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SnakebyteXX
09-02-2005, 05:33 AM
The president stumbles in his initial handling of Katrina's aftermath. But he has a history of righting himself

By MATTHEW COOPER/WASHINGTON

Posted Thursday, Sep. 01, 2005
It was the end of summer and Bush's poll numbers had been in decline. Congress was ornery about the president's stalled legislative agenda. And cable TV was consumed with the disappearance of a beautiful girl far from home. Such was the situation on September 10, 2001 and the same could be said of Tuesday this week. Substitute Natalee Holloway, the missing American girl in Aruba, for Chandra Levy, the murdered congressional aide, and the parallels are kind of eerie.

The other parallel is Bush's awkward first hours of handling a crisis. September 11, 2001 is remembered as Bush's finest hour but of course the day was anything but. He sat frozen in a Florida school after being informed of the attack, flew around the country, at first sending Karen Hughes to reassure a worried nation before he made a statement from an Air Force base while a macho Donald Rumsfeld helped carry stretchers out of a burning Pentagon. By the time Bush got back to the Oval Office that night to address the nation, his response had paled compared to that of Rudolph Giuliani. But Bush began to turn things around quickly, the next morning promising all-but-unlimited assistance to rebuild and culminating in his famed bullhorn remarks to rescue workers at Ground Zero on September 14.

This time, Bush has been just as flatfooted. He couldn't seem to break off his schedule in San Diego, where he was commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Allied victory over Japan, while New Orleans filled like a bathtub. His remarks to the country from the Rose Garden yesterday about the Katrina disaster seemed oddly terse; his litany of aid meaningless without context. Sending five million military MRE meals sounded impressive until you realized there may be a million American refugees at this point. Does that mean we're only handing out five meals per person? And his interview with Diane Sawyer of ABC News seemed weirdly out of touch. His smirk came back; he stumbled into jargon like SPRo, the nickname for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and said things that seemed patently out of touch, including the now-infamous remark that no one could have foreseen the levee breaking. His inability to see any moral distinction between those who steal water and those who loot TV sets seemed odd—and at odds with local politicians like New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin and Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu. Then where was the call for sacrifice? While southern governors like Georgia Republican Sonny Perdue worried publicly about gas shortfalls as soon as this weekend and begged for conservation, Bush seemed to do so only as an afterthought.

But Bush has shown a tremendous capacity to right himself. Just as he blew his initial response to the Indian Ocean tsunami with smalltime aid and a comment from a lower level aide, and then came back strong by appointing his father and former President Bill Clinton to encourage Americans to donate to charity, he's done the same this time, even reenlisting the former presidents. Clinton especially gives him insulation. How can Democrats attack when Bill Clinton is at his side? They will anyway, but it'll be harder.

The Battle of New Orleans may yet be a cataclysmic event that scuttles Bush's political agenda. One can imagine how the reconstruction of an American city will but unbearable pressure on him to pull out of Iraq or abandon his partial privatization of Social Security. And it may yet emerge that the federal response to Katrina was even worse than it seemed, making the questions about pre-9/11 intelligence pale by comparison. Democrats harbor such fantasies. But Bush's career is all about people underestimating him and it would be a mistake to do so this time.


web page (http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1100564,00.html)

Sid_Vicious
09-02-2005, 07:41 AM
"But Bush's career is all about people underestimating him and it would be a mistake to do so this time."

I don't underestimate him. He has been lapse in two extreme cases which has killed Americans due to his stammering of action. It's funny that he put it in gear when he flew the bin Laden family out of this country during the grounding period of the whole US airspace. Does this expediency fit the scenario when combined with the towers and now this disaster in New Orleans? I am embarrassed to say he is the USA's leader....sid

Gayle in MD
09-02-2005, 08:31 AM
For atleast two to three days, we knew that Katrina was heading straight toward those extremely vulnerable areas, and while Bush continues to be a disgracefully uncaring, inept President, I also think that the Governor, and the Mayor failed the people of Louisiana as well. After all, they may be out there now, pointing fingers and screaming for help, but they should have been prepared to get those poor people out of there in time to avoid this disasterous result. They had to have known that people living in those areas were too poor to get out of town in time. And they certainly knew how much risk was involved. The victims were let down not only by the federal government, and the president, but also by their own local elected officials, IMO. Plans should have been made far in advance for the massive transport of the poor residents in that area long ago.

