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SnakebyteXX
08-13-2005, 06:07 AM
Here in the San Francisco Bay Area prices are skyrocketing.

http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/6947/mngas100ckh4kw.jpg

S.F. drivers floored by cost of gas

38 cents above U.S. average -- state feels impact of oil prices

Tom Abate, Chronicle Staff Writer

Saturday, August 13, 2005

Frank Tognotti pulled into a gas station on San Francisco's Van Ness Avenue on Friday and was shocked that it cost nearly $30 to pump just 9 gallons of regular into the SUV he says he bought to help stimulate the economy after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

"That's the worst I've ever seen it," said the 38-year-old Emeryville man, who drives daily to the restaurant he opened two years ago in North Beach. "Why California? Why the Bay Area? Who says we have the deep pockets?" Tognotti asked rhetorically after shelling out $3.10 a gallon.

Americans coast to coast are digging deeper and paying more these days as factors ranging from a series of refinery shutdowns to international jitters have driven crude oil prices to new highs. Oil scheduled for September delivery closed at $66.86 a barrel Friday on the New York Mercantile Exchange, the highest close recorded since trading began there in 1983. A little over three weeks ago, the same barrel of crude cost $56.72.

The rapid run-up in crude has sent gas prices soaring, particularly in California, where the current average price per gallon for regular stood at $2. 72 Friday, according to the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report. The comparable national average was $2.41 per gallon.

If it's any comfort, San Francisco's average of $2.79 per gallon of regular was two-tenths of a cent lower than in Santa Barbara, which had the highest price per gallon Friday of the 25 metropolitan areas in California tracked by AAA.

San Francisco resident Diane Sinnott was stunned to shell out $28 to put just under 9 gallons of regular into her sports car at the same Van Ness station whose price had shocked Tognotti -- especially since there was another station a block away where gas was selling at the citywide average, a savings of about 30 cents per gallon.

"But I only fill up about once a month,'' said the 43-year-old Sinnott, who keeps the car garaged most of the time and walks to her Financial District job as an art consultant. "I'm sort of glad gas prices are this way. I hope it forces people to sell their gas guzzlers."

In the parking lot at the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge, JoAnn and Vance Dreher, 39, sat with their two children and JoAnn's mom in a rented minivan, escaping the fog and chill. They had been flabbergasted when they paid $2.70 a gallon to fill up earlier that day -- a bargain for the Bay Area, but a shock, given that regular had been running about $2.25 a gallon when they left their Cleveland suburb a week ago to fly here for a summer vacation.

"I think they're trying to make a world price,'' said Vance Dreher, without naming any names behind this pricing plot.

A nearby busload of tourists from the Israeli city of Haifa said the Golden Gate was great but that California prices were nothing to crow about. "It's three times as much at home," said Israeli tour leader Giora Bernat.

But for truck driver Jerry Hawkins, 59, the recent run-up in diesel fuel -- which was $2.32 a gallon when he left Toledo about a week ago and now is running upwards of $2.80 -- has added $80 to $100 to the cost of filling up his thirsty 18-wheeler. And since the truck is his own, and he runs it on a flat contract fee, each tankful comes out of his pocket.

"I've been at this 31 years, and this is the worst it's been," said Hawkins, who was loading up on the south side of San Francisco before setting off on a long haul to New York. "I won't be able to afford this very much longer."

At the U-Haul Center on Bayshore Boulevard, San Lorenzo residents Larry and Lupe Foster, were waiting for the truck that the couple planned to drive up to Portland, where they are moving to be near family.

Larry Foster, who recently retired from a career as a wind power engineer, said he really isn't that bothered by the current price spikes, but he said he is aggravated with the environmental and political opposition that has prevented drilling off the California coast and in the Arctic.

"To me, it's common sense," he said, to increase domestic supply and cut down on oil imports.

Lupe Foster listened and smiled and gently shook her head. On election days, she gets up early, she told a reporter, to make sure she can get to the polls and cancel out Larry's vote.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CHART:
Pumped up

$2.41 National average

$2.72 California average

$2.79 Highest average in California *

$2.65 Lowest average in California**

$2.79 San Francisco average

$2.72 San Jose average

$2.73 Oakland average

*Santa Barbara, which is slightly higher than S.F.

**Sacramento

Source: AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report

web page (http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/08/13/MNGMHE7IMR1.DTL)

dad8
08-13-2005, 08:49 AM
20 Miles north of Atlanta $2.49

eg8r
08-13-2005, 02:25 PM
We just paid $2.39/gallon. This is the first time we have paid over $30 for a tank of gas. /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

eg8r <~~~still happy we don't have Europes gas prices

SnakebyteXX
08-13-2005, 02:35 PM
Houston: avg. $2.32

Drivers paying out the hose

With an 11-cent jump at the pump this week alone, drivers are finding new ways to cope

By JOHN C. ROPER and BILL HENSEL JR.
Copyright 2005 Houston Chronicle

Fidelis Uzoka, a Houston cabbie for 16 years, is among those feeling the pinch of record gasoline prices.

"It has a ripple effect, you don't take enough money home and your family ends up suffering," said Uzoka, who drives a Jeep Cherokee for Square Deal Cab, which he says costs him at least $32 a day in gasoline to operate, up from the low $20s a year ago.

His solution: more time on the road.

"I work several more hours a day now," said Uzoka, who clocks in at around 6 a.m. and usually heads home after midnight. "A year ago, I started at 8 o'clock and finished by 6 p.m."

