PDA

View Full Version : strickland at skins tournement



vinnie717
08-04-2005, 10:31 AM
You all probaly know about earl at the skins tournement with charlie williams and the foul.I dont see why everybody has got to get all worked up i agree that it wasnt very sportsmanlike but if u were playing for that kind of money would u say oh yea take ball in hand and knock me out of the money i dont want it?cmon anyone else thought of it like this?

vince

tannerpruess
08-04-2005, 02:06 PM
Everything isn't about money, I would have said it was a foul if the ref didn't see it and I was the shooter.

RailbirdJAM
08-04-2005, 02:09 PM
Funny you should bring that up, almost a year after the event at any rate, but I do know ESPN shows pool reruns as fillers! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I've heard quite a few debates from a variety of pool folk about Strickland not calling a foul on himself against Charlie Williams.

IMO, Scott Smith made a bad call and completely missed it, just like the referees/umpires do in other sports games. Scott is human, though, and instant replay costs too much for pocket billiards. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Interestingly, the pool player purists, if you can call them that, were all in agreement that they would have done EXACTLY the same thing as Earl; i.e., if the ref didn't call/see it, all is fair in [love and] war. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Those who were in agreement that Earl was "wrong" consisted of railbirds, spectators, pool fans, and the not-so-serious pool player, for lack of a better term. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Personally, I thought Earl Strickland's caliber of play outshined every single player at last year's World Summit of Pool, even though he didn't win the event. His ball patterns, intense focus, and STROKE were amazing to see on national TV. Say what you want about Earl and his antics, but I think he's incredible to watch on a field of green. JMHO, FWIW! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

RailbirdJAM

RailbirdJAM
08-04-2005, 02:21 PM
TannerPruess, great minds think alike! /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

There will always be a school of thought that Earl should have done the gentlemanly thing and given Charlie Williams ball in hand. I've thought long and hard as to what I would have done in that instance if it was me, but I'd be so nervous in the pit with 1,000 eyeballs staring at me, being filmed in national TV, that I'd probably run back to my seat and hope for the best. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

People do STRANGE things when they're in the heat of battle. I've witnessed players moving beads for game scores unknowingly in a daze, and I've also seen them forget to do it. One-pocket players sometimes forget to gather their pocketed balls, and at other times, they'll take their opponent's. I think Earl followed his instincts and abided by the referee's call. That's what players are instructed before every high-profile event on TV, never to question the call of the ref, no questions asked.

RailbirdJAM

Leviathan
08-05-2005, 07:54 AM
Hi, JAM:

You write that "Interestingly, the pool player purists, if you can call them that, were all in agreement that they would have done EXACTLY the same thing as Earl; i.e., if the ref didn't call/see it, all is fair in love and war."

I don't think you've chosen your words with your usual care here; I really can't call people who have an "anything's fair in love and war" attitude about sportsmanship "purists." What's pure about their attitude?

It seems to me that sportsmanship is a basic element of any game, and that good players who fall short in the sportsmanship department don't play the whole game. One does see professionals call "invisible" fouls on themselves in refereed matches. I've seen Ewa Laurance do this, for example, and I respect her for her sportsmanship. I might call her a purist, but I don't think anyone who has an "anything's fair in love and war" attitude about sportsmanship deserves that particular appellation.

Alan Salmon

RailbirdJAM
08-05-2005, 11:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> Hi, JAM:

You write that "Interestingly, the pool player purists, if you can call them that, were all in agreement that they would have done EXACTLY the same thing as Earl; i.e., if the ref didn't call/see it, all is fair in love and war."

I don't think you've chosen your words with your usual care here; I really can't call people who have an "anything's fair in love and war" attitude about sportsmanship "purists." What's pure about their attitude?<hr /></blockquote>
Hi, Leviathan. At the time of writing my post, I could not think of a correct term to capture my thoughts. In a nutshell, it may boil down to semantics, as is customary on Internet forums with the printed word. The responders to the oral debate I witnessed who would have done exactly as Earl Strickland were pool players in the strictest sense of the word. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Levithan:</font><hr>It seems to me that sportsmanship is a basic element of any game, and that good players who fall short in the sportsmanship department don't play the whole game. One does see professionals call "invisible" fouls on themselves in refereed matches. I've seen Ewa Laurance do this, for example, and I respect her for her sportsmanship. I might call her a purist, but I don't think anyone who has an "anything's fair in love and war" attitude about sportsmanship deserves that particular appellation.<hr /></blockquote>

I really admire Ewa Mataya, and aside from us sharing the same birthday, she is truly an asset to the game/sport in so many different ways, not only as a competitor.

Recently, at a WPBA event in Florida, she was defeated by 18-year-old Pamela Treadway, and an eyewitness to the match stated that after the conclusion of the match, Ewa threw her cue stick in the air like a dart. I'm sure it was an elegant throw, and she looked good doing so! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

I do surmise if it had been Earl Strickland who had thrown his stick in the air like a dart, there would have been quite a different reaction. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

I believe when players are in the heat of battle, they do funny things, though not always "politically correct." /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

RailbirdJAM

Stretch
08-05-2005, 12:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RailbirdJAM:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> Hi, JAM:

You write that "Interestingly, the pool player purists, if you can call them that, were all in agreement that they would have done EXACTLY the same thing as Earl; i.e., if the ref didn't call/see it, all is fair in love and war."

I don't think you've chosen your words with your usual care here; I really can't call people who have an "anything's fair in love and war" attitude about sportsmanship "purists." What's pure about their attitude?<hr /></blockquote>
Hi, Leviathan. At the time of writing my post, I could not think of a correct term to capture my thoughts. In a nutshell, it may boil down to semantics, as is customary on Internet forums with the printed word. The responders to the oral debate I witnessed who would have done exactly as Earl Strickland were pool players in the strictest sense of the word. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Levithan:</font><hr>It seems to me that sportsmanship is a basic element of any game, and that good players who fall short in the sportsmanship department don't play the whole game. One does see professionals call "invisible" fouls on themselves in refereed matches. I've seen Ewa Laurance do this, for example, and I respect her for her sportsmanship. I might call her a purist, but I don't think anyone who has an "anything's fair in love and war" attitude about sportsmanship deserves that particular appellation.<hr /></blockquote>

I really admire Ewa Mataya, and aside from us sharing the same birthday, she is truly an asset to the game/sport in so many different ways, not only as a competitor.

Recently, at a WPBA event in Florida, she was defeated by 18-year-old Pamela Treadway, and an eyewitness to the match stated that after the conclusion of the match, Ewa threw her cue stick in the air like a dart. I'm sure it was an elegant throw, and she looked good doing so! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

I do surmise if it had been Earl Strickland who had thrown his stick in the air like a dart, there would have been quite a different reaction. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

I believe when players are in the heat of battle, they do funny things, though not always "politically correct." /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

RailbirdJAM [/quote

Hey JAM. I think everyone has 'lost it' or gone instant stupid by times. I know i have. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif That's Pool for ya. Idealy, given the same situation, you would hope that you'd do the right thing. The RIGHT thing for me is calling everything. If i know i 'got away with one' and say nothing, the pool gods made me pay. If i called myself (dosn't matter where or when) i always got it back, and even played better. In team Sport, or league interestingly the RIGHT thing to do is play dumb and take one for the team (or you will here about it lol ) St.

Floyd
08-06-2005, 08:56 PM
I think of pool as I think of golf. If you commit a foul, and no one is aware of it call it on yourself.

Fred Floyd