Gayle in Md.

Sid_Vicious
09-02-2005, 08:46 AM
Gayle,

Did you by any chance see CNN just now with Bush's conflab with the governors there on the ground? It was a political stage for all of them, while the real thing those people needed there was leadership, not the routine the pres and govs presented trading compliments. This ugly government's handling seems to never end. GW had ample information sources in Washington, he didn't need this PR disguised as a situation update, he needs to get to work in the trenches. Sickening. Also, CNN reported that a federal convoy of food and water was 30 minutes from the convention center. Coincidence that Bush happened to be on the ground right at that moment? You can fool some of the people all of the time...you know the rest. This guy is so easy to read...sid

Qtec
09-02-2005, 10:10 PM
The last week the TV coverage has shown people shouting for help on rooftops, looting in the city and the 1000,s who have been staying in the Astronome/football stadium. I cant be the only one who has noticed that they are 99% black. Its really a case of 'spot the white man'!
GW comes to town and seems to land at the spot where all the whites have congregated! Then comes the photo-op- GW hugs two black girls! I nearly puked!
Now we are getting the GOP propoganda, [trying to take the heat off GW] with their,"its their own fault. The land is too low and they should have left town like they were told".
On CNN they said 27% of the Pop in L is on or below the poverty line! How can you leave town if you dont have transport or money to pay for a motel?
I guess they never thought of that either.

When they knew the storm was coming and they expected flooding, they could have filled 2 navy ships to the brim with supplies, just in case. They could have been there within 24 hrs.
In Iraq they had a stampeed that killed 800. The Pres of Iraq called for 3 days of national mournig. In the US, the day after 1000,s are killed the Pres goes to a funraiser. Condi goes to the theater. Cheney is nowhere to be seen and neither is Rumy.
I bet there would have been a different reaction if this had happened in Hew H.

Q

Qtec
09-02-2005, 10:22 PM
Was Post.

[ QUOTE ]
While both parties rallied behind Bush's request for $10.5 billion for initial emergency aid, enabling him to sign it last night, lawmakers and other politicians lambasted the administration. Democrats accused Bush of a failure of leadership at a desperate moment. Republicans focused their fire on Bush's government, rather than the president, but were at times scathing.

Bush, who almost never publicly acknowledges mistakes, paid deference to the rage yesterday with a rare concession that his administration's efforts fell short in the opening days of the crisis. "The results are not acceptable," he told reporters on the South Lawn before leaving the White House for his tour of afflicted areas. He added: "We'll get on top of this situation, and we're going to help people that need help."

At his first stop in Mobile, Ala., he repeated the promise. "If it's not going exactly right, we're going to make it go exactly right," Bush vowed. "If there's problems, we're going to address the problems. And that's what I've come down to assure people of."

By the time he reached Biloxi, Miss., though, he tried to refashion his "not acceptable" judgment. He said his earlier comments were "not denigrating the efforts of anybody," and added: "I am satisfied with the response. I'm not satisfied with all the results." During a separate trip to Lafayette, La., however, Laura Bush drew no such distinction. "This response is not an adequate response," she said.

The president appeared stunned by what he saw on the ground. He choked up and had difficulty talking at first after listening to a briefing by Govs. Haley Barbour (R) of Mississippi and Bob Riley (R) of Alabama. His motorcade had to dodge fallen trees when later driving around Biloxi. When Bush got out of the limousine, he came across two distraught sisters who had nothing but the clothes they were wearing.

He gathered them both into his arms, kissed them on their heads and walked with them for a while. "Hang in there," he told them.

But the problems with the response were evident. When the women said they needed clothes, Bush directed them to a nearby Salvation Army center. A man corrected the president: "It's wiped out," he said.

