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scaramouche
08-20-2005, 03:05 PM
Things I have read:

Once you have lined up a shot, you should be able to make it with your eyes closed.

Once you have decided where you want to hit he cue ball, you should concentrate on the spot on the object ball you are aiming at.

If you miss, it is because you didn't hit the cue ball where you intended. This would suggest that one should concentrate on the hit on the cue ball, not on the object ball. In fact, I came across a snooker instruction site that says this is the better procedure.

Scaramouche - He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad

dg-in-centralpa
08-20-2005, 03:47 PM
I don't know - but I concentrate on both, cueball and object ball.

DG - can you do the fandango

Jal
08-20-2005, 04:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote scaramouche:</font><hr> Things I have read:

Once you have lined up a shot, you should be able to make it with your eyes closed.

Once you have decided where you want to hit he cue ball, you should concentrate on the spot on the object ball you are aiming at.

If you miss, it is because you didn't hit the cue ball where you intended. This would suggest that one should concentrate on the hit on the cue ball, not on the object ball. In fact, I came across a snooker instruction site that says this is the better procedure.

Scaramouche - He was born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad
<hr /></blockquote>

The answer given in instructional books and videos is to look at the object ball last, after moving your eyes back and forth between the object ball and cueball. I think it's good advice.

Generally speaking, I think it's a waste of two perfectly good eyeballs to look at the cueball last. Our proprioceptive system (sorry, don't know a shorter word for it) - the sense which tells us how our bodies are oriented -is very good, in my opinion, at providing feedback as to what direction we're pointing the cue, even when not looking at it. So if you fix your gaze on the object ball before pulling the trigger, you're getting sensory information on the positions of both the stick and the object ball up until the bitter end.

A demonsration of this is to set up some straight shots so that they're lined up to hit about a diamond or so from a pocket. Then make the adjustment to pot while looking only at the object ball. I haven't done this exhaustively, but have been successfull the few times I've tried it.

Just something to consider.

Jim

Sid_Vicious
08-20-2005, 07:05 PM
I too see all of the shot, table view and all except for specialty strokes where you HAVE to hit the CB exactly right. I'm not sure it's proper but I'd have to say that looking at the CB last seems to make as much sense with the analogy of closing the eyes and making the shot...sid~~~just needs to keep his eyes off of the skirts when they cruise by /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

sneakypapi
08-21-2005, 12:30 AM
I have thought about this subject many times. When I shoot I know sometimes I will make a conscious effort to look at the object ball last, but I know many times I have a habit of looking at blend of both or just the cue ball since I am already lined up for the shot. I will tell you this that most pros will look at the object ball last, watch closely on TV and you will notice it, so most people say looking at the object ball last is correct.

GeraldG
08-21-2005, 05:10 AM
For me it depends on the shot. For a normal shot, I look at the object ball last and try to really key in on the exact spot where I want to contact the object ball with the cueball. For the break shot in 9-ball, 7-ball, 8-ball or 10-ball (power break shots), jump shots, masse' shots, and for shots where the cueball is frozen to the rail, I look at the cueball last.

Scott Lee
08-21-2005, 09:48 AM
This is the correct response. It depends on the shot. Which ball is more important...CB or OB. For certain shots (breaks, jumps, masses, kicks) the CB is more important, and therefore you should be looking there last. Although I look at the CB last on almost ALL shots, it's not that important where you look last...as it is a momentary transition, which happens seconds (or milliseconds) before the commitment stroke. What is important is HOW you transition your eyes from ball to ball. It's what we teach as PEP, or Personal Eye Patterns. There are three specific times for this transition...1)at the final pause at the CB, 2) AS you initiate your final backswing, or 3) at the pause in the backswing to make the physcial transition to the forward stroke.

Also, the 'quiet eye' theory, researched in FL a few years ago, showed definitively that looking at both the OB and CB fewer times, but focusing longer on each ball, worked much better than the normal eye pattern movements, which we call 'ping-ponging', or looking back and forth many times, for short durations.

Scott Lee

onepocketfanatic
08-21-2005, 10:20 AM
On "normal shots" I have picked out the contact point on the object ball before ever getting down on the table. As a matter of fact, I have decided everything before getting down on the ball (english, cue ball contact speed, etc). Once down on the ball, I stoke the cue ball once or twice where I want to make contact with the cue (ping ponging back and forth between the cue ball and object ball), then pause, and while pausing look at nothing but the contact point on the object ball until the cue ball hits the contact point.