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Harold Acosta
09-01-2005, 07:31 PM
World Pool-Billiard Association (WPA) is a non-profit organization. No salaries are paid to its members. Travel expenses are paid to WPA representatives to attend World Sanctioned Events, General Assemblies or to promote the sport.

WPA is composed of Head Federations, Confederations, or Associations from 6 Regions: North America, South America, Asia, Europe, Africa, Oceania. Each head Federation representing several countries and responsible of promoting cue-sports and obtaining sponsorships among their assigned Region. For example, the Panamerican Billiard Confederation (CPB - South America) represents 17 countries from Central America, South America and the Caribbean. There are about 154 Federations around the World representing 3 mayor disciplines: Pool, Carom and Snooker. Each of these Federations also responsible for promoting and obtaining sponsorships for their countries. All Federations must be non-for-profit to comply with International Olympic Committee (IOC) and World Confederation of Billiards Sports (WCBS) requirements.

Visit http://www.wpa-pool.com/index.asp?content=member for the organizational chart.

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<font color="blue"> Here is a brief History of the WPA. Info extracted from the WPA website:

An idea to came about to form a world organisation

After having had European Championships as the highest level of competition for many years, and being aware of the fact that many events were organised in the USA, many of the European players were becoming dissatisfied with the development of the sport in Europe and yearned for competition on a higher level. With knowledge of this, the idea came about to form a world organisation.

The history of Pool has seen many previous attempts to accomplish this, but unfortunately, just as many failures. On occasions the Europeans had been a part of whatever efforts were made, sometimes being an Asian idea, and more often these attempts came from various groups from within the USA The first event that could be truly considered a World Championship was a tournament taking place in Japan in 1976. It was because of that event, the Europeans became aware of the fact that game was also played in many Asian areas and so initial contacts were established. Unfortunately most of these efforts to create a world organisation were just from individuals or national organisations. At a time when communications were still a very slow process, it appeared no one seemed capable of making this idea realise.

At an EPBF (European Pocket Billiard Federation) Board meeting in Germany during November 1987, the idea again re-surfaced. Although everyone knew that this was not going to be an easy task, somehow all agreed that the worst thing that could happen would be another failure. In order to make this attempt possible, all Board members voluntarily donated money of their own to create a logo, proper letterheads and initiate proper communication with various parts of the world. Soon after the work began, letters were sent to all persons and/or organisations that were known.

One of these persons was Kazuo Fujima of Japan. His answer was returned immediately – of course the Asians are interested in founding a world body! Strengthened and encouraged by his reply, an invitation was sent out for the first General Assembly to take place in conjunction with the 1988 European Championships in Stockholm, Sweden. Once again, Mr. Fujima rapidly sent his appreciation for the invitation and announced that he would attend. No response had been received from the USA, therefore it turned out to be a surprise when Mr. Paul Gerni appeared at the meeting willing to represent the USA. As a result of this meeting, a provisional Board consisting of Mr. Kazuo Fujima (Japan), Mr. Paul Gerni, (USA) Mr. Jorgen Sandman (Sweden) and Mr. Horst Vondenhoff (Germany) was created; each one given responsibilities to secure further development.

Inaugural WPA World 9-Ball Championships

During 1989, witnessing again the stagnation of their dreams, Mr. Sandman and Mr. Vondenhoff realised that it was going to be necessary to actually produce a true World Championship in order to substantiate the need for a world-wide network. Mr. Vondenhoff immediately began negotiations with the Town Council of Bergheim, Germany, and eventually they became the generous and gracious host for our inaugural WPA World 9-Ball Championships. By mid-summer invitations were sent, followed by rules, sports regulations and by-laws. As always, the Asians agreed to be part of this event almost immediately. The Americans however, were not so quick to respond. Their hesitation was a combination of lack of knowledge about the development of the sport in Europe and Asia, their security in their own level of play and lack of the necessary funds to become members. Over the following few months, many inquiries were made, but it was not until October when Mr. Michael Kopriwa of Sweden went to the US. There he used his personal recommendations of the individuals involved in the creation of the association to impress upon Mr. Jim Bakula of Brunswick (also BCA President at the time) and Ms. Jacky Moeller of McDermott to solicit some means of participation by the USA. Finally, a Board meeting of the BCA in Chicago early in December voted in favour to pay the fees on behalf of the US Men’s and Women’s professional associations to become involved in this world-wide effort.