The average price of regular unleaded in Houston hit a record $2.32 a gallon Thursday, AAA said Friday in its weekly Weekend Gas Watch.

That marked an increase of 11 cents from last week's average and 55 cents higher than a year ago, according to AAA, which has been monitoring gas prices since the mid-1980s.

"We're surprised that prices are moving so rapidly," said Rose Rougeau, AAA spokeswoman in Houston. "Last year oil was $44 a barrel and prices at the pump were $1.77 and at that time that was a record."

AAA places the blame for the higher prices both on supply and demand — summer is the peak period for gasoline use — and the price of oil.

Don't look for the rise to end soon. In fact, the average price of regular unleaded in Houston rose an additional 2 cents since Thursday, Rougeau said.

Signaling what's ahead, the benchmark price of crude oil closed up $1.06 at $66.86 a barrel Friday.

At houstongasprices.com, a Web site where consumers report local gas prices, there were postings Friday for three filling stations selling regular gasoline for $2.19 a gallon and one with the price at the pump that reached $2.59.

A Shell station at the corner of Chimney Rock and Richmond on Friday afternoon was selling regular unleaded for $2.99.

The average price for regular gas nationally was $2.40, AAA said in its report.

That's short of the nation's inflation-adjusted high. The record for average regular gasoline prices is March 1981 at $3.08 per gallon when adjusted for today's dollars.

But consumers are finding today's prices troubling.

An Associated Press-AOL News poll on public attitudes about gasoline prices released Friday found that 64 percent of Americans believe the prices will cause them financial hardship in the next six months.

In Houston, prices are spurring some to make changes.


Spending $80 a day
For Guadalupe Vasquez, who's been driving a wrecker for 27 years, the higher gas prices are spurring him to work more hours.


"It's not funny anymore," said Vasquez, who recalled he used to spend $30 a day for his wrecker truck and said he now spends about $80. "You can't even make any money."

Derrick Major, 34, of Sugar Land said he and his family have postponed plans for a trip to San Antonio this weekend because of climbing gas prices.

"It's just out of the question," the salesman for Sir Speedy printers said as he filled up at a Diamond Shamrock on South Main Street in the shadow of Reliant Stadium.

His 2005 Ford Expedition costs about $70 to fill up, while the 1999 Honda Accord his wife drives — she has the longer commute — costs about $30 to fill.

"We used to budget about $75 per week for gasoline, but we've had to double it," the father of four said.

What will it take for the Majors to reschedule the San Antonio trip?

"When I see it back down at $2.10 or so," he said. "I'm not holding my breath."

At a Shamrock service station in Sugar Land, Nimo Lawal was filling her car and said prices have gotten so high she has severely curtailed her driving.

"Now I try and do five things on each trip I take," said Lawal, who goes to school in Medical Center area and works near the Galleria. She puts at least 150 miles a week on her car.

"You have to go to work, so what can you do about it," she said. "I won't be taking any more leisure trips."

Michelle Hammonds, an administrative assistant, said Friday she is considering taking the bus or carpooling and that she might try to change her hours so she can come in earlier to take advantage of carpooling.

J.D. Power and Associates believes gas prices will have to climb substantially higher before motorists significantly alter car-buying habits.


Want to buy a gas hog?
Local car dealerships, however, are starting to see some slight changes.


"Many people, if they are considering a new or used vehicle, are thinking about more economical vehicles than they did two or three years ago." said Joe Herman, senior vice president of operations for Group 1 Automotive in Houston.

Bob Clark, the location general manager for CarMax Auto Superstore on Southwest Freeway, agrees.

"If they were looking for a Suburban or an Excursion they may have dropped down to a minivan," Clark said.

Houstonians, though, can be thankful they don't live in Wailuku, Hawaii, where the average cost of regular gas, according to AAA, was $2.91, the highest in the nation.

Chronicle reporters Eric Hason, Tom Fowler and David Ivanovich contributed.

john.roper@chron.com bill.hensel@chron.com


web page (http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/topstory/3308794)

DickLeonard
08-13-2005, 02:48 PM
Americans are the dumbest people. Since the 1960s we have elected three Presidents from Texas and we have gone through the same sceniaro. War increases the price of Oil and Texas has the Oil. They also have the Army Bases, the Air Force Bases etc. All the Tax Money flows to Texas of Course Texans beleve in low Taxes as long as they sucking up everyone elses tax dollars.

Now the Space Program is sucking up the Tax Dollar, In Houston and Florida. That is one program that should be scrapped before we Kill more people with their ineptness.
####

dg-in-centralpa
08-13-2005, 05:52 PM
Lebanon,Pa - 15 miles east of Hershey/90 miles west of Philly, anywhere from 2.30 to 2.48 per gallon. Too expensive.

