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View Full Version : Stroketrainer - What the latest opinions on it?



BigRigTom
08-09-2005, 08:36 AM
I bought a Stroketrainer (http://billiardsgamestroketrainer.com/) and just received it a little over a week ago. I took the leap after reading some of the testimonials which really cemented opinions I had read on the CCB a while back.
I was very skeptical about the price vs. value but now that I have worked on it for a little more than a week I am truly impressed. It works for me! Money well spent. My stroke and confidence in my stroke has NEVER been better.
Anyone else tried it lately?

stickman
08-09-2005, 09:04 AM
If you use it, it will work. I've had mine for quite a long while. I get lazy and neglect to use it. When I get tired of missing, I remember to use it again. Price vs value? Easily worth the price in my opinion. Your post just reminded me, it's time for me to begin using it again regularly. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

stickman
08-09-2005, 12:01 PM
I see several posts dedicated to various aiming systems. Aiming has never been my problem. I use a simple point of contact approach and it suits me fine. My problem has always been that I don't always hit where I aim. The stroketrainer with regular use corrects that problem for me. It doesn't matter what aiming system you use, if you can't hit where you're aiming. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

BigRigTom
08-09-2005, 12:48 PM
I agree with that simple method too. I had tried to comprehend some of the more complex explanations I have been reading about the 1/2 ball, 1/4 ball, etc and it just seems like way over complication to me....of course I am not of the caliber of those talking about those fractional aiming methods.
When I was in the Army I qualified for "Sharpshooter" on the M-16 while several of my buddies made the grade of "Expert". We were all trained the same way by the same guys and for the same amount of time.
Point is that some people have a natural talent for things and can excell without a lot of effort while the rest of us have to work very hard to just be better than average. I am one of those who has to work hard at playing above average pool. Fortunately, I don't mind the work and I actually enjoy the challenge.
The Stroketrainer is helping me and I can see that...I guess I just like to hear that I'm not the only one that sees the benefits. I think the money was well spent but I didn't immediately arrive at that conclusion. It took me about 3 sessions which I did in just 2 days. I felt the difference and I then thoughT "WOW! This thing is working!" That was good enough for me and the rest is just a matter of putting in the time (which isn't much) and the benefit is there and the price vs. value is obvious...too me anyway.
Stickman you should <font color="red">STICK</font color> to using it! Punn intended. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

woody_968
08-09-2005, 04:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> I see several posts dedicated to various aiming systems. Aiming has never been my problem. I use a simple point of contact approach and it suits me fine. My problem has always been that I don't always hit where I aim. <hr /></blockquote>

This is the case for MOST players that have spent any time at all at the table. Everyone thinks their stroke is straight so when they miss they figure they must have aimes wrong. Aiming is the easy part, its proper delivery of the cue that gives us trouble /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif

catscradle
08-10-2005, 10:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> I bought a Stroketrainer (http://billiardsgamestroketrainer.com/) and just received it a little over a week ago. I took the leap after reading some of the testimonials which really cemented opinions I had read on the CCB a while back.
I was very skeptical about the price vs. value but now that I have worked on it for a little more than a week I am truly impressed. It works for me! Money well spent. My stroke and confidence in my stroke has NEVER been better.
Anyone else tried it lately? <hr /></blockquote>

I attribute a significant improvement in my stroke directly to the stroke trainer. However, I find that as I've aged (59) I've developed a certain amount of discomfort and ache in my elbow and the use of the stroke trainer seems to exacerbate the problem for me. Other than that caveat, the stroke trainer is great. I found especially useful the development of my offhand (left in my case).

BigRigTom
08-10-2005, 10:51 AM
I too am getting on up there in age (54 now) and I did notice if I do the 100 reps times 3 to a set that I start feeling the strain in my shoulder, back and a little in the elbow. 50 reps was a breeze though and 100 was not that big of a deal so for now I am staying with the 100.
Definite improvement taking place....for me....not with out difficulty though!
I think that my stroke is improving the trueness of the hit of the cue ball on the object ball to the point that I am now struggling with controlling the speed for the position of the cue ball.....not a lot but there is a difference...enough that I notice it anyways!

Example:8 Ball League night was this past Monday, I am a Skill Level 6 and I played a Skill Level 4 which gave me a 5 to 3 match on a bar box that is hard to read the speed on to begin with. I lose the 1st 2 games while I'm stuggling with adapting to the table speed. Finally get the feel of it and proceed to win 5 in a row to take the match.....MAN that felt good too!