An extremely successful result was experienced as 32 men and 16 women players emerged on the small city of Bergheim during March, 1990. The decade of dreams of Sandman and Vondenhoff unfolded with an exquisite opening ceremony in the highest of European tradition. The event, immaculately organised, stretched over four days of gruelling competition and ended with an extravagant banquet celebration, honouring the first true world champions, Robin Bell and Earl Strickland.

The WPA World 9-Ball Championships becomes an annual event

However, while the players were engrossed with their competitions, the dignitaries of the various federations spent countless hours in meetings establishing common grounds on which an intercontinental federation could exist. It was in March 3, 1990 that the first true General Assembly of the World Pool-Billiard Association was held. With representatives from three continents, the WPA was now established as the world organisation for Pool. The following persons were elected to the Board of Directors for an initial three year term: President – Horst Vondenhoff, Vice President and Sports Director – Jorgen Sandman, General Secretary – Shari Stauch (USA), Treasurer – Jacky Moeller (USA), Manager – Kazuo Fujima (Asia), Yung-Hui Tu (Asia) and Joe Kerr (USA). It was decided that the 1991 World Championship would be organised in the United States. It was also decided that the abbreviation of the association would be WPA as opposed to WPBA, to avoid confusion with the Women’s Professional Billiard Association (WPBA) which already existed in the USA. The inaugural WPA President was Horst Vondenhoff of Germany. Mr. Vondenhoff held this position until stepping down to allow Jorgen Sandman of Sweden to take over in 1991. Mr. Sandman continued as President until December 1999, where in Alicante, Spain during our World 9-Ball Championships he announced his resignation. He is succeeded by Tsun-che Chuan of Taipei.

It did not take long before the Asian Pocket Billiard Union (APBU) was formed, to work as an umbrella organisation for the Asian countries. Already in time for the 1991 event, Australia and New Zealand came forward through Ian Anderson with their interest to become involved, and later that same year the Australasian Pool Association was founded and applied for membership.

The WPA World 9-Ball Championships were now established and have since become an annual event, touring the globe for its venue. The 1991 event was held at the Sahara Hotel, Las Vegas. In 1992 it was held at the Sports Centre of the Taipei Sports College where, for the first time, a junior division was initiated.

WPA true global coverage

In 1999 Latin America and Caribe became members and in 2000 Africa joined, finally giving the WPA true global coverage.

Ever since the 1950’s many attempts had been made in order for Billiards to possibly achieve Olympic recognition, but to no avail. Not only did Billiards have difficulties to comply with the definition of Sports that was valid at that point in time, but the International Olympic Committee (IOC) also demanded that there must be only one organisation representing all Billiards Sports. In order to fulfil the IOC’s condition, the three main Billiard divisions (Carom, Pool and Snooker) convened together in August of 1990 at a historic meeting in Bristol, England, where it was decided between them to form the World Confederation of Billiard Sports (WCBS) – an umbrella organisation encompassing all kinds of Billiards. The following eighteen months was spent on developing a set of by-laws enabling the various divisions to work closely together, whilst still maintaining their independence. The inaugural General Assembly of the WCBS was held in Lausanne, Switzerland January 1992. A Board consisting of nine delegates was elected, three representatives from each of the founding members, Union Mondiale de Billard (UMB – Carom), World Pool-Billiard Association (WPA –Pool) and World Snooker Federation (WSF – Snooker), and soon after the work to a possible IOC recognition commenced.