DG

onepocketfanatic
08-13-2005, 06:13 PM
I find it amusing (I really did chuckle) that you would group all of us Texans into one group Dick. I am just an average working guy, and don't own any oil wells, nor does the company that I work for have anything to do with oil. Neither do I own a cowboy hat, boots, cowboy belt, have cows, go to rodeos, or any of the other stereotypical crap that most people think about people from Texas. I was born in Texas and have been here all of my life by the way.
I think it has a lot less to do with where a president comes from than the fact that our government is run by big money being shoved into the pockets of local, state, and federal government officials. These folks do what is good for their own well being (getting reelected and rich) rather than what is good for the country (they have enough nerve to say "oh the fact that so and so gave me $100,000 has no bearing on my decision to vote for or against something that would affect this contributor". Yea right and I just fell off the turnip truck yesterday too.
Oh and by the way here in Houston it is running about $2.50 the last time I filled up (which was about a week ago so I am sure it is higher now). There is a big difference in the price depending on what part of town you are in too!
I will agree with you though that there does seem to be some relation to the fact the the president and the second in command have big interests in oil and gas. Errr, no wait, I am sure that there is no relation between the price of oil and gas and the fact that the two heading this country are knee deep in it, just like $100,000 from a contributor would not affect our elected officials vote in any way!! They are both laughing all the way to the bank (damn I wish I did own some cows, land, and oil wells and wore cowboy get up).

DickLeonard
08-13-2005, 08:47 PM
I don't blame the regular folks we couldnt get elected, I blame the rest of the country for falling for the same crap time and time again. Big Oil has made Trillions and we have to listen the Bush espouse Democrazy to Iraq, we don't have it here. Any reporter that asks a question that puts George ill at ease will never get to ask another question. George is Hitler the second.####

Voodoo Daddy
08-14-2005, 02:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dg-in-centralpa:</font><hr> Lebanon,Pa - 15 miles east of Hershey/90 miles west of Philly, anywhere from 2.30 to 2.48 per gallon. Too expensive.

DG <hr /></blockquote>

I been doing some road work lately and in Miami I found $2.41 this week for regular and $2.61 as the high...so far. Running back up to Daytona this week coming, I wonder if I could pay more.

mickey2
08-14-2005, 05:29 AM
$2.79 is cheap!
Here in Austria you have to pay 6.1 US$ and more per gallon. In some EU countries it’s even more expansive.

“and was shocked that it cost nearly $30 to pump just 9 gallons of regular into the SUV he says he bought to help stimulate the economy”
People should maybe start to think if they really need cars like this, their gas demand might be part of the problem.

Rich R.
08-14-2005, 05:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Americans are the dumbest people.<hr /></blockquote>Dick, your argument has a lot of merit. Although I agree with you Dick, when you say Americans are dumb, I don't agree for the same reasons.

Just look around, the next time you are on the road. You will see more and more of these huge SUV's and other trucks on the road, topped off by the senseless Hummers. I also include the huge pick-up trucks, owned by people who will never haul anything, but groceries, in them.

Whatever model that was considered huge last year, is not big enough this year.

These SUV's and other trucks are extreme gas guzzlers and Americans are buying more and more of them. Therefore, we are guzzling our way into gas shortages and higher prices.
Of course, the people who own these guzzlers are the first to complain about the higher prices, but they are the last to give up their monster vehicles.

Before anyone jumps on my butt, let me be clear. I have no problem with someone owning an SUV or a truck, if they have a legitamate use for one. However, we all know that there are plenty of them on the road and they will never be used as anything but a normal family vehicle. Most of the Hummers I see, are bright and shiny, with fancy wheels and they will never see any kind of off road use, let alone combat, which was their original use. I don't mean to only pick on the Hummers, they are just an easy target. There are plenty of other gas guzzling SUV's and trucks that fall into the same catagory.

I would venture a guess that at least 95% of all Americans have no practical use for anything more than a normal car or a moderate size SUV, van or truck, with no more than a 6 cylinder motor. If people would buy what they need, rather than getting caught up in the "more is better" syndrome, I think the gas situation in this country would be greatly improved.

JMHO.

Stretch
08-14-2005, 06:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote dg-in-centralpa:</font><hr> Lebanon,Pa - 15 miles east of Hershey/90 miles west of Philly, anywhere from 2.30 to 2.48 per gallon. Too expensive.

DG <hr /></blockquote>

In Eastern Canada we pay the highest price in the country for gas. It's 1.07 per liter! 40 cents of every liter is tax. The sniveling money hungry government only pays lip service to the cryes that the industry should be regulated because the higher the price goes the bigger the windfall of tax money in thier coffers. St.


I been doing some road work lately and in Miami I found $2.41 this week for regular and $2.61 as the high...so far. Running back up to Daytona this week coming, I wonder if I could pay more. <hr /></blockquote>

Stretch
08-14-2005, 06:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Americans are the dumbest people.<hr /></blockquote>Dick, your argument has a lot of merit. Although I agree with you Dick, when you say Americans are dumb, I don't agree for the same reasons.

Just look around, the next time you are on the road. You will see more and more of these huge SUV's and other trucks on the road, topped off by the senseless Hummers. I also include the huge pick-up trucks, owned by people who will never haul anything, but groceries, in them.

Whatever model that was considered huge last year, is not big enough this year.

These SUV's and other trucks are extreme gas guzzlers and Americans are buying more and more of them. Therefore, we are guzzling our way into gas shortages and higher prices.
Of course, the people who own these guzzlers are the first to complain about the higher prices, but they are the last to give up their monster vehicles.

Before anyone jumps on my butt, let me be clear. I have no problem with someone owning an SUV or a truck, if they have a legitamate use for one. However, we all know that there are plenty of them on the road and they will never be used as anything but a normal family vehicle. Most of the Hummers I see, are bright and shiny, with fancy wheels and they will never see any kind of off road use, let alone combat, which was their original use. I don't mean to only pick on the Hummers, they are just an easy target. There are plenty of other gas guzzling SUV's and trucks that fall into the same catagory.

