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View Full Version : Draw shots - long distance between CB and OB



Billy_Bob
08-06-2005, 10:38 AM
We were discussing this on another thread....

Dr. Dave observed in his latest tests that collision-induced throw is greater for stun shots.

I was thinking that this was maybe why I frequently had trouble pocketing balls when it was a draw shot with a long distance between the CB and OB.

Then Cane said that not hitting the cue ball dead center with a long draw shot can introduce curve/swerve (masse') and squirt...

So to see what was going on... I shot the cue ball 5 times at the far center diamond with draw (Like drill where you shoot the cue ball and get it to come straight back)... And I'll be darned! The cue ball only came straight back 2 out of 5 times. And one time it was 1 inch off the mark by the time it hit the far rail!

If I take more time with these shots, I can get the cue ball to come straight back more consistently. So I think I need to pay a lot of attention to hitting the cue ball dead center with long draw shots, then work on the throw problems.

Perhaps this is why some pros prefer to go "forward" rather than "backward" with the cue ball?

vinnie717
08-06-2005, 04:45 PM
i have a weird thing on long draws too.say the cb is 1 foot from the end rail and the ob a diamond past the side pocket.if i concentrate on the cb i can het it back down the end rail 90% of the time and make the shot 50% and opposite when i focus on the ob weird huh?
vince

nhp
08-06-2005, 05:48 PM
On long drawshots I don't think swerve plays a part. The cueball is sliding all the way to the object ball so it is travelling straight. Hitting the cb off center and not aligning to the shot properly are the reason why you have trouble drawing back straight. On draw shots with sidespin, after you make contact with the object ball, the path the cueball takes can be altered quite a bit. On cutshots with slight angles fool around with low inside and outside english, you will see what I am talking about. There are positional shots that can be done that many players have no idea about. I am talking about the path the cueball takes right after striking the object ball, not after it hits the OB and then the rail and the english takes effect. You can minimize angles and create big angles with this. You can even draw straight back on slight angle cut shots.

Jay M
08-07-2005, 05:31 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Perhaps this is why some pros prefer to go "forward" rather than "backward" with the cue ball?<hr /></blockquote>

I think you'll find that most, if not all pros prefer to go forward rather than back. The reason is that draw is the most difficult english to control. Not because of any "swerve" that is imparted to the cue, but because the speed control can be radically different between two tables, even if the equipment and carpet are exactly the same. Follow is MUCH more forgiving of deviations in shot strength and spin.

Rule of thumb... if you don't HAVE to draw it, don't.

This doesn't mean not to practice the shot, just remember that drawing the cue is the last resort, right before you start trying to throw the cue off the object ball.

Jay M

SpiderMan
08-08-2005, 07:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> Perhaps this is why some pros prefer to go "forward" rather than "backward" with the cue ball?
<hr /></blockquote>

It's because follow can be controlled more precisely, by almost any player.

Set up a straight-in shot with the CB about 2 feet from the OB. Mark a spot one foot before the OB and try to draw back onto that spot. Now set it up again and mark a spot one foot beyond the contact and try to follow onto that spot.

If you're like most, you'll be able to predict the forward-roll distance much more accurately.

SpiderMan

Stretch
08-08-2005, 11:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> Perhaps this is why some pros prefer to go "forward" rather than "backward" with the cue ball?
<hr /></blockquote>



It's because follow can be controlled more precisely, by almost any player.

Set up a straight-in shot with the CB about 2 feet from the OB. Mark a spot one foot before the OB and try to draw back onto that spot. Now set it up again and mark a spot one foot beyond the contact and try to follow onto that spot.

If you're like most, you'll be able to predict the forward-roll distance much more accurately.

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

That's right SMan. That's precicely why i always set up my ball in hands to follow to my next shot, or breakout. If your playing good patterns u only need to use stop shots or follow shots anyway. But that's not to say drawing is not important. In lots of cases it the best option, or only option so it has to be an intrigal part of your cue ball control. Drawing is all about touch and feel, more so imo than a follow stroke. St.