The applications for membership with the General Association of International Sports Federations (GAISF) and for the gaining of recognition of the IOC were submitted in 1992, and in October 1993 the WCBS were, for the first time invited as observers to the GAISF Congress &amp; General Assembly in Lahti, Finland. However, the WCBS application failed to make it to the agenda of the AGM, and therefore the two WCBS representatives at this meeting, Mr. Andre Gagnaux and Mr. Jorgen Sandman were confined to listen and learn. In October of 1994, when the GAISF AGM took place in Monte Carlo, again Mr. Gagnaux and Mr. Sandman were invited as observers, but this time the WCBS application was on the agenda. At the time this point was to be discussed, Mr. Gagnaux and Mr. Sandman were asked to leave the room, a GAISF rule in order to allow discussion between the representatives on member IF’s. After what had seemed an eternity, the two WCBS representatives were invited back to the meeting and were told by the GAISF President, Dr. Un-Young Kim, that the AGM had decided to postpone any decision awaiting “a more defined definition of Sports”.

WCBS applied for recognition by IOC

Meanwhile, the IOC had responded to the application for recognition by stating that the WCBS was too new as an umbrella body for Billiard Sports, and therefore they could expect to be waiting for another few years. The IOC also recommended to the WCBS to apply for membership of the GAISF – “whilst this is not a prerequisite, the IOC would see favourably on a WCBS membership with the GAISF”. In October of 1995, the GAISF Congress and General Assembly were held in Seoul, Korea and again the WCBS were invited as observers. Three WCBS representatives attended, Mr. Nigel Oldfield, Mr. Jorgen Sandman and Mr. Massimino Del Prete. They were busy distributing “Right on Cue”, a brochure which had been developed for the purpose of informing the delegates at the AGM about the WCBS, and also hosted a cocktail party for around 500 attending officials. Whether it was the brochure and/or the cocktail reception that did the job, or if it was due to the IOC altered definition of Sports, we cannot be sure, but as of this AGM, the WCBS had finally become a member of the GAISF.

In July 1996, the IOC decided to grant the WCBS provisional recognition for two years, and in September of the same year the WCBS became a member of the Association of Recognised International Sports Federations (ARISF). An application for membership with the International World Games Association (IWGA) was also filed shortly afterwards. At the 1997 IWGA AGM it was decided that the WCBS would become a member of them as of January 1, 1998. The IWGA organises every four years the World Games, and even though the WCBS would now be a member, this did not automatically warrant participation at these Games. However, as new members of the IWGA, the WCBS did meet with the organising committees for the 2001 Akita World Games, and also submitted its application for participation with the IWGA.

IOC granted a the WCBS its outright recognition

On February 5, 1998, the IOC granted a the WCBS its outright recognition, and by that, it was now clear once and for all, that Billiard Sports were to be treated as one sport among others. Later on in the year the IWGA decided to accept the inclusion of Billiard Sports into the program of the 2001 Akita World Games, and four medals are to be competed for according to the following:

Carom - 16 men to compete in a single elimination format, (3-cushion)
Pool - 16 men &amp; 16 women to compete in separate single elimination formats
Snooker - 16 men to compete in a single elimination format, (Snooker)
The 1999 GAISF AGM decided to accept the WCBS as full members, and by that the WCBS must be deemed to have accomplished a great deal in its seven short years of existence. The WCBS will continue its efforts in order to also one day be accepted for participation in the Olympic Games, a dream now perhaps not that far from reality, but ten years earlier must have seemed an impossibility.