I would venture a guess that at least 95% of all Americans have no practical use for anything more than a normal car or a moderate size SUV, van or truck, with no more than a 6 cylinder motor. If people would buy what they need, rather than getting caught up in the "more is better" syndrome, I think the gas situation in this country would be greatly improved.

JMHO. <hr /></blockquote>

I agree there is more WAIST going on than anything. I own a mini Van but just use it on weekends for Camping, moveing large things, and vacations. I use our small 4 cylinder Toyota Echo for going to work and running errands. It just makes sense. I'm downsizeing even more when the Echo finally croaks we're going to get a Harley or touring bike. Anyone know what the gas millage is for a large Motorcycle? It's way more fun too! St.

Rich R.
08-14-2005, 06:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Stretch:</font><hr> It's way more fun too! St. <hr /></blockquote>
Not in the rain and the snow. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

stickman
08-14-2005, 07:07 AM
"Anyone know what the gas mileage is for a large Motorcycle?"

About 50 MPG. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

stickman
08-14-2005, 07:19 AM
Here in SEKansas it is $2.40. Just a short trip to Missouri, it is about 20 cents less. I hope that it will be free before long. I supposedly won a year's free gas on an internet site. ($1000.00 worth) We are still waiting to see if anything comes to it in the mail.

Barbara
08-14-2005, 07:42 AM
Yikes!!

Here in south NJ it's $2.49 for premium, which my car requires.

But hey, I didn't buy it for its gas mileage. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Barbara

Ralph S.
08-14-2005, 12:42 PM
I like this response alot! You hit the nail on the head Rich. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif I was at the shopping center the other day and a lady pulled her big, bright, shiny Hummer into a parking space in front of the dollar store. I was going there too for some items and she was in the checkout line right in front of me. She was making small talk with the cashier and commenting on all the good buys they have on certain items. After seeing what she spent, about thirty bucks, she immediately started whining that she wouldn't be able to put but about ten dollars worth of gas in her Hummer. She noted she was nearly on empty.

The way I see it, many people buy these vehicles as status symbols. Then they complain about gassing them up. If they can afford to buy them, then they can afford to fuel it, without complaint.

BTW, gas here is $2.65 gallon for regular unleaded.

onepocketfanatic
08-14-2005, 06:24 PM
Gas mileage for a big bike will run around 30-40 MPG. I had a Honda Valk. (1520 cc six cylinder) and I got about 30-35 MPG as long as I kept from twisting the throttle too much (six carbs. tend to drain the tank rapidly). The big two cylinders will get even better since a lot of them have gone to fuel injection now (probably about 35-40).
I agree with the posts above about SUV,s and such. A lot of people live beyond their means (which is their right if they want to pay the bills) just like our government. Always spending more, and wasting more. What ever happened to pay as you go in the days of Slick Willy? Our leaders don't even want to go there (I thought Democrats were the tax and spend crowd....but then I see Republicans just spending and not taxing so I guess there is a difference). Most Americans are lazy and spoiled (I didn't say all mind you)and for a lot of them, it is very important to have these status symbols, even though they are living well beyond their means.
It is amazing that as soon as oil goes up, the price at the pump races up, even though the gas that is being pumped has been in storage for months. When the price comes down, it goes at a crawl. I wonder why congress or someone is not investigating why this happens (oh I had a small brain fart in not remembering that our leaders have to get their cut of the profits from PAC's and such representing these huge corporations).
What a lot of people don't realize is that <font color="red"> </font color> goods are going to start increasing in price since transportation costs will go through the roof when trucking companies start to pass on the fuel costs in what is known in the industry as "fuel surcharges" when fuel goes up so drastically. Here at the small composites company I work for this is already starting to happen. Don't forget that food, clothing, and all daily items that we require are all either moved around by trucks are rail, and the price of fuel will certainly start having an effect on these items in the check out line. So we will not only pay more for gas, but eventually will start paying more for everything as manufacturers start passing on the added costs for shipping!

Rich R.
08-14-2005, 06:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ralph S.:</font><hr> The way I see it, many people buy these vehicles as status symbols. Then they complain about gassing them up. If they can afford to buy them, then they can afford to fuel it, without complaint. <hr /></blockquote>Ralph, I hope these people can't afford to buy fuel for these vehicles. However, most of them can.
My real gripe is, when you combine all of these monster vehicles, and the gas they use, they are contributing greatly to the gas shortage and the high prices for the rest of us. They are also making us dependant on the Mid-Eastern oil producing countries.

Gayle in MD
08-14-2005, 07:07 PM
There you go again, Dick, reading my mind!
Gayle in Md.

Ralph S.
08-14-2005, 08:11 PM
Hi Rich. I watch alot of stuff on the history and discovery channels on tv, and the information you can obtain from them is nothing short of unreal. One of the shows, Modern Marvels, a favorite of mine, had an episode on the Alaskan Pipe Line. Currently, the APL is still producing more than enough oil to supply our country for another 25 years or so. This does not include drilling sites in the oil rich states of Texas, Pennsylvania, and a few select others. This also does not include the Federal Governments emergeny supply in storage which is good for another twenty year supply.

This also goes without including all the offshore drilling sites that the U.S. owns in foreign countries and our own territrial waters like the gulf coast. Like you said, the vast majority of Americans spend first and worry about the after effects later. The oil companies know this and take extreme advantage of this.

