PDA

View Full Version : draw practice



Drop1
07-27-2005, 08:15 PM
About two weeks ago,I set up two golf tees on the table,and started trying to draw the cue ball straight back through the tees. I started at about six inches from the object ball,and got consistant. Now I can draw about 14 inches back through the tees. The next thing I'm going to do is to start controlling the draw hitting the object ball at different angles,to bring the cue ball down the table,through the tees. This also has really helped my stroke to smooth out.

Bob_Jewett
07-27-2005, 09:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> About two weeks ago,I set up two golf tees on the table,... <hr /></blockquote>
Here's a draw drill that doesn't require golf tees:

Put the nine ball on the short rail a diamond from a corner pocket. Put the one ball near that corner pocket (maybe a ball out). Make the one and draw the cue ball to the nine, knocking it towards the other corner pocket along that short rail. Leave the nine where you knock it. Put another object ball near the pocket and shoot it in and draw the cue ball to nudge the nine further along the rail. See how many shots it takes you to make the nine in the other corner pocket.

You can set up for a straight-back draw to the nine, but you may discover that it is easier to do the shot with an angle. It's OK to hit the short rail before the nine, but not the long rail.

Billy_Bob
07-28-2005, 09:30 AM
You can also shoot a ball into a pocket and draw the cue ball back into the pocket behind your shot. Basically the cue ball and object ball would be in a straight line between the two pockets. So diagonal corner pockets or two side pockets. This is good practice to learn how *not* to scratch when drawing the cue ball. (If you practice deliberately doing something, you learn how not to do it.)

Also practice drawing back the cue ball specific distances. Draw back 1/2 diamond, 1 diamond, 2 diamonds, 1/2 table length, 1 table length, etc. This is very hard due to variations in this and that. It helps to always use the same weight cue, same brand/hardness/shape tip, same exact tip condition, and same amount of chalk applied before each shot. I always apply chalk before each draw shot, especiallly around the sides of the tip. Then I look at the tip under the light to be sure there are no slick spots.

Then there are varing cue balls (new, old, clean, dirty) and speed of table cloth. For this, I practice drawing back different distances before each tournament on the table I will be using.

And then there are long, medium, and short distances between the cue ball and object ball. This messes up everything! Drawing back the cue ball 1 diamond when the cue ball is close to the object ball is one thing, but when there is a longer distance between balls, everything changes.

theinel
07-31-2005, 01:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>This is good practice to learn how *not* to scratch when drawing the cue ball. (If you practice deliberately doing something, you learn how not to do it.)<hr /></blockquote>
Billy_Bob, I try to get people to do this all of the time but it doesn't translate to pool very well. It works great when explaining it to golfers. If you sit on the range and try to slice balls you learn how to slice/fade very quickly. If you try to hook/draw balls you learn that too although for most people it takes a little longer. Once someone learns how to do both excessive hooks and slices the straight or near straight shots (i.e. controlled fade/draw) are produced much more naturally.

The parallels in pool are, unfortunately, not as easy to generate.

Billy_Bob
07-31-2005, 09:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote theinel:</font><hr> ...If you sit on the range and try to slice balls you learn how to slice/fade very quickly. If you try to hook/draw balls you learn that too although for most people it takes a little longer. Once someone learns how to do both excessive hooks and slices the straight or near straight shots (i.e. controlled fade/draw) are produced much more naturally...<hr /></blockquote>

Well I don't know if I would want to go chasing sliced golf balls or not? /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif But then maybe doing this a few times would teach me to hit nowhere near bushes, trees, etc?

Thunderduck
08-02-2005, 04:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> You can also shoot a ball into a pocket and draw the cue ball back into the pocket behind your shot. Basically the cue ball and object ball would be in a straight line between the two pockets. So diagonal corner pockets or two side pockets. This is good practice to learn how *not* to scratch when drawing the cue ball. (If you practice deliberately doing something, you learn how not to do it.)

<hr /></blockquote>

This is the same drill Ive been working on for the past 6 months... I always mistakenly draw the ball too far left every time,... when I try and compensate to the right I hit a stop shot by mistake... its very odd...

Billy_Bob
08-03-2005, 09:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Thunderduck:</font><hr>This is the same drill Ive been working on for the past 6 months... I always mistakenly draw the ball too far left every time,... when I try and compensate to the right I hit a stop shot by mistake... its very odd... <hr /></blockquote>

OK, you need to line up the cue ball, object ball, and two pockets so they are all in a *perfectly* straight line. Then hit the object ball with the cue ball exactly dead center.

And hitting the object ball silightly to the left/right side will not cut it. Needs to be exactly dead center.

To get to where you can "see" very slight variations in the allignment of the two balls *and* be able to hit the object ball exactly dead center with the cue ball...

Clear the table. Then place an object ball on the foot spot. Then place the cue ball 1 diamond back closer to the center diamond on the short rail...

Wei
http://endeavor.med.nyu.edu/~wei/pool/

START(
%AN9O5%PH8O5%Wr6O6%XO6O5

)END

...then time and time again, shoot the cue ball into the 1 ball as shown so the 1 ball hits the far center diamond, then returns to hit the cue ball. This is very hard to do. You have to have the two balls perfectly lined up, hit the cue ball dead center, and make the cue ball hit the 1 ball exactly dead center.

Practice doing this a lot, then your "vision" will become very exacting so far as noticing very slight variations in the allignment of the two balls. You will find yourself moving the object ball 1 millimeter left/right so it is just right.

Then after practicing this a lot, line up two balls as shown between the center pockets...

START(
%A[2R5%P[3V6%W[2D4%X[2Q7%Y[4Z5%Z[2S3%eB4b2

)END

Then hit the object ball dead center *slowly* with draw, follow through 6 inches past cue ball, and you will easily be able to draw the cue ball back into the side pocket (more often than not).

theinel
08-05-2005, 12:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr>Put the nine ball on the short rail a diamond from a corner pocket. Put the one ball near that corner pocket (maybe a ball out). Make the one and draw the cue ball to the nine, knocking it towards the other corner pocket along that short rail. Leave the nine where you knock it. Put another object ball near the pocket and shoot it in and draw the cue ball to nudge the nine further along the rail. See how many shots it takes you to make the nine in the other corner pocket.<hr /></blockquote>
Bob, do you recommend this drill with ball in hand on each shot or with a preset starting position? I realize you could do it many ways but was just curious as to how you do it. It could make a good progressive drill starting near the corner ball and gradually moving farther away as you improve.

Billy_Bob
08-06-2005, 07:33 AM
I forgot to say...

I can better "see"... If the cue ball and object ball are say 1 diamond apart and at one end of the table and you are shooting to the far end of the table... I walk back from the table say about 6 ft. and look at the alignment of the two balls. I can better tell from this distance the alignment of the two balls.