Jean Graus, UMB, President, Exco Member
W. Y. Chin, WSF, General Secretary, Exco Member
Jorgen Sandman, WPA, Treasurer, Exco Member
Yung-Hui Tu, WPA, Vice President
Sindhu Pulsirivong, WSF , Vice President
Wolfgang Rittmann, UMB , PR Manager
Ian Anderson ,WPA , Board Member
Jason Ferguson, WSF , Sports Director
Jean Claude Dupont , UMB , Vice Sports Director

Andre Gagnaux (UMB), who must be credited very much that the WCBS was at all founded, became the first President back in 1992, an office he carried until 1996. He took ill during the second half of 1995, at which time he passed on his immediate tasks to Jorgen Sandman who took over as President in January 1996, just one month before Mr. Gagnaux passed away. Mr. Pulsirivong replaced Mr. Sandman as President in December 1998, and in October 2000 Mr. Graus was elected. The office of President is passed around on a rotating order, so that all three divisions will take their turn at heading the organisation.


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Steve Lipsky
09-02-2005, 07:00 AM
Harold, can you please stop spamming this board with these inane messages? I have responded to two of them with what I think are good rebuttals (as have others), but you haven't replied to either one.

If you want to have a debate, let's have a debate.

You have been a responsible and thoughtful poster for a while now, but you're losing credibility by the day.

- Steve

Harold Acosta
09-02-2005, 10:52 AM
Steve, I am not spamming the boards; I'm trying to educate people like you to better understand what the WPA is about.

Good rebuttals? Hardly my friend. Many of the posts to my threads were gun-slingings, not objective. Many of the people jumped on the subject without "reading" and many others did not or elected not to comprehend the WPA stand; therefore I saw no need to respond.

Debate? What are we going to debate? Your self-proclaimed lack of knowledge of what the WPA or a non-for profit organization is about? No, thanks.

Rich R.
09-02-2005, 11:05 AM
Harold, I assume that your federation is associated with the WPA.

As one of the active leaders of your federation, I believe you have the right, and the responsibility, to look into the financial situation of the WPA. I think it would be very interesting, if you could find out, exactly, how much money they receive every year and, exactly, how much of that money goes to, what can be termed, "Administrative Costs". Assuming all other money would be directed back to the pool comunity, I would say that it would be reasonable for administrative costs to be 5% of the total income, or less. If it is any more than that, their spending is questionable.

I would venture a guess that the administrative cost for the WPA are far and away higher than 5%.

Steve Lipsky
09-02-2005, 11:07 AM
You see no need to respond to American players who feel the WPA couldn't care less about them?

You see no need to respond to many, many players (and I keep talking to more) who could barely care if pool makes it into the Olympics? You take it as a given that people should care about that. Well, news flash, many of us don't. And, Jesus, if you're taking money out of potential prize funds to achieve this goal, somebody else more in tune with player wishes should be making decisions over there.

I skimmed your latest post (I did read the others in entirety), and all I see are foreign names and foreign places.

I ask this in all seriousness, because I really don't know: has the WPA ever held a tournament in the United States? If they have, when and what was the prize pool?

- Steve

Harold Acosta
09-04-2005, 05:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> You see no need to respond to American players who feel the WPA couldn't care less about them?

<font color="blue"> Steve, you seriously cannot be telling me that you alone represent all American Players, and that they all feel the WPA doesn't care about them. There have been several known US Players who have crowned themselves WPA Champions, and they certainly must have believed in the WPA to participate, dont you think? </font color>

You see no need to respond to many, many players (and I keep talking to more) who could barely care if pool makes it into the Olympics? You take it as a given that people should care about that. Well, news flash, many of us don't.

<font color="blue"> What? Are you saying the U.S. Pool Players do not feel like all the other sport players from the U.S. whom feel they have a patriotic duty to represent their country and win a gold medal?

Wouldn't you want to sponsor pool players representing the U.S., at the Olympics?

Wouldn't you feel proud if a US player won the Olympic World Pool Championship?

Couldn't this lead to better endorsements for players as it has been for other Olympic Sports?

What is wrong with you? Again I cannot recognize you as being the sole representative voice of US Players on this issue. </font color>

And, Jesus, if you're taking money out of potential prize funds to achieve this goal, somebody else more in tune with player wishes should be making decisions over there.