<hr /></blockquote>

Q

dg-in-centralpa
09-03-2005, 01:35 PM
Is it the government's fault these people are poor? Why don't they get off their ass and get a job. Where I live, we have poor people and lots of jobs. Not all high paying, but jobs nonetheless. Enough to have a modest apartment and live above poverty, not enough to get rich but able to survive. Get them off welfare. There have been poor people for thousands of years and for thousands to come. Give me a break. Is the government responsible for an escape plan for N.O. in case of a hurricane? Who then gives the word to evacuate? People on their own decided to ride it out since the last several times they were told to board up and get out, nothing much happened.

DG

Drop1
09-03-2005, 05:10 PM
So,what you are saying is we should send the niggers to where you live. Makes since to me.

dg-in-centralpa
09-03-2005, 09:11 PM
From Mrs. D.G.
I find more reason to grieve and help get something done than to point fingers at this point. I heartily agree that it is appaling that our country that has reponded so well to other crisis has been so slow and unorganized to send help to our own.
But there are events that happen that are so overwhelming we cannot help and save everyone. The crew of the space shuttle Challenger has no possible means of escape at that critical point of the flight. The events of 911 were horrible, but what act of God could possibly have saved those on the top floors and those trapped below. A certain number of losses could not be prevented. I think it was lucky that those towers colapsed straight down (although I do believe achitecture may have helped design it that way.)
New Orleans was a disaster waiting to happen. There was no possible way to have evaucuated everyone, expecially those who choose not to leave. In a disaster, a certian amount of casualties will happen. When the big one shakes up California, we won't be able to save everyone although I know we will try.
I grieve for the loss of life, property and the historic city of New Orleans. And I am frustrated and angry at the slowness of our relief efforts. But our energy should now go towards what we can do to help those who have lost everything and not pointing the finger at whose fault this was. Mother Nature will have her way.

Mrs. DG
whose opinion does not reflect that of the Mr. DG - it's a cold night in our home.

Qtec
09-03-2005, 09:36 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Is it the government's fault these people are poor? <hr /></blockquote>
No. I,m not saying its anybodys fault that people are poor DG. Its just a fact. A fact I think that was overlooked.
What assistence was offered to those who wanted to leave but couldnt? I dont know.
I think it was the Mayor who mentioned the drug problem in NO.
eg, If you have a junkie living on the next floor and you evacuate, you had better take everything with you because if you dont, you will return to an empty house! That thought might have been an incentive for people, who live in bad areas, to stay. Its possible.
Q........keeps waiting for some journalist to ask someone the Q, "why did you stay?"

Qtec
09-03-2005, 10:00 PM
web page (http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/article310195.ece)

Voodoo Daddy
09-04-2005, 04:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> So,what you are saying is we should send the niggers to where you live. Makes since to me. <hr /></blockquote>

Are you really that much or a racist prick? How do you sleep at night? Oh its spelled "sense" not "since" just so you can say you learned something today.

Drop1
09-04-2005, 12:08 PM
Thanks for the spelling lesson. Yes I use the word nigger,because it enrages people,and thats what has to be done in this Country. This is a racist Country that has never given represntation to people of any color. The whole civil rights movement is dead. The idea that color makes the person will always exist,but if you examine what has been done by the laws, that have been passed,you will find them to be demeaning,and cosmetic in terms of developing a real structure that does more than offer hope,and then reverts back to the institutional racism that exists at all levels of our society,in business,government,and education. Maybe you can't see,that everytime I say nigger,spic,gook,or any other word that dinegrates people of another color,it is because I refuse to be part of a system that continues to give a hand out,and not a hand. I left out the press in my list of biggots. You see,I go back to a time when Attorney General Robert Kennedy gave the go ahead to wire tap Martin Luther King,and to a time when The House UnAmerican Activities commitee violated the rights of hundreds of people. Calling people Black is just a balm to heal the conscience of a White suppresive Government.I will continue to use the word Nigger,because I will not be part of the White Band Aid.

nhp
09-05-2005, 02:07 AM
Would you say that to a black person's face? And what race are you?