Stretch
08-10-2005, 10:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote catscradle:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote BigRigTom:</font><hr> I bought a Stroketrainer (http://billiardsgamestroketrainer.com/) and just received it a little over a week ago. I took the leap after reading some of the testimonials which really cemented opinions I had read on the CCB a while back.
I was very skeptical about the price vs. value but now that I have worked on it for a little more than a week I am truly impressed. It works for me! Money well spent. My stroke and confidence in my stroke has NEVER been better.
Anyone else tried it lately? <hr /></blockquote>

I attribute a significant improvement in my stroke directly to the stroke trainer. However, I find that as I've aged (59) I've developed a certain amount of discomfort and ache in my elbow and the use of the stroke trainer seems to exacerbate the problem for me. Other than that caveat, the stroke trainer is great. I found especially useful the development of my offhand (left in my case).

<hr /></blockquote>

You get out of it it what you put into it, simple as that. I admire anyone who works on improveing thier stroke. "thier" stroke. hmmmmmmm.

I'm just playing the Devils advocate on this one. But when i see the gazzillions of stroke training thingamabobbers that now pervade golf i can't help thinking of what lasting value the latest pool consumer product is. I agree that since they actually get you WORKING on whatever aspect of your game they are desined for, and that's good, But there has always been self descovered, cheaper, easier ways to acomplish the same thing. In this case how about stroking down the rail shots while observeing the results of straightness if you will over the rail. Or stroking into a bottle neck, or as #### once did, work on the kitchen table over the crack the table liefs make.

Personaly, i like my stroke and i'm constantly striveing to reolize it's full potential. In the end, i do not believe you can "buy" a better stroke. St.

bluey2king
08-10-2005, 11:22 AM
When you guys work with the Stroke Trainer, Do you stroke slow?
Address the pins with pre-strokes (like a shot) then stroke through it?
Stroke with a constant speed to a set number of reps?
Where do you focus your eyes? at what would be the cue ball or further out where the OB might be?
Thanks

Sid_Vicious
08-10-2005, 11:35 AM
Excellent questions, I am curious to see the answers also...sid

SPetty
08-10-2005, 12:05 PM
When you guys work with the Stroke Trainer, do you stroke slow?
<font color="blue">Compared to what? It's definitely not a fast stroke, but not like ultra-slow either. Just a controlled back and forth movement. </font color>

Address the pins with pre-strokes (like a shot) then stroke through it?
<font color="blue">No, just a controlled back and forth movement. </font color>

Stroke with a constant speed to a set number of reps?
<font color="blue">Yes, like that. </font color>

Where do you focus your eyes? at what would be the cue ball or further out where the OB might be?
<font color="blue">It really doesn't matter, I think. I've even closed my eyes to feel the stroke better. The device isn't to help you with your aim or pocketing abilities, so that's why I say it really doesn't matter what your eyes are doing. The device is solely for training your arm to reliably move along the same plane when you're stroking.

I really need to get mine out again, too. </font color>

BigRigTom
08-10-2005, 12:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluey2king:</font><hr> When you guys work with the Stroke Trainer, Do you stroke slow?
Address the pins with pre-strokes (like a shot) then stroke through it?
Stroke with a constant speed to a set number of reps?
Where do you focus your eyes? at what would be the cue ball or further out where the OB might be?
Thanks <hr /></blockquote>

I am fairly new to this thing but I basically do "ALL OF THE ABOVE".
I do agree with other comments that you get out directly proportionately to what you put in and you CAN NOT BUY A STROKE!
Of course you can't buy talent, a good attitude, good work ethic, good looks and a lot of other things either but that doesn't stop people from coming up with gizmos that make the effort more appealing or entertaining and sometimes that is just enough to push one in the right direction then who knows where one can reach or just how much one can achieve once momentum is established!

TommyT
08-10-2005, 07:58 PM
I've been doing 200 reps a day right handed and 50 reps with my left. I started Xmas morning. When you think you got it turn it around and stroke thru the pillars without the guide for your hand. I do this also 50 tomes a day right and left handed.
The stroketrainer is an awesome thing. Lets not tell many people. It's a big edge.
TommyT /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

woody_968
08-10-2005, 09:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>
<font color="blue"> The device isn't to help you with your aim or pocketing abilities, so that's why I say it really doesn't matter what your eyes are doing. The device is solely for training your arm to reliably move along the same plane when you're stroking.

</font color>
<hr /></blockquote>

The device is made to just work on your stroke, but I do think you may be able to help your sighting of the cue a little bit as well. When you are using the stroke trainer and your cue is in the forward position (tip on cloth through the guides) look at your tip and shift your head from left to right. Too far to the right and the right guide will block your view, too far to the left and the left guide blocks your view. When your head is in the proper position over the cue for your sighting you will see down the shaft with nothing getting in the way.

I havent spent much time with this, but I do think it could help some people find and refine their proper head position over the cue.