<font color="blue"> Money doesn't come out of prize funds. It comes out of the promoter's pocket or sponsorship money that is added. Do you know the difference? </font color>

I skimmed your latest post (I did read the others in entirety), and all I see are foreign names and foreign places.

<font color="blue"> Steve, you need to do some homework. There are several US players that have been Men's WPA Champions (Strickland, Archer, and Nick Varner).

Jeff Carter, Nick Varner, Bobby Hunter, Dallas West, Johnny Archer and Jeremy Jones were WPA runner-ups in 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1998, and 1999.

Several females as Robin Bell (1990 &amp; 1991), Loree Jon Jones (1993), and Ewa Mataya (1994-representing the U.S) were also crowned as WPA Champions.

Loree Jon Jones (1990), Joann Mason (1991), Vivian Villareal (1992 &amp; 1995), and Jeanette Lee (1993 &amp; 1994) were WPA runner-ups .

The first true WPA World Champions were Earl Strickland and Robin Bell. Both repeated the next year. (1990 and 1991).

All all these players foreign or from the U.S.?
</font color>

I ask this in all seriousness, because I really don't know: has the WPA ever held a tournament in the United States?

<font color="blue"> Again, please do some homework. There have been 3 events in the U.S.

1. 1991 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
2. 1994 in Chicago, Illinois.
3. 1997 in Chicago, Illinois. </font color>

If they have, when and what was the prize pool?

<font color="blue"> I owe you the info on that. But I can say that the original World Championships included 32 men and 16 women; therefore, the first prize fund most probably was not significant.

Today's event have 128 men competing for the title. This year's prize fund was $350,000, paid to 64 players. Players DID NOT pay any entry fees.

Now tell me, isn't it nice to collect a first prize of $75,000 without having to pay any entry fees? </font color>
<hr /></blockquote>

Any other questions?

Harold Acosta
09-04-2005, 06:29 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> Harold, I assume that your federation is associated with the WPA.

As one of the active leaders of your federation, I believe you have the right, and the responsibility, to look into the financial situation of the WPA. I think it would be very interesting, if you could find out, exactly, how much money they receive every year and, exactly, how much of that money goes to, what can be termed, "Administrative Costs". Assuming all other money would be directed back to the pool comunity, I would say that it would be reasonable for administrative costs to be 5% of the total income, or less. If it is any more than that, their spending is questionable.

I would venture a guess that the administrative cost for the WPA are far and away higher than 5%. <hr /></blockquote>

Rich, we are in fact associated with the WPA under the South American Region (CPB)...

On your post:

For any non-for-profit organization it is very difficult to have a 5 percent allocation for "adminsitrative costs." It is always more than that because there are so many expenses (like purchase of equipment; computers, faxes, printers, scanner, paper, paper cutter, computer programs, upgrades, floppy disks, CD's, telephone, utilities, airfare, hotel, etc).

In our case, I purchased a computer at about $1,800 several years ago (high prices at the time) and have had it replaced twice at my own expense. I have had to purchase 3 fax machines (better to replace than repair), 2 scanners, 3 laser printers and 2 color printers, 2 laminating machines (for ID Cards and leter/legal size promotional items), countless boxes of paper, paper stock, envelopes, postage stamps, plus the use of my own home phone and cellular. All of these expenses HAVE NOT BEEN charged to our Federation. It comes out of my pocket. I have also paid my own expenses to all billiard events in Puerto Rico and abroad.

It is not easy running a non-for-profit. It could be a start-up nightmare for the founding members. I paid half the dues to the CPB from my own pocket. The other half I collected from interested players at a tournament I attended. I started with about 16 players. Those who help me initially are considered our founding members. But I was decided to form our federation and get the proper recognition; so I ran up my own expenses on behalf of the Puerto Rican Players. (Right after we, the CCB'ers and the Puerto Rican and New York fans and players got Tony Robles to represent Puerto Rico at the 2002 World Pool Championships - Rember that?).