Voodoo Daddy
09-05-2005, 04:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> Maybe you can't see,that everytime I say nigger,spic,gook,or any other word that dinegrates people of another color,it is because I refuse to be part of a system that continues to give a hand out,and not a hand.

Like it or not your no better than the Archie Bunker's of the world, man of color or not. When I moved to Miami in '72 there was still white and black water fountains. I grew up in a well mixed area, went to school with a rainbow of cultures...my oldest and dearest friend on this planet is a black man. I have such a difficulty understanding your mentality but to each his own


Calling people Black is just a balm to heal the conscience of a White suppresive Government.I will continue to use the word Nigger,because I will not be part of the White Band Aid.


I live by this code...A**HOLE has no color or ethnic background, you are or your not. Using slang words only shows inner anger and maybe you should look in the mirror for that very anger first before belching it out to the rest of us. Frankly, it makes me sick. <hr /></blockquote>

SnakebyteXX
09-05-2005, 05:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> Thanks for the spelling lesson. Yes I use the word nigger,because it enrages people,and thats what has to be done in this Country. This is a racist Country that has never given represntation to people of any color. The whole civil rights movement is dead. The idea that color makes the person will always exist,but if you examine what has been done by the laws, that have been passed,you will find them to be demeaning,and cosmetic in terms of developing a real structure that does more than offer hope,and then reverts back to the institutional racism that exists at all levels of our society,in business,government,and education. Maybe you can't see,that everytime I say nigger,spic,gook,or any other word that dinegrates people of another color,it is because I refuse to be part of a system that continues to give a hand out,and not a hand. I left out the press in my list of biggots. You see,I go back to a time when Attorney General Robert Kennedy gave the go ahead to wire tap Martin Luther King,and to a time when The House UnAmerican Activities commitee violated the rights of hundreds of people. Calling people Black is just a balm to heal the conscience of a White suppresive Government.I will continue to use the word Nigger,because I will not be part of the White Band Aid. <hr /></blockquote>

http://img381.imageshack.us/img381/88/smellslikebullshit5sx.jpg

Drop1
09-05-2005, 02:05 PM
Good question,I don't have an answer other than depends on the scenario. Its funny,that when I was growing up in San Diego,my best friend was black,and I spoke out against red lining,in the late fifties, my wife is Mexican,and my Son had a Black girl friend. I have worked for Blacks,and I have had Blacks work for me. I have never considered the color of my face,but it is white.

Drop1
09-05-2005, 02:25 PM
I don't care how it smells to you. Blacks are no better off today than they were forty years ago. Do you think things are just hunky dory the way they are? You tell me what Blacks want..and try not to make it smell like B.S.

nhp
09-05-2005, 02:48 PM
Black people don't like any race, especially white people to use that term, they all find it offensive. That's why I'm asking you if you say it to them in person or not. Most non-black people who use that term use it in private or in anonymity because they know that saying it to their face can result in the crap being kicked out of them. I live in Los Angeles too, in some areas out here they would shoot you. I have a couple black friends and I have a great deal of respect for them and their race, and out of respect I never use that word, and would never have a reason to use it.

Drop1
09-05-2005, 04:02 PM
Most White people will say they have Black friends, they like,and respect. You can get killed in any large city for saying Nigger. So people say it under cover. I had a Chinese friend ask me why are White people so prejudice.I could only reply that it is part of the culture and heritage in which we grew up. In the late sixties,when my wife and I were looking for an appartment in Covina, the land lady told me she didn't rent to Mexicans. I told her I was White,and she said your wife is Mexican. Later I told my wife what the woman had said. My wife did not react with anger,but said we would have to look some place else. I could not believe how resigned she was to accept the words of the women,and not fight. Today I think she was right. A side line ....the first person killed by the English in The Revolutionary War, was a Black man named Gray. He was the second person shot at the Boston Tea Party,but the first to die.

nhp
09-05-2005, 09:57 PM
Do you care if you saying that word offends or hurts someone? And are you a racist?