As far as the Mid-east oil production, those prices are dependant on the number of millions of barrels of oil they want to produce on a given day. If they want to pump less crude, higher prices. The opposite applies for pumping more crude. All in all, I agree with ya.

Ralph S.&gt;crams his 6'2" 275lb. rear end in a little Chevy Corsica. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

CarolNYC
08-15-2005, 04:21 AM
$2.89 /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

DickLeonard
08-15-2005, 04:59 AM
Gayle, I don't think most people remember the gas shortages of 74 when everyone waited in line for gas only to get to the pump then you would hear the dread oops were out of gas. The automobile industry was making energy efficent cars but nobody was buying them.

Now we give tax credits for people who buy Hummers. The road is loaded with SUVs speeding down the road eating up gas, now everyone has trouble filling them up. They will make nice monuments in the driveway.

I am glad I still have access to your Brain Waves.####

Gayle in MD
08-15-2005, 05:09 AM
Hi Ralph,
You are right on about the history and discovery channels, great programming. I think I saw the show of which you speak, but it doesn't explain why our oil involved president allows the oil companies to gauge us whenever they feel like it. While I agree, Americans have never addressed our dependency on fossil fuels, we keep electing people who are in bed with the oil companies. Maybe after we are gauged for long enough, this time, we will put some "Intelligent Design" into our voting process!

Gayle in Md.

Gayle in MD
08-15-2005, 05:22 AM
Hi Dick,
I remember those lines, I was driving an Oldsmobile Toronado at the time, and Jim was driving a Corvette. I didn't know about the Hummer tax credits. What's the brilliant philosophy behind that one?

My Eldorado is pretty good on gas, but not great. Atleast is uses regular gas. I get about 22 miles per gallon, but the ride is fabulous.

On the brain waves, I'm glad also. BTW, did you see on the news the story about Bush's next door neighbor firing a gun in the air? Typical Texan response, if you don't like something, go for the shot gun, LOL. Oh, and thank goodness Laura has finally made a valuable contribution to society, she hired a new chef, LMAO! Does this woman do anything besides travel, eat, smile, nod???? I hope you and Stretch make it here. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Love,
Gayle

Qtec
08-15-2005, 07:41 AM
Dick, the last election was an ambush! All the other DEms got blasted and Kerry got a free ride from the Reps before he was nominated. They were ready for him. The SwiftBoat mob was all set up to hide the fact that GW didnt have any policies .
In any event, it was a case of vote for this Skull&amp;Bones guy or the other!
12 guys a year become S&amp;B members and out of a Pop. of 300,000,000 and two of them are in the 'final'??????
What are the chances?
And guess what, both are millionaires and one guy,s father was Pres and his brother is a Gov?
What are the chances!!!!!!!!!

Q

Stretch
08-15-2005, 09:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Gayle in MD:</font><hr> Hi Dick,
I remember those lines, I was driving an Oldsmobile Toronado at the time, and Jim was driving a Corvette. I didn't know about the Hummer tax credits. What's the brilliant philosophy behind that one?

My Eldorado is pretty good on gas, but not great. Atleast is uses regular gas. I get about 22 miles per gallon, but the ride is fabulous.

On the brain waves, I'm glad also. BTW, did you see on the news the story about Bush's next door neighbor firing a gun in the air? Typical Texan response, if you don't like something, go for the shot gun, LOL. Oh, and thank goodness Laura has finally made a valuable contribution to society, she hired a new chef, LMAO! Does this woman do anything besides travel, eat, smile, nod???? I hope you and Stretch make it here. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Love,
Gayle

<hr /></blockquote>

I'm counting the days Gayle! St.

eg8r
08-15-2005, 10:38 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I didn't know about the Hummer tax credits. What's the brilliant philosophy behind that one?
<hr /></blockquote> This was a deduction implemented during Clinton's reign, and exaggerated during Bush's. [ QUOTE ]
A 1997 provision in the U.S. tax code (Section 179) provided small businesses with a tax write-off of up to $25,000 for a vehicle weighing more than 6,000 pounds- used 50% of the time for work purposes. The original intent behind this provision was to encourage investments in pickup trucks, minivans, and other needed service vehicles. A far smaller incentive was provided for cars—less than $7,000 over two years.

The explosion of SUV, pickup, and minivan sales in America’s passenger vehicle fleet has turned this small business benefit into a massive loophole in the tax law. Currently, 38 different passenger SUVs including the Lincoln Navigator, which nets a combined 15 miles per gallon according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Cadillac Escalade (16 mpg), the BMW X5 (18 mpg), the Mercedes-Benz ML55 (16 mpg), and the notorious Hummer H2 (estimated 11 mpg) all weigh more than 6,000 pounds. This loophole allows some of the least fuel-efficient passenger vehicles on the road today to qualify for a significant tax break.

In 2003, the Bush administration proposed increasing the tax deduction to $75,000. Lawmakers responded by expanding it to a whopping $100,000 as part of the $350 million tax cut package. Yet Congress did not change the weight-based classification of the vehicles, creating a huge benefit for the largest, least efficient vehicles.
<hr /></blockquote> You can read the rest here (http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/cars_and_suvs/page.cfm?pageID=1280) . From the same article...