Sponsorship is important but difficult to obtain since so many start-up organizations inquire big companies to assist but many of these companies are already committed to other organizations or events. (I once contacted 50 known organizations - only 7 responded but had prior committments).

So, here you have a brief scenario of what Puerto Rico initially went through. Five (5) percent administrative cost is not sufficient.

The WPA must have had a very similar situation, therefore, right now their administrative costs must be a lot higher than 5 percent. Who knows, maybe 25-50 percent could be likely but then I don't know that for a fact.

Rich R.
09-04-2005, 06:50 PM
Harold, in all honesty, to compare your small upstart federation, with the large international WPA would be unfair to you. The smaller and newer non-profit organizations will never be able to meet the 5% standard and they only survive though the dedication and generosity of people like yourself.

However, the WPA is much larger, with a lot more income, and they should be able to meet the 5% standard, as many non-profit organizations do.

My request to you still stands. Please look into the financial situation of the WPA. As a non-profit organization, this should be public information, but, even if it is not, as the leader of your federation, you should have access to that kind of information.

Steve Lipsky
09-05-2005, 08:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Harold Acosta:</font><hr> <font color="blue"> Steve, you seriously cannot be telling me that you alone represent all American Players, and that they all feel the WPA doesn't care about them. There have been several known US Players who have crowned themselves WPA Champions, and they certainly must have believed in the WPA to participate, dont you think? </font color>

Harold, I mentioned in my post that I have spoken to other players about this. If you are asking if the few American champions or runner-ups are happy that the WPA held a tournament that they did well in, I will grant you that they will probably say yes. When I do well in a tournament, I am also usually happy that the tournament was held, lol.

<font color="blue"> What? Are you saying the U.S. Pool Players do not feel like all the other sport players from the U.S. whom feel they have a patriotic duty to represent their country and win a gold medal?

Wouldn't you want to sponsor pool players representing the U.S., at the Olympics?

Wouldn't you feel proud if a US player won the Olympic World Pool Championship?

Couldn't this lead to better endorsements for players as it has been for other Olympic Sports?

What is wrong with you? Again I cannot recognize you as being the sole representative voice of US Players on this issue. </font color>

Pool in the Olympics would be fine, as long as no significant money is coming out of prize funds in any way to support this goal. I do not believe that sponsors will be lining up if we get pool into the Olympics. It is possible that the Gold medalist might get some deal, but that is just one player. </font color>

<font color="blue"> Money doesn't come out of prize funds. It comes out of the promoter's pocket or sponsorship money that is added. Do you know the difference? </font color>

<font color="”green”"> In two sentences, you managed to completely contradict yourself, lol. You are saying that removing money from the sponsorship added funds (to lobby for Olympic participation) is NOT taking money out of the prize fund??? Can you explain this, please? Where would the money go if it were NOT being used to lobby for pool in the Olympics? </font color>

<font color="blue"> Again, please do some homework. There have been 3 events in the U.S.

1. 1991 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
2. 1994 in Chicago, Illinois.
3. 1997 in Chicago, Illinois. </font color>

<font color="”green”"> Harold, I know the WPA is important to you, but please look at this objectively. There have been THREE events in the United States over 16 years (and NONE in the last eight years), and this is why American players should feel the WPA cares about them? </font color>

<hr /></blockquote>

Alfie
09-05-2005, 08:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> Harold, I know the WPA is important to you, but please look at this objectively. There have been THREE events in the United States over 16 years (and NONE in the last eight years), and this is why American players should feel the WPA cares about them? <hr /></blockquote>You must look at the BCA as the local arm of the WPA, FWIW.

IMO

Steve Lipsky
09-05-2005, 09:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> You must look at the BCA as the local arm of the WPA, FWIW.

IMO <hr /></blockquote>

Wait a minute... is that true? This I did not know. That changes things for me a bit, although even the BCA doesn't hold too many professional tournaments (and their prize funds are fairly anemic).

Still, thanks Alfie.