Oppinions?

stickman
08-10-2005, 09:18 PM
I tried stroking into a bottle neck, but it didn't improve my stroke. During a tournament between matches, I've stroked along side a rail for a quick tune-up. It's not as comfortable as the ST, and doesn't provide a tall enough guide to help me with my elbow. To me, the secret is in the guide. My biggest problem is with my elbow moving in or out from my body. The ST provides me a guide to train my elbow to stroke straight. It's hard for me to do 50-100 reps at one time. I'm tall and have arthritus in my knees. I do as many as I can and sit for a while, then do some more. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

TommyT
08-11-2005, 09:54 AM
If your an accomplished player it may take thousands of repititions in order to feel a difference. I can't explain why other than your stroke is usually pretty good at that level anyways. With your off hand you will be amazed at how quickly you will improve. I have been able to eliminate using the mechanical bridge for most occasions.
TommyT /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

bluey2king
08-11-2005, 10:30 AM
Thanks for the info.
One more..*S*
If you wanted to pratice a good draw stroke should you stroke through the pins down to the cloth? Or Just get your stroke straight then worry about how you apply it later when you are addressing a cue ball?

BigRigTom
08-11-2005, 11:10 AM
I have read a lot of different posts on the CCB about the draw shot.....and like other things there was good advise and some questionable stuff.
IMHO the draw stroke is all in the smoothness of the stroke as the tip goes thru the cue ball at a point below center. The actual result will depend on how far away the object ball is and how much combined speed and spin you achieve when your tip passes thru the cue ball position.
The ST (again IMHO) will improve your ability to perform that smooth stroke Thru the cue ball. If you like you can envision the cue ball sitting at the other side of the post and practice stroking thru it and I guaratee that after doing a few sets on the ST your draw shot will amaze you. <font color="red">Try it ...You'll like it!</font color>
Something referred to as "muscle memory" is developed and that also works regardless of the real or technical terms used to describe it. It's there and using the ST develops it to a point that when you drop into position to make a shot it just seems natural to do the stoke with out thinking about it...at least that is my experience with it so far. Keep in mind that I am only into week 2 with the ST and I am somewhat a fanatic about getting my money's worth out of something if there is anyway possible to do so.

Sid_Vicious
08-11-2005, 11:54 AM
I don't pose myself as all that accomplished but I did notice very quickly with the few strokes I've put through the guides on the ST that I didn't have much trouble, even while watching TV at the same time. Thousands of strokes...sounds like I'll be on Social Sec by the time I get through it all and see the difference, but it can't hurt to try. I somehow doubt that I will dedicate that kind of new practice time though, the Kinnister #1 shot and a camcorder would suffice better IMO...sid

catscradle
08-11-2005, 11:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluey2king:</font><hr> When you guys work with the Stroke Trainer, Do you stroke slow?
<hr /></blockquote>
I stroke with a moderately slow stroke. Incidentally, the developer of the stroke trainer recommends stroking in slow motion while using it.

[ QUOTE ]

Address the pins with pre-strokes (like a shot) then stroke through it?
<hr /></blockquote>
I try to use SPF omitting the warm-up strokes. Setting at the pins, pausing at the backstroke and following thru the pins on the finish.
[ QUOTE ]

Stroke with a constant speed to a set number of reps?
<hr /></blockquote>
Yes, generally.
[ QUOTE ]

Where do you focus your eyes? at what would be the cue ball or further out where the OB might be?
Thanks <hr /></blockquote>
Hadn't thought about it before, I guess on the vertical pins which would be the CB position.

JayCee
08-12-2005, 06:09 PM
Tom,

I recently borrowed my friends to try it out before making the purchase. I assembled it last night and gave it a try. I can honestly say that my triceps sure got a good burn.

My problem was trying to figure out which part of my stroking arm wrist was supposed to touch the metal as I stroke back and forth. I read on Doug's website that the wrist should be straight. When I keep my wrist straight vertically, it feels as if my thumb and knuckles rub against the plate. Is this normal? Will you shed insight on this? I'd like to ensure I'm doing it correctly.

Until next time,

Peace

stickman
08-12-2005, 07:59 PM
My thumb rubs against the guide. I actually hold the butt of my cue very lightly with my thumb and finger tips.

BigRigTom
08-12-2005, 11:27 PM
I also grip the cue lightly but with my thumb and middle finger. My index finger, ring finger, and pinky are just along for the ride.
My thumb nail is rubbing the Strokertrainer upright plate. Doug Carter recommends that you place a piece of paper between your hand and the plate of the stroke trainer..if the paper falls out it means you are not staying in line completely. For me that means that I have to consciously apply a slight pressure between my hand and the plate. It does not come natural but I can do it and it does seem to be getting easier as I continue to work at it. I have also tried using a small piece of table cloth and that works a bit better that the paper for me.