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View Full Version : Blotchy white spots on Green Simonis-860 cloth.



volleyslice
08-21-2005, 06:26 PM
I'd recently changed to Simonis cloth for my pool table; green. I happen to notice, rather obvious marks; blotchy white spots. Seems like it's stained; all over the table. I've brushed it, vacuumed. Only in vain. Well, the spots become a little shot of invisible and clean, but, after few weeks comes right back.

Do I've to brush up my pool-table brushing technique ?

cueball1950
08-21-2005, 08:00 PM
Are the sppots mainly at the head string area where you break from. alot of times these spots can be caused by jumping or jacking up on a ball. anyshot you hit the cueball hard on can also cause these. unfortunately i have never seen anyone that cleans tables being able to get rid of them. Everytime the cueball hops will cause these also. hopes this helps.............mike

woody_968
08-22-2005, 12:14 AM
These are normally called "burn" marks and there isnt much you can do about them. As the other poster noted you will first notice them at the head string where you break from.

When I first had my table covered I started using a "break pad" to keep from getting them and I am glad I did. Take a small piece of cloth that was left over from when they covered your table and place it under the cueball before you break. It will keep you from marking the table and doesnt really effect the break. Just pick it up before a ball comes back and hits it.

You will still get the line from the cueball to the rack, but it will protect your cloth (at the headstring)if you break from the same place all the time.

DialUp
08-22-2005, 12:56 AM
Don't worry about 'em. Before you know it, the table will have a pretty uniform texture of white burn marks. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

There are other cloth manufacturers who claim to have less burn marks. Champion tour edition gets em bad too. A salesman told me the Brunswick Centenial cloth won't get the burn marks. Don't know if thats true though. Afterall, he was a salesman...

quelicin
08-22-2005, 03:54 AM
I recently had a Fast Play 19oz cloth put on my table and was told that the burn marks would be more prevelant on the fast play felt vs slower felt. They told me to anytime you hit the ball hard or put back spin on the CB that you would get these marks and they would not affect game play.

SnakebyteXX
08-22-2005, 06:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote woody_968:</font><hr> These are normally called "burn" marks and there isnt much you can do about them. As the other poster noted you will first notice them at the head string where you break from.

When I first had my table covered I started using a "break pad" to keep from getting them and I am glad I did. Take a small piece of cloth that was left over from when they covered your table and place it under the cueball before you break. It will keep you from marking the table and doesnt really effect the break. Just pick it up before a ball comes back and hits it.

You will still get the line from the cueball to the rack, but it will protect your cloth (at the headstring)if you break from the same place all the time. <hr /></blockquote>

Not trying to ignite any controversy here but it's my understanding that 'burn marks' aren't really cloth burns at all - they're trails and spots made by fragments of phenolic resin rubbing off the cue ball (in some cases - object balls).

It's well known that the weight of pool balls (particularly the cue ball) will diminish depending on how much time in play is involved. This loss of weight can be attributed to the friction between ball and cloth due to the wear and tear on balls in play. It is most obvious where a ball has been regularly travelling at high speed or is in use most often. IE: the cue ball on the break skidding and/or bouncing.

I own my own table. It's covered in Simonis 860 and has an automatic ball return. Not long after setting up the table I began to notice the same pattern of burn marks that others have seen. Over time I've also noticed a pattern of 'multiple rolling burn marks' or streaks that appear in the area between where I first rack the balls against the foot rail and then roll them out to the spot.

I recently tried a product called 'Quick Clean' that's designed specifically to dry clean pool table cloth quickly and easily. The product appears to work as claimed with the added benefit of masking many (most?) of the existing 'burn marks'. I've had my table set up for over a year now and until now have been using a hand vac daily to keep the playing surface free of grit and grime. From the very first use the Quick Clean product seems to have restored my cloth to a near brand new appearance. So far, with Quick Clean, I really like what I see (or don't see re: 'burn marks').

Just my dos centavos and worth what you paid for them.

Snake

woody_968
08-22-2005, 06:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SnakebyteXX:</font><hr> Not trying to ignite any controversy here but it's my understanding that 'burn marks' aren't really cloth burns at all - they're trails and spots made by fragments of phenolic resin rubbing off the cue ball (in some cases - object balls).
<hr /></blockquote>

No controversy ingnited /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I didnt say they WERE burn marks, just that that is what they are often called LOL.

I dont know that I buy the resin being the reason we see them either. I know when I give a lesson on my table and I want to mark the position of a ball I can create one of these marks by hitting one ball on top of the other. There is no movement so I dont think resin is rubbing off. Its just makeing a small depression in the cloth.

Woody

Fred Agnir
08-22-2005, 10:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SnakebyteXX:</font><hr> Not trying to ignite any controversy here but it's my understanding that 'burn marks' aren't really cloth burns at all - they're trails and spots made by fragments of phenolic resin rubbing off the cue ball (in some cases - object balls).<hr /></blockquote>

Could be, but I doubt it. If I knew anything about plastics, I'd guess it's the Nylon discoloring because of the heat.

Fred

petel
08-22-2005, 01:09 PM
Also, be careful when selecting a cleaner/polisher. I have found some that have ammonia in them. Yes ammonia. Very bad for cloth. Most the time I think it dissipates before causing any damage.

GeorgeV
08-22-2005, 06:09 PM
I have Simonis 860 on my table and also experience the white "burn marks". I read on this forum or AZB several months ago that it was caused by the friction of the balls rubbing off some of the color on the fibers of the cloth, which are white. When using Quick Clean, the dampness causes some of the green coloring from the surrounding area to re-color the white spots. It seems to do just that. Each time I use Quick Clean, my white spots fill in, not always totally and not every time. Depends on how bad the spot was. After a few applications, tho, they do fill in completely. FWIW.