- Steve

Rich R.
09-05-2005, 10:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> You must look at the BCA as the local arm of the WPA, FWIW.<hr /></blockquote>

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> Wait a minute... is that true? This I did not know. That changes things for me a bit, although even the BCA doesn't hold too many professional tournaments (and their prize funds are fairly anemic).
<hr /></blockquote>
The BCA is listed as a member of the WPA.
http://www.wpa-pool.com/index.asp?content=member

Does the BCA hold any pro tournaments, other than the one men's and one women's tournement in Vegas, each year?

IMHO, the BCA is just another, of many, so called "non-profit" organizations, that should be subject to better scrutiny. There is a lot of money going into the BCA and I see very little coming back to the players. I only wish that someone could correct me and tell me where all of the money is going, from this "non-profit" organization.

DialUp
09-05-2005, 10:35 AM
Non Profit is just a tax filing, for the most part. It does not mean the org is going to do good things becuase of their not for profit status. Look at the Red Cross and Goodwill, for example. Look at the salary of the head of Goodwill and tell me they run a charity or a profit business.

In fact, a non profit can be a real cash cow. I worked for one for 6 years and believe me when I tell you we were a PROFIT company. We were allowed to pay industry standard for all positions. The head was eligible to pay himself 1 million a year. He took about 60k because thats all that was left.

When we suffered a very large embezzlement, the IRS would not even investigate us or revoke our non profit status. Nobody cared that the directors (all realted by blood) were running a profit company...

theinel
09-06-2005, 12:44 AM
Steve,

I feel your side of all this. I have also asked a lot of people in the US about pool organizations and very, very few even know of the WPA's existence (zero had heard of the WCBS). Olympic recognition rarely gets more than a shrug which roughly translates to something like "pool is pool, what does it have to do with the Olympics". Many US players know of the BCA but the vast majority could not tell who or what they are other than that they have a league and a tournament in Vegas (neither of which are true any longer) yet the BCA is still the sanctioned North American body of the WPA which I have been told is under review as they no longer represent any players which is a WPA requirement.

------

Harold,

Thanks for all of your hard work supporting pool in general especially in PR. I am aware of the tough and often thankless and selfless work that goes into non-profits but that is part of the job. You have a somewhat unique opportunity in PR which isn't available in the majority of the US, which is that you can direct or inspire a relatively small population. The US has a large population and a very short attention span usually limited to team sport playoffs and individual sport "majors", pool barely rates. I know that this is a marketing issue not related to our sport directly but it is the truth we face here. The only pool exposure we get is the WPBA (Women's tour, because they produce their own events and ESPN(2) airs them at little or no cost to them (ESPN(2)) and trick shot competitions which invariably have the same 4 or 5 talented participants and while interesting certainly don't compel. I hear of the World Pool Championships but I don't usually get to see them and if I do it was not an easy accomplishment.

I've rambled on here but my point is that you guys shouldn't be sparring you should be collaborating. Pool in the US is grass roots popular but the players are starving. Organization is important but shouldn't be a burden. The IPT is suspect and hasn't signed up with any recognized organization but they haven't even had their first open event yet. If the best course of action the WPA can come up with is open letters seemingly fearful of the money the IPT says they bring then maybe their time has passed along with the all the acronyms that have gone before them. If they do provide a real value then I'm sure they will find a role to play.

Best of luck.

Dagwood
09-06-2005, 05:48 AM
tap tap tap!

Rich R.
09-06-2005, 06:35 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote theinel:</font><hr> The only pool exposure we get is the WPBA (Women's tour, because they produce their own events and ESPN(2) airs them at little or no cost to them (ESPN(2)) <hr /></blockquote> Actually, I believe the WPBA pays a fee for ESPN to air those events. It is a money maker for ESPN, not the WPBA.

Harold Acosta
09-06-2005, 09:49 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> You must look at the BCA as the local arm of the WPA, FWIW.

