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View Full Version : What is at issue with likes/dislikes of Sardo rack



06-19-2002, 10:48 AM
Hi all: I know what the Sardo rack is, but I've not had occasion to use it up to this point.

It seems as though many of you here don't care for it, and I'd be interested to hear why people dislike it or feel that it isn't worthwhile.

I've gathered from reading previous posts that it can make marks on the table, but are there other detriments that affect game play?

Doctor_D
06-19-2002, 10:54 AM
Good afternoon:

I have used the rack and, in my biased opinion, it is a complicated piece of equipment that can not do the job it was designed to due unless the cloth has been dimpled to hold the balls. dimple the cloth and any rack will work as well as the Sardo Tight Rack.

Dr. D.

Scott Lee
06-19-2002, 10:55 AM
aldewey...LOL! You mean in terms of the fact that 1)it's detrimental affect to your cloth, 2)it's overpriced, or 3)once you have "trained" your cloth, you no longer have need for the rack, as the balls will 'rack' tight just by hand placing them into the divots created by the "training"? Add to that, it is not easy to use, and not very durable...
it would break if you dropped it on the floor (which a good wood rack will NOT do)! Take your pick!

Troy, did I get them all? LOL

Scott Lee

Rod
06-19-2002, 10:56 AM

06-19-2002, 10:59 AM
Hi Al.

1. Racks are too predictable... the same balls go right towards the corner pocket break after break, and the 1 ball is almost dead in the side. (My tapes of the 2001 Cardiff tournament are downright silly. The commentators had no choice but to point it out.)


2. It engenders the soft break, which is a total disaster from a fan's perspective.

3. A slowly-rolled cueball through the rack area is akin to something you might see on a carnival pool table.


4. Unnatural changes to the game become necessary to stop the wing balls from going, such as racking the 9 on the spot.


5. It introduces a piece of equipment at the pro level that no amateur will ever use. Even if an amateur went out and bought it (and they ain't cheap), no poolroom owner in his right mind would allow it to be used on his tables.

I'm sure there's more, but that's a good start :-)

- Steve

06-19-2002, 04:32 PM
Thanks, Scott.....and let me reassure you, I'm not trying to ignite a proverbial forest fire in asking. The only thing I've heard about the contraption up to now (excluding paid sponsorees) is that it marks the cloth, and when I ponder how many times the cloth gets "marked" through conventional racking methods (tapping the balls, etc.), I couldn't imagine why it was such a sore point. I've seen it used in a few televised events, and it didn't seem to affect play.

Being overpriced and not terribly durable are certainly valid gripes. I just had wondered how they physically affect play that potentially alters the game. In reading the previous responses, I guess it does change the strategy of breaking hard/soft, etc.

Thanks for the insights!

Al

06-19-2002, 04:45 PM
Dammit.....happened again. Every time I hit the refresh, it retags me Anonymous. Knowing what an issue some have with that, I'm reposting accordingly.

Thanks, Scott.....and let me reassure you, I'm not trying to ignite a proverbial forest fire in asking. The only thing I've heard about the contraption up to now (excluding paid sponsorees) is that it marks the cloth, and when I ponder how many times the cloth gets "marked" through conventional racking methods (tapping the balls, etc.), I couldn't imagine why it was such a sore point. I've seen it used in a few televised events, and it didn't seem to affect play.

Being overpriced and not terribly durable are certainly valid gripes. I just had wondered how they physically affect play that potentially alters the game. In reading the previous responses, I guess it does change the strategy of breaking hard/soft, etc.

Thanks for the insights!

Al

06-19-2002, 05:36 PM
I've never seen or used a Sardo rack. But from what I've read I think you have to condition the table, not just the cloth. I've read you wind up with indentations in the slate. And these can sometimes effect a slow rolling ball. But this is all hearsay or should I say readsay on my part.

06-19-2002, 05:42 PM
Here's another little bit of info regarding Sardo's price. On Ebay someone was having dutch auctions with lots of 50 Sardo racks. At first they were selling for maybe a little under $100, like about $99 each. Less then 10 sold. The next 6 lor 7 days a 50 lot sold for about $93 each. Less then 10 sold. And 6 or 7 days later another 50 lot sold for $89 each. Again I believe less then 20 sold. Maybe less then 10. And for the past 3 or 4 weeks I haven't seen any more dutch auctions on the Sardo racks.

Jay M
06-19-2002, 06:28 PM
the sardo rack requires that you train the table. What that means is that a template is placed on the table where the rack goes. There is a small hole where the ball would touch the table with a frozen rack. You place a drop of water in the hole, place a ball in the hole and "tap" the ball to settle the cloth. The reason tap is in quotes is because the two times I have seen them train tables, they actually bang on the ball with another ball, just like a beginning racker will do to the 1 ball if it doesn't sit still.

Slow rolling across the area where the table was trained results in some rather interesting results at times. Once the table has been trained, the main body of the rack is no longer necessary, we were using our bare hands to rack on the practice table at the US Open.

I'm not knocking the Sardo's, they are great guys. I just think they need to redesign the rack so that the training isn't necessary or the training doesn't cause the balls to deviate in their course.

Jay M

06-19-2002, 06:43 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Eddie G Chgo:</font><hr> I've read you wind up with indentations in the slate. <hr></blockquote>

...no, the dents are just in the cloth, not in the slate.

dan

Ken
06-19-2002, 07:06 PM
I have yet to hear from anyone who has examined the slate. I have seen Carmine "train" the one ball location in order to use the Sardo rack. He didn't break the balls but the force he used was about the equivalent to dropping a ball from about as high as anyone could reach. It was much more than taking the balls out of the ball return and dropping them on the table and I would be inclined to throw anyone out who insisted on doing that. I'd be very surprised if he did not chip the slate.
KenCT

Troy
06-20-2002, 10:41 AM
Yes Scott, I think you mentioned the salient points. And thanks for letting me avoid the blood pressure increase 'cuz every time I go through this I need a double dose of med's... /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Troy...~~~ Has "trained" a couple tables and actually used the SARDINE GIZMO.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Scott Lee:</font><hr> aldewey...LOL! You mean in terms of the fact that 1)it's detrimental affect to your cloth, 2)it's overpriced, or 3)once you have "trained" your cloth, you no longer have need for the rack, as the balls will 'rack' tight just by hand placing them into the divots created by the "training"? Add to that, it is not easy to use, and not very durable...
it would break if you dropped it on the floor (which a good wood rack will NOT do)! Take your pick!

Troy, did I get them all? LOL

Scott Lee <hr></blockquote>