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recoveryjones
09-15-2005, 06:57 PM
In the past year or so I've learned a few aiming systems that have made a BIG difference in my ability to pot balls.My 45 degree and less cuts are almost automatic and those finer tougher cuts have improved by at least 50 per cent.Even with this improvment, I want to get better.

If you are out there laughing at aiming systems....don't...because thet really do work.

Having said that, I still want to work on my stroke mechanics because I believe even though aiming systems make it much easier to aim, you still need to deliver your aim with a straight stroke.

Some would have you believe that aiming systems are a miraculous cure that will end all of your ball potting problems, however,I believe that a good straight stroke is of great importance along with the aiming system.

Some people put on unwanted english (me a slight tad of right)with their strokes.I've worked hard to find center ball,so I believe stroke is important and an aiming system alone won't cure your potting prophciency.I'm seeking to further solidify my stroke, with professional instruction.

Any comments appreciated. RJ

Barbara
09-15-2005, 07:06 PM
If you want to improve on your stroke mechanics, go to RandyG's Pool School, Fran Crimi, or any other qualified BCA Instructor.

Actually Dawn Hopkins started me on my road to stroke recovery and I don't believe she's BCA Certified, so maybe even a local pro can help you if they have the stroke and the ability to teach you what you want to learn.

But if you don't have the time to shop around, seek out a Master BCA Instructor.

Barbara

pooltchr
09-15-2005, 07:18 PM
RJ
If you can make it to Charlotte next month, Randy, Cane and myself will be teaching a class together. I would just about guarantee you would learn more about your stroke in those 3 days than you can imagine.
Steve

ras314
09-15-2005, 07:26 PM
I also have the problem putting a little unwanted right on the cb and am still working to get rid of it. Two things seem to cause it for me, twisting the wrist and moving the elbow in during the final stroke. Holding the cue lose usually cures the wrist problem. Trying to "pin" the elbow up by not dropping the elbow helps keep the tip moving straight, although it makes the stroke feel a little awkard and jerky during the follow thru.

I still find it next to impossible to hit the cb where I intend with a hard (four rail or more) stroke.

Without a competent person watching your stroke the next best thing is a camcorder. I have tried both and must admit bad habits are difficult to break.

recoveryjones
09-15-2005, 10:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> RJ
If you can make it to Charlotte next month, Randy, Cane and myself will be teaching a class together. I would just about guarantee you would learn more about your stroke in those 3 days than you can imagine.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Hi Steve, Thanks for the offer and I'd love to learn from you three.I've done everything I can to teach myself and now could use some help to fine tune things.

Charlotte's on the other end of the world from me because I'm from the West Coast.Traveling there would make things much more expensive for sure.Next time someones in seattle, please let me know.RJ

Scott Lee
09-16-2005, 02:13 AM
Steve...Don't forget about me!!!

Scott

dmgwalsh
09-16-2005, 03:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> If you want to improve on your stroke mechanics, go to RandyG's Pool School, Fran Crimi, or any other qualified BCA Instructor.
Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

I second that recommendation. I just finished a Pool School in Chicago with Randy G and Scott Lee and my stroke is on the road to recovery. The aiming system they showed us is truly amazing. I've been tinkering with it a few nights and am elated with the results, so far.

Scott, can you rustle up enough interest in a pool school up Seattle way to help out my fellow fanatic, RJ?

Dennis

DeathKnell
09-16-2005, 04:16 AM
Dr. Cue Billiads in the Shoreline area has a BCA Certified Instructor by the name of Ken "Sarge" Aylesworth. Might give that a try.

http://www.drcuebilliards.com/index.html

pooltchr
09-16-2005, 05:46 AM
Scott,
OOPS!!! Sorry about that. By the way, I think there is a NASCAR race in Charlotte that weekend, so you might want to make a reservation early. Pineville NC and Fort Mill SC are both within a couple of miles of the room. Comfort suites, Hampton, Holiday inn, Sleep inn and holiday express are all pretty close.
Steve

dr_dave
09-16-2005, 06:50 AM
FYI,

There have been several threads in the past dedicated to aiming systems. If you're interested, I have links to some of them in the threads summary portion of my website (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/threads.html). Others and I have expressed many opinions there.

BTW, I like the point you make about the importance of a consistent stroke. If you can't stroke straight, an accurate aim is not that useful (and vise versa).

Regards,
Dave

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote recoveryjones:</font><hr> In the past year or so I've learned a few aiming systems that have made a BIG difference in my ability to pot balls.My 45 degree and less cuts are almost automatic and those finer tougher cuts have improved by at least 50 per cent.Even with this improvment, I want to get better.

If you are out there laughing at aiming systems....don't...because thet really do work.

Having said that, I still want to work on my stroke mechanics because I believe even though aiming systems make it much easier to aim, you still need to deliver your aim with a straight stroke.

Some would have you believe that aiming systems are a miraculous cure that will end all of your ball potting problems, however,I believe that a good straight stroke is of great importance along with the aiming system.

Some people put on unwanted english (me a slight tad of right)with their strokes.I've worked hard to find center ball,so I believe stroke is important and an aiming system alone won't cure your potting prophciency.I'm seeking to further solidify my stroke, with professional instruction.

Any comments appreciated. RJ <hr /></blockquote>

Stretch
09-16-2005, 09:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dr_dave:</font><hr> FYI,

There have been several threads in the past dedicated to aiming systems. If you're interested, I have links to some of them in the threads summary portion of my website (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/threads.html). Others and I have expressed many opinions there.

BTW, I like the point you make about the importance of a consistent stroke. If you can't stroke straight, an accurate aim is not that useful (and vise versa).

Regards,
Dave

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote recoveryjones:</font><hr> In the past year or so I've learned a few aiming systems that have made a BIG difference in my ability to pot balls.My 45 degree and less cuts are almost automatic and those finer tougher cuts have improved by at least 50 per cent.Even with this improvment, I want to get better.

If you are out there laughing at aiming systems....don't...because thet really do work.

Having said that, I still want to work on my stroke mechanics because I believe even though aiming systems make it much easier to aim, you still need to deliver your aim with a straight stroke.

Some would have you believe that aiming systems are a miraculous cure that will end all of your ball potting problems, however,I believe that a good straight stroke is of great importance along with the aiming system.

Some people put on unwanted english (me a slight tad of right)with their strokes.I've worked hard to find center ball,so I believe stroke is important and an aiming system alone won't cure your potting prophciency.I'm seeking to further solidify my stroke, with professional instruction.

Any comments appreciated. RJ <hr /></blockquote> <hr /></blockquote>

RJ i liked your choice of words, Solidifying. A big breakthrough for me was when i slowed down the back swing. An easy yet controlled back swing is like the anchor of the shot. My first pumps of the cue are just loosen up strokes, all i'm doing is rehersing the back swing. Then i sight in the shot for real, Pause, and i know how to draw back for the best exicution.

I believe most mechanical problems stem from the drawback and transition phaze of the stroke. Once u pull the trigger and fire to the target that's it, trigger fire. BUT the end of the backstroke is the start of the exicution stroke, if your wrong on the first, your wrong on the last. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif St.