eg8r
09-06-2005, 05:21 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I grieve for the loss of life, property and the historic city of New Orleans. And I am frustrated and angry at the slowness of our relief efforts. But our energy should now go towards what we can do to help those who have lost everything and not pointing the finger at whose fault this was. Mother Nature will have her way.
<hr /></blockquote> I completely agree. Right now is the time to help those in need.

eg8r

eg8r
09-06-2005, 05:23 AM
[ QUOTE ]
The last week the TV coverage has shown people shouting for help on rooftops, looting in the city and the 1000,s who have been staying in the Astronome/football stadium. I cant be the only one who has noticed that they are 99% black. Its really a case of 'spot the white man'!
GW comes to town and seems to land at the spot where all the whites have congregated! Then comes the photo-op- GW hugs two black girls! I nearly puked! <hr /></blockquote> What, now you are a race whore. Do you good buddy Jesse proud.

eg8r

eg8r
09-06-2005, 05:27 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Give me a break. Is the government responsible for an escape plan for N.O. in case of a hurricane? Who then gives the word to evacuate? People on their own decided to ride it out since the last several times they were told to board up and get out, nothing much happened.
<hr /></blockquote> No kidding. These guys are looking and panting every day to find a way to start arguments about this stuff.

eg8r

eg8r
09-06-2005, 05:29 AM
[ QUOTE ]
So,what you are saying is we should send the -------- to where you live. Makes since to me. <hr /></blockquote> Totally uncalled for.

eg8r

Drop1
09-06-2005, 08:20 AM
Of course I care,and no I'm not a racist. I need to look at the last forty years of my life,and see if I'm the one out of step with the events of today. Because I'm not a racist,I can do this. I don't want the skin color of any person to exclude them from fullfilling their potential. There is a great need for Minority participation at all levels of society. Unfortunatly that is not happening. My son went to college because of Minority programs that were in place. Now those programs have been scratched. Some where the Dream has been lost. Who are the Minority leaders of today? I see America on the path to becoming an eletist third world Country of rich people,and poor people,with an ever narrowing middle class. The poor are going to be the uneducated,the elderly,and the minorities. If my view is wrong tell me.

Qtec
09-06-2005, 10:39 AM
I,m only stating the OBVIOUS! If you would read other news than FOX you would know that this is not only MY opinion, its the whole WORLD'S opinion ,including the USA press. Anyone with two eyes can confirm this.
One thing is for sure, it certainly puts the 'terrorist threat'into perspective.

Qtec

eg8r
09-06-2005, 12:50 PM
I have not been to Fox news in a few months. You are race baiting. Just because everyone is jumping off a bridge to their death does not mean you need to do it also. Leave that crap to your buddy Jesse.

eg8r

Qtec
09-07-2005, 05:07 AM
The real shame.

Op-Ed NY Times

[ QUOTE ]
But Hurricane Katrina also underscores a much larger problem: the growing number of Americans trapped in a never-ending cyclone of poverty. And while it may be too early to apportion blame definitively for the mishandling of the hurricane, even President Bush's own administration acknowledges that America's poverty is worsening on his watch.

The U.S. Census Bureau reported a few days ago that the poverty rate rose again last year, with 1.1 million more Americans living in poverty in 2004 than a year earlier. After declining sharply under Bill Clinton, the number of poor people has now risen 17 percent under Mr. Bush.

If it's shameful that we have bloated corpses on New Orleans streets, it's even more disgraceful that the infant mortality rate in America's capital is twice as high as in China's capital. That's right - the number of babies who died before their first birthdays amounted to 11.5 per thousand live births in 2002 in Washington, compared with 4.6 in Beijing.

Indeed, according to the United Nations Development Program, an African-American baby in Washington has less chance of surviving its first year than a baby born in urban parts of the state of Kerala in India.

Under Mr. Bush, the national infant mortality rate has risen for the first time since 1958. The U.S. ranks 43rd in the world in infant mortality, according to the C.I.A.'s World Factbook; if we could reach the level of Singapore, ranked No. 1, we would save 18,900 children's lives each year.