[ QUOTE ]
In October 2004, after the House Ways and Means Committee approved a three-year extension of the $100,000 loophole, a House-Senate conference committee negotiated a roll back in the deduction to its original amount of $25,000 as part of the larger Corporate Tax Bill. While tightening this loophole is certainly noteworthy, it is by no means the end of significant tax breaks for gas-guzzling SUVs. According to an analysis in the Detroit News, besides the $25,000 basic equipment deduction, SUVs will still qualify for "bonus depreciation," an added write off of 30 percent of the purchase price above $25,000. Beyond that, additional costs can be deducted according to regular depreciation rules, or 20 percent in the first year. For example, a business owner purchasing a Hummer H1, with a sticker price of $106,185, would be able to deduct $60,722 in the first year under the revised rules: a $25,000 equipment deduction, $24,356 in bonus depreciation, and $11,366 in regular depreciation.
<hr /></blockquote> While the numbers are not as high for the current, more popular H2 (because it is significantly cheaper since it is basically a Chevy Tahoe with a different body), it is still ridiculous.

eg8r

theinel
08-16-2005, 03:42 AM
I don't drive much, just a few miles round-trip to the pool hall every day (the grocery store is on the way home). I almost fell over today when I filled my tank. $2.89 for super, $2.69 for regular unleaded (South Florida). Forgive me but I couldn't help thinking "Nice going W".

theinel
08-16-2005, 03:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> Dick, the last election was an ambush! All the other DEms got blasted and Kerry got a free ride from the Reps before he was nominated. They were ready for him. The SwiftBoat mob was all set up to hide the fact that GW didnt have any policies .
In any event, it was a case of vote for this Skull&amp;Bones guy or the other!
12 guys a year become S&amp;B members and out of a Pop. of 300,000,000 and two of them are in the 'final'??????
What are the chances?
And guess what, both are millionaires and one guy,s father was Pres and his brother is a Gov?
What are the chances!!!!!!!!!

Q <hr /></blockquote>

Q, I hate to be on the conspiracy theorist bandwagon on this one but yeah, the odds are astronomical. How do right wing extremists (G.W.) and left wing liberals (J.K.) know each other let alone belong to the same club.

Power corrupts.

eg8r
08-16-2005, 05:09 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I don't drive much, just a few miles round-trip to the pool hall every day (the grocery store is on the way home). I almost fell over today when I filled my tank. $2.89 for super, $2.69 for regular unleaded (South Florida). Forgive me but I couldn't help thinking "Nice going W". <hr /></blockquote> You are blaming Bush for high gas prices? Care to explain?

eg8r

SnakebyteXX
08-16-2005, 05:49 AM
Gas prices around the world

Think you pay a lot for gas? Perhaps you'd prefer to live in Venezuela.

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) – Gasoline prices in the United States, which have recently hit record highs, are actually much lower than in many countries. Drivers in some European cities, like Amsterdam and Oslo, are paying nearly 3 times more than those in the U.S.

The main factor in price disparities between countries is government policy, according to AirInc, a company that tracks the cost of living in various places around the world. Many European nations tax gasoline heavily, with taxes making up as much as 75 percent of the cost of a gallon of gasoline, said a spokesperson for AirInc.

In a few Latin America and Middle-East nations, such as Venezuela and Saudi Arabia, oil is produced by a government-owned company and local gasoline prices are kept low as a benefit to the nation's citizens, he said. All prices updated March, 2005.

Nation City Price in USD Regular/Gallon

Netherlands Amsterdam $6.48

Norway Oslo $6.27

Italy Milan $5.96

Denmark Copenhagen $5.93

Belgium Brussels $5.91

Sweden Stockholm $5.80

United Kingdom London $5.79

Germany Frankfurt $5.57

France Paris $5.54

Portugal Lisbon $5.35

Hungary Budapest $4.94

Luxembourg $4.82

Croatia Zagreb $4.81

Ireland Dublin $4.78

Switzerland Geneva $4.74

Spain Madrid $4.55

Japan Tokyo $4.24

Czech Republic Prague $4.19

Romania Bucharest $4.09

Andorra $4.08

Estonia Tallinn $3.62

Bulgaria Sofia $3.52

Brazil Brasilia $3.12

Cuba Havana $3.03

Taiwan Taipei $2.84

Lebanon Beirut $2.63

South Africa Johannesburg $2.62

Nicaragua Managua $2.61

Panama Panama City $2.19

Russia Moscow $2.10

Puerto Rico San Juan $1.74

Saudi Arabia Riyadh $0.91

Kuwait Kuwait City $0.78

Egypt Cairo $0.65

Nigeria Lagos $0.38

Venezuela Caracas $0.12

web page (http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/)

Rich R.
08-16-2005, 06:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ralph S.:</font><hr> Ralph S.&gt;crams his 6'2" 275lb. rear end in a little Chevy Corsica. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif <hr /></blockquote>
Ralph, I'm not a small person either. Other than a car my wife owned, when we were married over 30 years ago, I have never owned a car with more than six cylinders.

theinel
08-17-2005, 01:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr>You are blaming Bush for high gas prices? Care to explain?

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>
I wouldn't dream of it. Why? Do you think he's responsible?

SnakebyteXX
08-17-2005, 07:11 AM
Gas pumps' shock waves

By Dale Kasler -- Bee Staff Writer

Gasoline prices set more records Tuesday - and triggered fears from Wall Street to Main Street that energy costs may be starting to nibble away at economic growth.
As gas rose a penny to an average $2.77 a gallon in California, mega-retailer Wal-Mart Stores Inc. spooked the stock market by blaming fuel prices for lower-than-expected sales. Meanwhile, the U.S. government reported that inflation spiked up 0.5 percent in July, largely because of energy costs.

