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sneakypapi
09-05-2005, 08:50 PM
I was curious to get some opinions on what players think is harder. To run out <font color="blue"> </font color> on 9 ball or 8 ball?
I do know each game has its own challenges and patterns to master.

UTAddb
09-05-2005, 10:07 PM
I think you answered your own question.

Cueless Joey
09-05-2005, 10:54 PM
9-ball.
After the break you will need to hit the lowest numbered ball.
How many times do you pushout after the break?
In 8-ball, you have a lot of balls to start with.
I ran a rack of 8-ball on an 8 foot table when I was a D player. That tells you a lot. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
I've seen a few pro 8-ball tournaments.
They run out 8-ball racks at a much higher percentage than in 9-ball imo.

woody_968
09-05-2005, 11:21 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cueless Joey:</font><hr> I ran a rack of 8-ball on an 8 foot table when I was a D player. That tells you a lot. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
<hr /></blockquote>

I ran out a set (race to 5) of nineball when I was a D player, thanks to combos and 9's on the break /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

That being said I think both games offer their own challenges, so it almost depends on the player and what his strenghths are.

If pure shotmakeing is what he is strong at he may have a better chance of running a 9ball rack, he probably wont have to break up clusters and move around other balls as much. True he only has one ball to play shape on, but he is a shotmaker, if he can see it he can make it /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

If he has studied 8 ball or straight pool and is good at seeing proper patterns and can control the cueball he has more of a chance running out at 8ball.

I am acutally starting to enjoy 8ball more due to the art of reading the table and the importance of making the right choices.

Woody

theinel
09-05-2005, 11:50 PM
8-ball presents it's own challenges but in regards to running out in general, 9-ball is more difficult.

Some will disagree with this statement and site other factors including the skill of the player, the size and condition of the table, the balls being used, etc, but generally my original statement hold true.

Plummerbutt
09-06-2005, 08:35 PM
I guess when it comes to answering this one, we'll all have our own opinions.

Personally I feel that 9-ball is easier to run out and/or play. Safty play is easier in 9 ball, therefore I believe the whole game is easier.., and yes, I do play both quite abit.

Just my opinions. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

100andout
09-09-2005, 04:40 AM
I used to hate 8-ball because every banger in the world played it. At a top level it's a sweet game to watch. IMO 9-ball gets easier as the rack progresses towards the 9 because the table gets more open. In 8-ball the closer you get to the 8 the more dangerous it is if you don't get out because every ball you take off makes it less congested for your opponent. Now breaking and getting out in 8-ball is pretty tough considering all the obsticles and clusters the game offers. So, play more 14.1, learn to break out clusters, and work patterns, and both games will seem like a walk in the park!..........G

mworkman
09-09-2005, 06:18 AM
For me, it is easier to run a rack of 9-ball. I have a 7' table and the congestion makes the 8-ball rack more difficult. There isn't as much clutter playing 9-ball and I get out more often. When I practice I often switch between 8-ball, 9-ball and 14.1. When I can get into the 3rd rack in 14.1 I switch to 8-ball. When I run a rack in 8-ball, I go to 9-ball, and when I run that, I start back with 14.1. I should be playing banks also because it is a weakness of mine. I just haven't started yet.

Sid_Vicious
09-09-2005, 06:32 AM
"So, play more 14.1, learn to break out clusters, and work patterns, and both games will seem like a walk in the park!"

I play avid 14.1 players intermittently and I've not found them to be killer 9-ball players than everyday 9B'rs. The older veterans of 14.1 are good at both but they have the overall mileage. Otherwise it is my opinion that to play very good 9-ball, you need to play mostly 9-ball...sid

100andout
09-09-2005, 11:59 AM
Sid, I see your point, but I'm not saying if you become a strong 14.1 player, you automatically play great 9-ball. What I am saying is it will make you a much more complete player. I've played numerous "9ballers" that run out great on open tables, but when the rack becomes difficult, i.e. clusters, moving balls off rails when possible, combinations, kiss shots etc. they are lacking the skills. Also I've known players who played 14.1 almost exclusively that had week 9-ball breaks, had trouble with long draw shots, did'nt play kicks/safeties well from not playing enough 9-ball. If you ask MOST world class players what the best all around game to learn is, and they will tell you 14.1.