So in some ways the poor children evacuated from New Orleans are the lucky ones because they may now get checkups and vaccinations. Nationally, 29 percent of children had no health insurance at some point in the last 12 months, and many get neither checkups nor vaccinations On immunizations, the U.S. ranks 84th for measles and 89th for polio..

One of the most dispiriting elements of the catastrophe in New Orleans was the looting. I covered the 1995 earthquake that leveled much of Kobe, Japan, killing 5,500, and for days I searched there for any sign of criminal behavior. Finally I found a resident who had seen three men steal food. I asked him whether he was embarrassed that Japanese would engage in such thuggery.

"No, you misunderstand," he said firmly. "These looters weren't Japanese. They were foreigners."

The reasons for this are complex and partly cultural, but one reason is that Japan has tried hard to stitch all Japanese together into the nation's social fabric. In contrast, the U.S. - particularly under the Bush administration - has systematically cut people out of the social fabric by redistributing wealth from the most vulnerable Americans to the most affluent.

It's not just that funds may have gone to Iraq rather than to the levees in New Orleans; it's also that money went to tax cuts for the wealthiest rather than vaccinations for children.

<hr /></blockquote>

Its all about priorities. GW,s priority is giving the wealthy more money.

Q

eg8r
09-07-2005, 05:41 AM
Thanks for dropping the race baiting. However true to form, you have nothing else so how about a little class warfare. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r

Qtec
09-07-2005, 10:04 AM
how bout we discus priorities? Chicken?

eg, "why has billions of $ been spent on IMAGINARY threats and so little on real, KNOW threats?"

Q /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

hondo
09-07-2005, 10:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> I don't care how it smells to you. Blacks are no better off today than they were forty years ago.

Uh.... Yeah, they are. At least in West Virginia. I hear
some of what you're saying but your delivery leaves
a little to be desired. If I was a black man and I
had just fallen and you came along and said let me
help you up, nigger; I'd get up &amp; smack you right
across your honky face.

eg8r
09-07-2005, 10:26 AM
Q, if you want to discuss something other than the topic go start another thread. If the thread is worth discussing, then I am sure you will get some responses.

eg8r

hondo
09-07-2005, 10:27 AM
C'mon,Eg, surely you know what he's saying here.
There's a guy on AZ called ugotda7. I think you
guys were joined at the hip and separated at birth.

eg8r
09-07-2005, 10:30 AM
[ QUOTE ]
There's a guy on AZ called ugotda7. I think you
guys were joined at the hip and separated at birth. <hr /></blockquote> LOL, a brother I never knew about? I might have to go to Az to see what he is all about.

eg8r

eg8r
09-07-2005, 10:31 AM
[ QUOTE ]
C'mon,Eg, surely you know what he's saying here.
<hr /></blockquote> Yes I do know what he is saying, and it is no better than that scum Jesse Jackson.

eg8r

hondo
09-07-2005, 11:42 AM
Trust me, two peas in a pod. i was sure it was you but
he says he just lurks on CCB.


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
There's a guy on AZ called ugotda7. I think you
guys were joined at the hip and separated at birth. <hr /></blockquote> LOL, a brother I never knew about? I might have to go to Az to see what he is all about.

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>

eg8r
09-08-2005, 04:35 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Trust me, two peas in a pod. i was sure it was you but
he says he just lurks on CCB. <hr /></blockquote> LOL, I can promise you it is not me over there. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

eg8r

Qtec
09-08-2005, 06:41 AM
[ QUOTE ]
September 8, 2005
No Strangers to the Blues
By BOB HERBERT
The tragedy in New Orleans did not occur in a vacuum. There is no way, even in the face of a storm as violent as Katrina, that a great American city should have been reduced to little more than a sewage pit overnight.

The monumental failure of the federal government to respond immediately and effectively to the catastrophe that resulted from Hurricane Katrina was preceded by many years in which the people of New Orleans (especially its poorest residents) were shamefully neglected by all levels of government.

New Orleans was not a disaster waiting to happen when the screaming winds of Katrina slammed the city with the force of an enemy attack. The disaster was already under way long before Katrina ever existed. The flood that followed the storm, and the Bush administration's ineptitude following the flood, were the blows that sent an already weakened city down for the count.