IMO <hr /></blockquote>

Wait a minute... is that true? This I did not know. That changes things for me a bit, although even the BCA doesn't hold too many professional tournaments (and their prize funds are fairly anemic).

Still, thanks Alfie.

- Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Steve, I somehow mentioned this at the start of this thread; however, I gave our example instead of also providing the info about the U.S.

This was part of my post:

<font color="blue"> WPA is composed of Head Federations, Confederations, or Associations from 6 Regions: North America, South America, Asia, Europe, Africa, Oceania. Each head Federation representing several countries and responsible of promoting cue-sports and obtaining sponsorships among their assigned Region.</font color>

The BCA is the representative of the WPA in North America. Canada is also included in North America. They (BCA) are now considered a "trade organization" instead of a non-for-profit. With all possibility, this may be discussed at the next General Assembly.

The BCA holds 2 yearly Championships sanctioned by the WPA; Mens and Women's BCA 9 Ball Championships. Players from each of the six WPA Regions are invited. Alan Rolon (CPB Champion) was invited but couldn't make it this year.

Puerto Rico as member of the CPB/WPA and having the reigning Panamerican Champion was invited to the 2005 Kaohsiung World Pool Championships, the 2005 BCA Championships, and the 2005 International Challenge of Champions.

Since our inclusion to the WPA, we have been at the 2003 and 2004 World Pool Championships. Puerto Rico (Alan Rolon) has participated in 3 Panamerican Championships; placing 3rd in the first and winning the last 2 Panamerican Championships. We also have 2 Gran Prix Championships (Robby Saez in Venezuela and Frankie Hernandez in Puerto Rico). All this since June 2003.

Tony Robles participated in the 2002 World Pool Championships representing Puerto Rico. That was a joint effort by New York fans and players, Puerto Rico fans and players, and the CCB'ers of this board; when a wildcard was afforded. This gesture from everyone, prompted me to form the Puerto Rico Federation in order to participate in subsequent World Events.

Prior to the year 2002, I did not know about the CPB/WPA, WCBS, UMB, ISBF, etc. It took me about a year to organize all paperwork but by 2003, we made it to the World Championships in Cardiff without having to ask for a wild-card. We earned it.

If it were not for our WPA membership, Puerto Rico would have never been invited or had participated in any of these events; thus, this being a very strong reason why I support and will continue to support the WPA.

I hope this info will somehow let you know how I feel about supporting the WPA. U.S players may not feel that the WPA has done anything for them, but then the US Players have to take appropriate action, just like I did for Puerto Rico.

Barry Behrman decided to obtain sanctioning for this year's US Open. He must of somehow believed in what the WPA stands for.

My question continues to be: What reasons the IPT has for not doing the same?

Warm regards.....


Harold Acosta - President
Puerto Rican Billiard Federation

Harold Acosta
09-06-2005, 09:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Alfie:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Steve Lipsky:</font><hr> Harold, I know the WPA is important to you, but please look at this objectively. There have been THREE events in the United States over 16 years (and NONE in the last eight years), and this is why American players should feel the WPA cares about them?

<hr /></blockquote>You must look at the BCA as the local arm of the WPA, FWIW.

IMO <hr /></blockquote>

Thank you Alfie....

Harold Acosta
09-06-2005, 10:15 PM
theinel:

Thanks for this post, it was objective and you do have a point; we should be collaborating on this issue.

There are several things that have to be "fixed" in the U.S. The BCA issue is one of them; the other the IPT. Their is also another organization in the U.S. that we should be looking at. That organization is the American CueSports Alliance; formed right after the BCA split.

This means that once in a while we should all visit the WPA, the BCA, the IPT, the ACS websites, and WCBS websites. This is where we would be able to find out what is going on with "pool" in the U.S., and around the World.

Maybe each of us should subscribe to newsletters from all the websites. It doen't hurt to have a couple of more emails in our in-boxes; specially about what we care for.

I hope that at the end, everything works well....