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jerrodbottini
08-15-2005, 10:12 PM
Ok I bought a 5280 pool cue and it only comes in a 13mm When I got the cue it was straight. Then I took it to a well known cue maker... When I got the cue back the shaft was Warped... Who do you think is responsible for this cue??? The cue maker says it was warped when it came in.. But I think it is the cue makers responsibilty to show this to you when he picks it up for repair Ex. Or do you think I should call the manufacture about this shaft.. And what steps should I take to get a straight shaft???

Thanks Jerrod

tateuts
08-15-2005, 10:22 PM
The shaft was going to warp no matter where it was stored, your place or the cue-makers. These sort of cues are rushed through production and it's a crap shoot as to whether or not the shaft will warp. You can probably get another shaft cheap and it may warp just as quickly. Not worth the stress, get a McDermott or a Joss.

Chris

jerrodbottini
08-15-2005, 10:35 PM
The Shaft did not warp untill it was turned down....

Cueless Joey
08-16-2005, 12:18 AM
Sorry, but the maker/repairman is not responsible for shafts turned down that warped. He should have warned you about the possibility. I don't know why he didn't because those imports are prone to that.
When you turn down shafts, you are taking a layer or layers of wood that keep that shaft straight. The more layers the wood has, the more stable it is. A 13MM tipped shaft with a stiff taper will stay straighter than a 12.75MM tipped shaft with a loose taper.
5280 is not going to take it back b/c it has been turned down.

Sid_Vicious
08-16-2005, 08:06 AM
Are you certain that it's the shaft and not a joint problem? If the shaft itself rolls badly, then you have no avenues but to accept it as the way it is, life dealt you a lemon. BUT if the cue joint has been stressed, say from leaning against something and then being bumped,,,you'd have something to discuss for yourself...sid

BANKS77
08-16-2005, 11:53 PM
Any cue shaft can warp. I bought an expensive cue from Billy Schick years ago that had a shaft that warped within two weeks of receiving it. Billy probably would have made good on another but he was opening a pool room out of state at the time and I never got a hold of him. Also, I ordered a Joss West through John Wright and the next day I noticed one of the shafts was warped, not much but when you pay big bucks you expect a straight shaft. In that case Bill Stroud sent me out a new shaft no problem. I've been out of the game for a while but the cuemakers with the best shafts out there were Craig Peterson, Joey Gold, and Barry Szamboti.

sliprock
08-18-2005, 08:04 AM
IMO, The shaft was gonna warp eventually. The re-taper just accellerated the warp. Cues are built all over the world and while a shaft is in my shop it may turn perfectly, and stay perfect as long as it stays in my area. If the shaft ever gets sold or moved to another climate, the wood will react to the different climate and could warp. Most custom cue builders take extreme care in turning their shafts and treating their wood against warping but mother nature has the last word. High volume cue builders such as the cue you bought will turn out the shafts way faster than they should and warping is always a crapshoot.

Having said that, Your repairman should have warned you of the possibility, but he shouldn't be held responsible. The warp actually is a result of the building process. These cues are inexpensive for a reason.

Sid_Vicious
08-18-2005, 08:22 AM
I'm having new shafts made soon and the builder said two weeks turn around, but actually the job sounds like it's all done in a week. My question is, can the shaft be turned down to it's final condition in just a week without worry of losing the ability to "season" and stay straight? I always heard that the cuemakers of reputation turned down blanks a little, and staged them for weeks or months, then repeated the process several times, giving the shaft lots of time to get it's own behavioral shape. Is a shaft that's snapped out in just days or weeks as good???sid

pooltchr
08-18-2005, 09:01 AM
Sid,
Most of them have a good supply of shafts in various stages of completion. The shaft he is finishing in a week, may have actually begun the process months or years ago.
Steve

DickLeonard
08-19-2005, 05:06 AM
Sid, Paul Dayton the cuemaker I am most acquainted with has shafts hanging for months and every so often he takes off a little then rehangs the shaft. He said the older cues had old growth wood but the shafts of today are new growth and easier to warp.

Paul is lucky he managed to buy a large quanitey of old growth hard rock maple dug up from a dried up river bed.####

Sid_Vicious
08-19-2005, 07:11 AM
That's what I understand many do, so it prompted me to wonder about these quick turnaround shaft creations. In defense of my particular upcoming shaftwork being done, these are laminated blanks, so I'm in a better boat than the general maple blanks which may or may not have any real age to speak of prior to their turning down. I have had this thought about the quickie shafts for a while though after hearing that other players and friends have gone and gotten a new shaft in a short week's time, but maybe the stock was indeed well seasoned. I'd always wonder though unless I either got as guarantee or knew the reputation of the maker ahead of time. Just because somebody gets a shaft which is still straight after some years of time, to me, is nothing more the possible luck of the draw, and the next shaft off of his line may very well warp in short fashion(IMO.)

I like the old way of doing things myself...sid

tateuts
08-19-2005, 07:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BANKS77:</font><hr> Any cue shaft can warp. I bought an expensive cue from Billy Schick years ago that had a shaft that warped within two weeks of receiving it. Billy probably would have made good on another but he was opening a pool room out of state at the time and I never got a hold of him. Also, I ordered a Joss West through John Wright and the next day I noticed one of the shafts was warped, not much but when you pay big bucks you expect a straight shaft. In that case Bill Stroud sent me out a new shaft no problem. I've been out of the game for a while but the cuemakers with the best shafts out there were Craig Peterson, Joey Gold, and Barry Szamboti. <hr /></blockquote>

Some companies are better than others at storage, checking moisture content, and taking their time. Wood needs time to acclimate before you work on it. Going from one climate to another changes the moisture and increases the chance of warpage.

I have a lot of old cues, 40 years old plus, and many of them are still dead straight. Ocassionally I will have a shaft re-made for one, and I noticed that the new shafts will warp in a few months, or they will just stay straight. So for that reason I agree that a cue maker should take their time and turn down the shafts over a period of months. That way, if a shaft is going to warp, they can just get rid of it before doing all the other work.

I ordered 5 or 6 shafts from Meucci at different intervals, stored them in my climate controlled house, and all but one warped (a little) in a few months.

As far as laminated shafts go, my understanding is if they are going to warp, they do so pretty quickly. My Predators have all stayed perfectly straight. My friend's Tiger shafts are dead perfect too.

Chris

Cueless Joey
08-19-2005, 08:29 AM
Imo, Tad has the best shafts in the world.
His shop has no humidifier or dehumidifier.
His shop is here in SoCal where the humidity averages around 45-55%. It gets to the low 20's and 90's during extreme days.
The key to having stable shafts out in the world is not preventing them from warping in the shop. If they warp in the shop, you toss them. If you keep a shop at 75 degrees with 50% humidity everyday of the year, those shafts hanging are not going to move much. What happens when they get out of the shop?

theinel
08-20-2005, 02:34 AM
Many years ago I bought two Stradivarii, ground them up, bound the shavings together with a mixture of Italian binding agent and gently crushed paving stone in a forgiving mold (pro taper) and after years of adjustments have produced the finest shaft the world has ever known. It hits like a ton of brick, and produces a sound and feel even angels can only dream of. It's three slightly flawed and mistreated siblings will go on auction tomorrow at pipedreams.com, best wishes to the highest bidder(s) /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Wood is a living breathing material. Every piece is capable of failure in any number of ways.

May all cue makers be blessed with long life and great success.