The public school system, for example, is one of the worst in the nation. Forget about educating the children, 96 percent of them black. School officials, enveloped in a bureaucratic fog and the toxic smoke of corruption, do not even know how many people are employed by the system. The budget is a joke. Money had to be borrowed to pay teachers.

The classroom environment has been chaotic. About 10,000 of the 60,000 students were suspended last year, and nearly 1,000 were expelled. Half of the high school kids fail to graduate in four years. To get a sense of the system's priorities, consider the following from a Times-Picayune editorial last fall:

"When it was still unclear which way Hurricane Ivan would go, school system employees on school system time driving school system vehicles using school system materials were sent to board up the superintendent's house."

That superintendent left (and not a moment too soon), but the abject neglect of the young remained. Long before the hurricane, the children of New Orleans had been failed by the adults responsible for them, starting in many cases with their parents and going right on up through their teachers, city officials, state officials and a national administration that sees the kids mostly as objects - totems - to be hugged during campaign photo-ops.

Crime in New Orleans is another issue that has gotten a lot of attention in Katrina's aftermath. It should have gotten more attention before the hurricane hit. A great deal of the mayhem reported or rumored to have occurred over the past several days appears to have been exaggerated. But New Orleans has long had a serious crime problem. And it has never been properly dealt with.

A couple of days ago I was talking with a woman named Julia Cass who had fled the flood and settled temporarily in Montgomery, Ala. It turns out that Ms. Cass, a former reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer, had just completed a paper for the Children's Defense Fund, which is concerned about the effect on children of the chronic violence plaguing New Orleans.

Ms. Cass noted that as of Aug. 19, there had been 192 murders in the city, an increase of 7 percent over that period last year. (You can get a decent perspective on the violence if you note that New Orleans, with a population of 500,000, had 264 homicides last year, compared with the 572 homicides in New York, which has a population of 8 million.)

Ms. Cass wrote that in homicide cases in New Orleans, witnesses frequently refuse to come forward, or do not show up at trials. "The general explanation is that they are afraid," she said, "and with good reason, since the perpetrators too often are not arrested or get out on bail or are never prosecuted or are not convicted. A person who murders another in New Orleans has less than a one in four chance of being convicted."

New Orleans had has high rates of illiteracy and high rates of poverty, and long before the hurricane blew in, high rates of children and families with extraordinarily low expectations. In short, much of the city was a mess, and no one was marshaling the considerable resources necessary to help pull its stricken residents out of the trouble of their daily lives.

Those were the residents who, for the most part, were left behind to suffer and die when the people of means began sprinting toward higher ground. They are the ones who are always left behind, out of sight and out of mind, and I'd be surprised - given the history of this country - if that were to change now.

<hr /></blockquote>

N.O wasnt just any ordinary city. It seems it was/is a city with huge problems which were widely know, but were never taken into account by any authority. They also knew that the poor part of town was on the lowest ground [ the more expensive houses are on higher ground] and is always at threat from flooding if there is a storm.
IMO, what happened here is that the authorities knew that a force 5 would flood the city [ its been shown that the defences could not withstand a force 5]and those parts at least should have been forcibly evacuated.
If they had told the people that it was almost certain that they would soon be under 20ft of water, I dont think many would have wanted to stay.
This is why I think that the most people on tv reports were black. Its not directly a race Q, its more to do with poverty.

Q

eg8r
09-08-2005, 10:29 AM
[ QUOTE ]
If they had told the people that it was almost certain that they would soon be under 20ft of water, I dont think many would have wanted to stay.
This is why I think that the most people on tv reports were black. Its not directly a race Q, its more to do with poverty.
<hr /></blockquote> What you posted was a race issue, otherwise there was no reason to point out color. I see you are backpedalliing on that, thanks.

With it being a poverty issue, it should not come as a surprise either. If you cannot afford something better, then you take what you can get. The big issue is why the mayor of NO did nothing to help these people. Why did the governor drag her feet when offered help from the Federal government and nearby states.

eg8r