The list is endless with great 9-ballers who play world class 14.1
Mika Immonen, Efren, (I watched him run more than 300 in Philly! unfinished), Tony Robles, Ralph Souquet, Hopkins, Sigel, Varner, Johnny Archer, etc. all known for 9-ball by most, but all 100 + ball runners on any given day.....G

Eric.
09-09-2005, 12:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 100andout:</font><hr> I used to hate 8-ball because every banger in the world played it. At a top level it's a sweet game to watch. IMO 9-ball gets easier as the rack progresses towards the 9 because the table gets more open. In 8-ball the closer you get to the 8 the more dangerous it is if you don't get out because every ball you take off makes it less congested for your opponent. Now breaking and getting out in 8-ball is pretty tough considering all the obsticles and clusters the game offers. So, play more 14.1, learn to break out clusters, and work patterns, and both games will seem like a walk in the park!..........G <hr /></blockquote>

Just to throw in another view; I don't see it as clear cut as "one being easier than the other". While 14.1 and 8 ball have similarities like dealing with clusters, playing with a full rack, and to a lesser degree, pattern play, I feel they are much different. In 14.1, generally, you are not doing alot of traveling with the CB. You may have to in 8 ball becuase you only have so many balls to shoot at. Also, safety play is like night and day between the two.

9 ball is another animal too. Some of the skills necessary in 9 ball are practically non existant in 14.1 i.e. kicking, power breaking, multirail position routes, long tester shots, etc. While 9 ball might get easier late in the rack, you have to get there first. Also, it is generally harder to string racks of 9 ball, than it is in 14.1. Stringing 4-5 racks in 14.1 is not that noteworthy (for above average players), stringing 4-5 racks of 9 ball will get someone's attention real fast.


Eric

100andout
09-09-2005, 04:43 PM
Well put Eric!.....I guess thats why we love the different games played on a pool table. All are great in thier own way. Imagine having to play just one game ALL the time?!..Later.Gerry

theinel
09-10-2005, 01:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Eric.:</font><hr>...it is generally harder to string racks of 9 ball, than it is in 14.1. Stringing 4-5 racks in 14.1 is not that noteworthy (for above average players), stringing 4-5 racks of 9 ball will get someone's attention real fast.

Eric <hr /></blockquote>
Eric's text quoted above addresses the original post very well, albeit with different games. I posted on this already (and said that 9-ball is harder to run out than 8-ball and I stand by that given that the equipment is the same). I assumed that the original poster meant to break and run (or perhaps to run out immediately after the break). To put the major games in order of the difficulty of running out from the break I would say (easiest to hardest) 8-ball, 9-ball, one-pocket, 14.1. My answer to the same question but after the break and with ball in hand would probably be the same but one-pocket and 14.1 could switch depending on circumstances because the break in those games have a huge impact on how the games are played and whether it is even possible to run out.

In 8-ball and 9-ball, with an open break, 8-ball is just far easier to run out due to the large number options available. Even a congested table with many balls tied up can often be run. Skilled players feast upon 8-ball racks. In 9-ball there is only ever one target ball so if multiple balls are tied-up and not closely positioned the odds of running out drop dramatically.

For the record I'm not saying that 9-ball is a better game just that statistically, over time, it's a harder to run full racks. Find one-hundred skilled players and have them try a hundred racks of each game (offer to feed them or something and they might try it /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ). I'm sure my statement will hold up; anecdotal, unscientific, whatever you want to call it you will know it when you see it.

Off-topic, a really good game called Players Eight (or 8-ball rotation) is to start like 8-ball but require each player to sink their set of balls in numerical order (ascending for solids, descending for stripes) and then the 8. It combines the best of both games and is a real test of skill.