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Sid_Vicious
08-27-2005, 08:58 AM
Ok there are switches in executing a shot, maybe putting the chalk down with a click for example, but I'm wanting to know if players use physical switches in their final set/stance right before their final stroke and follow through. I'm finding that for myself I have an iota of stance shift which gives me a more solid and "rememberable" feeling all over from the nerve ending in the grip hand through the feet and progressing into the "stay down" and trust your stroke features, all of these(for me) set in place(for me today) with a simple shift into and very slightly up at that last moment ahead of the stroke.

Do you have any physical switches you'd like to share, secrets maybe, taught methods, whatever? The chalk thing hitting the rail is understandable but I'm talking about that very last thing before committment JUST ahead of the stroke while over the shot. Focus and concentration, can it be anchored with a physical switch without being distracting and eventually eroding your flow??? Thanks...sid

Leviathan
08-27-2005, 10:43 AM
Hi, Sid:

I'll be interested to see what the experts say about this. I don't have a physical switch of the kind you describe, but I'm only an intermediate player. What I want in the last few seconds before I pull the trigger is physical and mental stillness. My visual focus is on my line of aim and my mental focus is on cueball speed. I try not to think about stroke mechanics at all during this period; I try to let the stroke happen. I do think that awareness of a physical switch would distract me, at least until it was solidly incorporated into my preshot routine. As I said, though, I'm curious to see what expert players or teachers think about this.

Regards,
AS

pooltchr
08-28-2005, 07:39 PM
Sid,
The first time I went to pool school, Randy spotted the fact that I was gripping a bit too tightly during my delivery. He suggested just tapping my pinky finger against the butt as a reminder to relax. It became a habit that probably works at the last minute "trigger" that it's time to stroke the ball.
Steve

Sid_Vicious
08-29-2005, 06:22 AM
I actually find that for today the physical switch gives me dedication and less distraction at stroke delivery and allows me to then trust my stroke even more. It hasn't had much time to prove out yet, but worked beautifully for me yesterday for 3 cheap sets which I won, first one a 5-0, no brag, just fact. The guy whom I haven't played in a while said at the end, "You've improved." I was happy with those words...sid

DickLeonard
08-29-2005, 06:48 AM
Sid I find that most of my misses are caused by my thinking about something that I am trying to add to my stroke or grip. When your playing all the time everything goes together like a puzzle but when your only playing two hours a week it is impossible to refine your grip,stance,bridge,etc. ####

DickLeonard
08-29-2005, 06:53 AM
Levithan I will give you Babe Cranfield's secret for improving your ability to put the cueball where you want it to go. He played with a quarter moving it around then trying to make the shot and land the cueball as close to the quarter as he could. If your not confident you could start with a Silver Dollar then work your way down to a Dime.####

bluey2king
08-29-2005, 08:54 AM
Yes I have one. I use it in my pre-shot routine. As I line up my shot standing when I decide what stroke, speed, and english then I tap my thumb to my second finger on both hands. I am holding my cue and I do this around the cue. Then (I am working on this OK) let my mind go clear get set a few pratice strokes and let it go.
I too would like to know what other are doing and why!!
Let me know what you decide on using

Cane
08-29-2005, 02:33 PM
Yep, mine is the chalk. I carry it around, think about what I'm need to consider (angle, speed, spin) then when I've made my final decision, I get in line with the shot, chalk my cue, and lay it down, to the right of where I'll be shooting from... When that chalk hits the rail cap, all thinking ceases and performing begins. I honestly, had I not videotaped myself so many times, wouldn't be able to tell you what I do after the chalk hits the rail cap. Brain just goes into a different world!

Later,
Bob

Nostalgia
08-30-2005, 04:40 AM
The switch I use comes just after my final practice stroke, immediately after my eyes focus on the object ball. I take a breath and a long blink. The blink seems to cement in my head the picture of what I want to happen.

-Joe

DickLeonard
08-30-2005, 05:41 AM
Cane, Babe Cranfield had this habit of moving the chalk to the diamonds when playing. I don't know if there was a reason to move the chalk to different diamonds.####

Cane
08-30-2005, 12:42 PM
Dick, There's another thing I do... kinda quirky... I pick up one piece of chalk when I'm walking the table, looking over the layout. I put a piece of chalk on the rail cap and my goal will be to put the CB on a line between that piece of chalk and my next OB. Kind of gives me a more tangable target to shoot at. It drives some crazy... "Why in the hell do you have to move all the chalk on the table all the time?" is a regular rant by opponents. "I dunno" is my stock answer... but it really does give me a bit of a target "line" to put my cue ball on. Works well for me.

Anyways, after that ritual, I pick up another piece of chalk and chalk my cue and go from there!

Pool players are strange folks, aren't we!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Later,
Bob

Leviathan
08-31-2005, 10:49 AM
Hi, Dick. Work my way down to a dime?! Hell, I can't even see a dime! Was Cranfield interesting to play against?

AS

100andout
08-31-2005, 05:13 PM
Sid, When I'm practicing, I work on all sorts of things that get me calm and focused, or whatever may need work that given day.

My input here would be to let all of the routines, or thoughts of drills go by the wayside when playing. Let your game flow with as little forced input as possible. In other words, let the work you've put in do its thing.

One constant I use in all games, especially 14.1 is to have a 100% commited plan BEFORE getting down to shoot. I find when I don't execute at the table , it can almost always be tracked back to not commiting to a plan of attack with a pin point purpose on the up coming shot.

Good luck.............G

Nostalgia
08-31-2005, 06:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr>He played with a quarter moving it around then trying to make the shot and land the cueball as close to the quarter as he could.<hr /></blockquote>
Criminy, I'll have to start with a Frisbee /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Thanks for the tip,
-Joe

DickLeonard
09-01-2005, 02:53 PM
Leviathan. The Babe was a great player but if he would have loosened up he would have won many more Tournaments. His knowledge was vast, his shot making outstanding. I remember him making 13 tough shots in a row, each shot received a round of applause. Finally he got in line and ran out.

I my mind he was the greatest athlete in individual sports. Scratch Golfer,200+average Bowler,Tennis,Archery,Badmitton you name the sport he would excel at it. Once he Zeroed in on a Sport he would excel in it.####

Rod
09-01-2005, 11:12 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Focus and concentration, can it be anchored with a physical switch without being distracting and eventually eroding your flow???
<hr /></blockquote>

Sid,
I always run my fingers down the shaft to knock off any chalk from the edge of the tip before taking my stance. Once down I always snug up my bridge before the final stroke. I'm sure that comes from using a slip-stroke even though I have backed away some what from that type of stroke. Habbits die hard but I feel its still good to snug up the bridge.

Rod

Sid_Vicious
09-02-2005, 08:08 AM
Hmmm, I tried that at times in the past but forgot until you mentioned it. It seemed to create a more controlled, straight flow in stroke delivery at the time as I remember it. Thanks...sid