to a closed bridge in pool to
aid in their progress in straight stroking. But once they get better
and figure how to stroke relatively straight, then many players will
revert back to or at least re-incorporate the open bridge. Not only
is the open bridge important in a game of pool, it often is the
correct bridge for certain shots. That is to say, in many
circumstances, the use of a proper open bridge is actually an
indicator of advancement in pool.

Fred

Billy_Bob
07-22-2005, 07:51 AM
Well I'll say 3 things...

1. I have tried both open and closed bridges on various shots. I now use an open bridge for some shots and a closed bridge for other shots.

2. Learn to use both and use what works best for the particular shot.

3. Sometimes when the cue ball is near or frozen to the cushion, it becomes a contest as to how exactly you can place your fingers and shoot the shot. Sometimes I would maybe prefer a closed bridge, but it is not possible/comfortable. I just use what works best in the situation.

Cane
07-22-2005, 09:29 AM
I generally use an open bridge for shots where I'm hitting the cue ball above center and a closed bridge for shots where I'm hitting below center. I used to use an closed bridge 90% of the time, but I find both bridges have applications that make them "easier" to use on particular shots.

Later,
Bob

bluey2king
07-22-2005, 09:50 AM
I switch from a closed to open about a year ago. What I really like about it is my skin doesn't stick or grab or drag with a open bridge. I don't like using powder its such a mess. I did use a glove for awhile but I much prefer the open bridge. I agree you can't use it all the time, like along the rail or some pocket bridging shots.

Cane
07-22-2005, 10:38 AM
Geez, got me thinking again. I was downstairs doing my Mother Drills and did a count. I use 7 different bridges! Normal Open Bridge, Tripod Open, Magic draw bridge Closed (Those with fat fingers or arthritis will understand this one), normal closed bridge, open rail bridge, closed rail brige, extended rail brdige (open). Didn't realize I used so many variations of open and closed bridges.

Later,
Bob

BigRigTom
07-22-2005, 11:59 AM
Bob I think you hit the nail on the head. I use a lot of different bridges too and I really like the open bridges but they are just not enough by them selves. I know one player who almost never uses a closed bridge and another who almost never uses an open bridge.
The trick is to use the one that works for you...if you're having a problem and suppect it is a result of the type of bridge you're using just experiment with the other types. Learn them all and use the one that is most comfortable while giving you a firm controlled feeling.

ryushen21
07-22-2005, 12:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> Is there a reason why you wouldn't use both?<hr /></blockquote>

Fred,

In all actuality i am using both. It seems that there are actually three major bridges thta i am using. A rail bridge with the index finger over the cue and using the middle finger for stability - mainly used on my break and various rail shots. An open bridge for practically every shot on the table. And the closed the closed bridge for the long draw.

So to answer your question, there isn't any reason that i couldn't use both. In fact, i am. However, i used to be backwards in the closed vs. open debate. On any shot on the table i would use a closed bridge with the exception of a follow or force follow shot. but now i seem to have reversed. I guess i was more looking for input on what people have experienced with both and what they have found to be more effective for themselves personally. That and other little pieces of good advice.

Stretch
07-22-2005, 02:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ryushen21:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> Is there a reason why you wouldn't use both?<hr /></blockquote>

Fred,

In all actuality i am using both. It seems that there are actually three major bridges thta i am using. A rail bridge with the index finger over the cue and using the middle finger for stability - mainly used on my break and various rail shots. An open bridge for practically every shot on the table. And the closed the closed bridge for the long draw.

So to answer your question, there isn't any reason that i couldn't use both. In fact, i am. However, i used to be backwards in the closed vs. open debate. On any shot on the table i would use a closed bridge with the exception of a follow or force follow shot. but now i seem to have reversed. I guess i was more looking for input on what people have experienced with both and what they have found to be more effective for themselves personally. That and other little pieces of good advice. <hr /></blockquote>

My experience with bridges seems to be the reverse trend here. Liveing in Canada (for my generation anyway) Snooker was the game. So i learned an open bridge. Later when i got into the Billiard games i had to "learn" how to make a closed bridge. It was awkward and painful lol getting my fingers locked around the shaft and splaying the rest out for support. But it's worth it to add that extra security since Pool balls are much larger and heavyer than snooker balls. Also you can do more with a Pool ball in terms of shot requirements. In Pool you can be more imaginative and creative with shot selection and shot variety. The more bridges you can use comfortably the better. There are a host of bridges from masse on down, and lets not forget the mechanical bridges! They are there, know how to use them too! St.

ceebee
07-22-2005, 03:14 PM
Caneman, you are doing it right. There are so many different types of shots in every kind of game that it can make a beginner quit the game.

Here's what to do. Next time you are playing a MATCH GAME &amp; your opponent misses a shot really BAD, tell them they used the WRONG Bridge. Be patient &amp; see if they ask you what Bridge they should have used.

I believe that some of the Bridges &amp; Strokes, which players choose to employ, are self-imposed for comfort of play &amp; confidence in shot making.

theinel
07-22-2005, 05:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ryushen21:</font><hr>For some odd reason, if i switch back to the closed bridge, my draw stroke snaps right back into place. However, this is only on long draw shots. A medium range draw or less i can handle with the open bridge without a problem.
<hr /></blockquote>
I have similar results with the open bridge and long draw shots and generally switch to closed bridge for them. The only small piece of advice I have if you really want to shoot long draw with the open bridge is to elevate slightly and use some downward pressure on the cue.

JimS
07-23-2005, 06:54 PM
All three of the pros from whom I've taken lessons have given me that same simple instructions regarding the open/closed birdge.

The closed bridge is more stable so use it when shooting hard otherwise the open bridge provides more room to see your shot so use the open bridge unless you are shooting hard or unless the shooting positon will not lend itself to an open bridge.

Just use common sense and your own judgement and don't worry about which is right/wrong.

Cane
07-24-2005, 06:44 AM
JimS is right. The "right" bridge is the one you're more comfortable with on a given shot. Personally, I'm more comfortable on any draw shot with a closed bridge and any follow shot with an open bridge. I know some great players, however that use an open bridge on most all shots... also know some great players that use a closed bridge on almost all shots.

Later,
Bob

HALHOULE
01-09-2006, 09:13 PM
Never had a tip come off the ball. Why should it?

Deeman3
01-10-2006, 02:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote HALHOULE:</font><hr> Never had a tip come off the ball. Why should it? <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> When the cue ball departs after a shot, it would be difficult and embarrassing to have the tip stay with the object ball, puls it would make the cue ball hop on the way to the object ball. It is normal for a tip to not stay in contact with the cue ball after the shot.

Deeman </font color>

Chopstick
01-10-2006, 06:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman3:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote HALHOULE:</font><hr> Never had a tip come off the ball. Why should it? <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> When the cue ball departs after a shot, it would be difficult and embarrassing to have the tip stay with the object ball, puls it would make the cue ball hop on the way to the object ball.

It is normal for a tip to not stay in contact with the cue ball after the shot.

Deeman </font color> <hr /></blockquote>


/ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif If you hadn't said it, I would have. Morning Deeman.

Chopstick
01-10-2006, 06:56 AM
Here's a simple shot you can try. The cue ball is a couple inches away from the rail. It is in a position where you can use an open or a closed rail bridge. I have found that it is much more difficult to sight this cut into the corner with a closed rail bridge.

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