The inflation news represented "the most solid evidence we've had so far that this is something to think about," said Howard Roth, chief economist at the state Department of Finance. "Inflation is in our future."

Gas and diesel prices have been setting records practically every day lately, and Tuesday was no exception. Sacramentans paid a record average of $2.71 a gallon, up 2 cents from the day before, for self-serve regular. San Franciscans paid $2.83, up a fraction of a cent, also a record.

In Eureka, the average price hit $2.91 a gallon, the highest in Northern California, according to AAA.

Diesel fuel rose a penny to a statewide record average of $3.13 a gallon.

Meanwhile, the nationwide average for gasoline jumped 4 cents a gallon to a record $2.52.

And it didn't appear there was any immediate help on the way. Although crude oil fell 19 cents a barrel, to $66.08, the price was expected to stabilize or go up again.

Denton Cinquegrana, who tracks West Coast petroleum markets for the Oil Price Information Service, said retail gas prices in California could easily go up another 10 cents a gallon.

"You probably won't see relief until after around Columbus Day," he said.

But while prices usually ease after the summer driving season ends, Roth said the state and nation appear to have entered an era of chronically high fuel prices. Beyond geopolitical concerns in the Middle East, Venezuela and other oil-producing regions, the soaring demand for petroleum in China and India is keeping upward pressure on prices.

"China's not going away," Roth said. "Countries like China and India are very big and growing very fast, and they want a lot of gasoline.

"The trend is obvious that it's going up," he added. "I'm not sure where it stops."

The U.S. Labor Department said the "core" rate of inflation, which doesn't count volatile sectors like food and energy, was a mere 0.1 percent in July. But when energy prices were added in, the inflation rate hit 0.5 percent, the highest one-month jump since April.

The news about inflation and Wal-Mart sent the Dow Jones average down 120.93 points, to 10,513.45. The S&amp;P 500 and Nasdaq markets also fell.

Even though Wal-Mart's profits were stronger than expected, the retailer's stock fell $1.53 to $47.57 per share after it reported second-quarter revenue that fell short of investment analysts' predictions. The company also warned that profits in the third quarter would fall below expectations because of gas prices.

Retailers like Wal-Mart can be especially vulnerable, but shares of other retailers, from Abercrombie &amp; Fitch Co. to Limited Brands, also fell as investors feared the impact of energy costs on a broad range of consumers.

The price of gas "can make a big difference for people who are low income or low-middle income," Roth said.

Gloria Montgomery knows all about it. As she purchased gas at the 76 station at Fruitridge Road and Freeport Boulevard in Sacramento, where regular sold for $2.74 a gallon, she made sure to stop filling when the pump hit $10 exactly.

"That's all I could do. That's all I had left," said Montgomery, who lives on $723 in monthly disability payments for a lung problem. Montgomery, who attends Sacramento City College, said the high fuel cost has forced her to take fewer classes and cut back on food purchases.

"For people on a fixed income, it's affecting them pretty bad," she said.

A report by the California Energy Commission said gas prices are prompting motorists to conserve. An analysis of fuel sales from the first four months of the year showed a drop in consumption of one-half of 1 percent compared to a year ago, despite the state's increase in population.

Meanwhile, AAA travel agents are noticing that motorists are scaling back their vacation plans to save fuel, said spokesman Sean Comey.

"People are still traveling, but perhaps they're traveling closer to home than before," Comey said. "Everybody wants to take a vacation but the fuel prices have people re-evaluating their plans."

AAA said California's average gas price has jumped 18 cents in one month and a whopping 82 cents since January.

web page (http://www.sacbee.com/content/business/story/13428260p-14269498c.html)

ras314
08-17-2005, 09:18 AM
Gas here has been $2.84 for about a week. The station owner tells me his next delivery will run the cost a little over $3.00. I don't recall gas being under $2.40 since last winter.

Some locals have gone to the shoe box cars, but they aren't very attractive in hilly country. Won't haul much wood either, probably 90% of houses use wood heat. Pickups are common here, with good reason.

eg8r
08-17-2005, 09:22 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Gas and diesel prices have been setting records practically every day lately, and Tuesday was no exception. Sacramentans paid a record average of $2.71 a gallon, up 2 cents from the day before, for self-serve regular. San Franciscans paid $2.83, up a fraction of a cent, also a record.
<hr /></blockquote> These so called "records" are deceiving. The gas prices in the early 80's when looked at in today's dollars were averaging $3.03/gallon and the oil was $90/barrel. We are getting close to those numbers but not there yet.

So when are we going to start building more refineries and start drilling in Alaska?

eg8r

DickLeonard
08-18-2005, 03:12 PM
Eg8r. Go back and read my post I am blaming the Dumb Americans who elected the Third President from Texas. The same thing happened with the last two.They took us to war and the price of gas Skyrocketed. Two of the Three Lied about the reason to go to War. With Johnson the Gulf of Tonkin was a lie, with Bush the WMD was a lie. Of course the oil companies are in Texas, the Army,Air Force bases are in Texas. It is a win/win for Texas and a lose/lose for America.

Now the sane Americans have to rid ourselves of Texas, sell it back to Mexico. Stop Space exploration put the scientists out of work and give Cape Canveral to the Disney Corporation.####

Stretch
08-24-2005, 10:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Eg8r. Go back and read my post I am blaming the Dumb Americans who elected the Third President from Texas. The same thing happened with the last two.They took us to war and the price of gas Skyrocketed. Two of the Three Lied about the reason to go to War. With Johnson the Gulf of Tonkin was a lie, with Bush the WMD was a lie. Of course the oil companies are in Texas, the Army,Air Force bases are in Texas. It is a win/win for Texas and a lose/lose for America.

Now the sane Americans have to rid ourselves of Texas, sell it back to Mexico. Stop Space exploration put the scientists out of work and give Cape Canveral to the Disney Corporation.#### <hr /></blockquote>

DICK FOR PRESIDENT!!!!!! St.

hondo
08-24-2005, 11:21 AM
What I find interesting is that he never mentions
it. Even some bull... sympathy from him like he
supposedly has for all our kids dying in that " noble
cause" would be nice.


<hr /></blockquote> You are blaming Bush for high gas prices? Care to explain?

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>

hondo
08-24-2005, 11:22 AM
West Virginia- $2.64 a gallon!!!

DickLeonard
08-25-2005, 01:15 PM
Qtec the both graduated from Yale and were members of the Skull and Crossbones.####

DickLeonard
08-25-2005, 01:18 PM
Stretch do you think Gayle would consider running for Vice President?####

Qtec
08-25-2005, 02:32 PM
At least the oil companies are making record profits. /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif Lets not forget the other big winners- the oil producers ie, Saudi Arabia.

Q

SPetty
08-25-2005, 04:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Stretch:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> I am blaming the Dumb Americans who elected the Third President from Texas. ... Of course the oil companies are in Texas, the Army, Air Force bases are in Texas. It is a win/win for Texas and a lose/lose for America.

Now the sane Americans have to rid ourselves of Texas, sell it back to Mexico.<hr /></blockquote>DICK FOR PRESIDENT!!!!!! St. <hr /></blockquote>I would like you both to understand that your comments are very hurtful to some Texans out here. Not all Texans are rich lying oil tycoons. In fact, very few of us are. Most of us are just people.

hondo
08-25-2005, 04:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Qtec the both graduated from Yale and
were members of the Skull and Crossbones.#### <hr /></blockquote>

Tap! Tap! Tap! You got it, Dick.

hondo
08-25-2005, 04:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Stretch do you think Gayle would consider running for Vice President?#### <hr /></blockquote>

Hondo is thinking about running....... for the border.

PoolFool
08-26-2005, 06:33 AM
SPetty, we don't pay much attention to comments like that.
Considering the facts, Texas only has one major oil co. located here. Exxon-Mobil is in Dallas but Mobil was headquartered in New York and Fairfax, VA before the merger.
Chevron-Texaco is in CA, BP owns Arco and Amaco, Shell is a Dutch company and our good friends the French own Fina.
Bless thier hearts, they are just a little confussed.

PoolFool

DickLeonard
08-26-2005, 08:02 AM
SPetty, you could run for VP all you would have to do is change your address to Montana. For the life of me I still can't understand how Dick US Cheney was allowed to just move to another State to circumvent the law that no two people from the same state could run for the highest offices in the land.

It just shows their contemp for the laws of our Land.####

DickLeonard
08-26-2005, 08:11 AM
Qtec, Saudia Arabia is the next on our list to bring Democrazy to the people. When 15 of the 18 terrorist at 9/11 were from Saudia Arabia that was reason enough for
me to go to War with them. Except that the Bush's were so far up their asses it was never considered.

55% of the terrorists in Iraq come from Saudia Arabia. We must strike them where it hurts accept no more Saudia oil. Really put it to them.HaHa.####

DickLeonard
08-26-2005, 08:19 AM
RichR, I owned a 1968 OLds 98 with a 455 engine that I would get 30 miles to the gallon on the open road. The only time you didn't was if you pushed down on the gas pedal. Crusing along it was better than most cars, I would go back and forth to NJ during the shortage and never ran out.####

Vagabond
08-28-2005, 04:58 AM
For an Imperial Gallon in Grand Cayman,Cayman Islands.It is not bad compared to the prices of other items.
Vagabond /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

pooldaddy9
08-28-2005, 05:56 AM
It dropped to 2.46 for reg. 2.59 for Plus 2.69 for prem. here in S.C.

c.holtz009
09-02-2005, 06:56 PM
Not in the U.S., however, we here in Canada are paying $1.35 per litre. If you do the math (4.5 litres to the gallon) it works out to in and around $6.07 a gallon.
HOLY #*@&amp;%^$!!!!!!!!

rukiddingme
09-03-2005, 02:37 AM
Suburb of Chicago....87 octane unleaded
2.73 on Monday...the day the hurricane hit N.O.
3.29 on Friday
ruk

Rich R.
09-03-2005, 05:49 AM
Here in Maryland, yesterday, somehow a rumor got started that, because of the hurricane disaster, the gas stations were going to close at 4:00 pm, for the weekend. This rumor spread rapidly and many people panicked and headed for the gas stations.

Then the gas stations started raising their prices.
The local news showed some stations posting prices as high as $7.50 per gallon.

Of course, there was no shortage and the gas stations were not closing.

The governor came out and made public statements to attempt to correct the situation. By early evening, most of the gas stations had dropped their prices down to the correct, but still high level.

State officials are going to be investigating the stations that were obviously trying to gouge the public with the extremely high prices.
I hope they prosecute them all.

ARJ
09-08-2005, 07:11 PM
By the way in South Florida it's $2.96 at my gas station

AR J