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View Full Version : Little Things make a difference



Cane
10-07-2005, 09:55 AM
About 4 or 5 weeks ago, I had a small accident. Where to start... well, my shop is a converted Carriage House behind our main home (the house was built in 1904, so Carriage Houses were commonplace), and it has very heavy sliding barn style doors on it. I was closing the sliding door and it stuck, so I grabbed it in the only way that I could to insure that I got injured in some manner and pulled the door closed... on my right index finger. Well, it didn't break it, but it damn sure made it sore. It made it so sore, in fact, that I had to change my grip to play pool. I generally cradle the cue loosely in a curled index finger with my thumb lying alongside just to keep it from falling out on the floor. My index finger wouldn't curl enough to hold the cue well, and being a true addict, I wasn't about to quit playing pool until it healed. To get around this, I went from my normal grip, which I call a forward hinge, to a center hinge, replacing the function of my index finger with my middle finger. It wasn't bad, but my game did fall off. I stayed with this until a couple of days ago, when I could finally bend that index finger again and grip my cue as normal. MAN, WHAT A DIFFERENCE!!! My draw came back, as a matter of fact, I had to temper it a little, because I'd been overpowering with the center hinge, my accuracy came back. Everything was as it should be.

The only reason I'm posting this is that so many times I see people post on here and ask why they've fallen out of stroke, or why they're in a slump. Well, it could be something so small, so subtle as a little change in grip that takes you out of form. Little Things DO make a difference.

Later,
Bob

Stretch
10-07-2005, 10:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> About 4 or 5 weeks ago, I had a small accident. Where to start... well, my shop is a converted Carriage House behind our main home (the house was built in 1904, so Carriage Houses were commonplace), and it has very heavy sliding barn style doors on it. I was closing the sliding door and it stuck, so I grabbed it in the only way that I could to insure that I got injured in some manner and pulled the door closed... on my right index finger. Well, it didn't break it, but it damn sure made it sore. It made it so sore, in fact, that I had to change my grip to play pool. I generally cradle the cue loosely in a curled index finger with my thumb lying alongside just to keep it from falling out on the floor. My index finger wouldn't curl enough to hold the cue well, and being a true addict, I wasn't about to quit playing pool until it healed. To get around this, I went from my normal grip, which I call a forward hinge, to a center hinge, replacing the function of my index finger with my middle finger. It wasn't bad, but my game did fall off. I stayed with this until a couple of days ago, when I could finally bend that index finger again and grip my cue as normal. MAN, WHAT A DIFFERENCE!!! My draw came back, as a matter of fact, I had to temper it a little, because I'd been overpowering with the center hinge, my accuracy came back. Everything was as it should be.

The only reason I'm posting this is that so many times I see people post on here and ask why they've fallen out of stroke, or why they're in a slump. Well, it could be something so small, so subtle as a little change in grip that takes you out of form. Little Things DO make a difference.

Later,
Bob <hr /></blockquote>

U make a great point Cane! If all it takes is a missplaced finger to tip the ballance in your "A" game, imagine the many other abberations that unconciously creep in over time due to lazyness, apathy, u know, not following your routine. I tell ya, all it takes is your foot a little wrong or a shoe lace untied and that's it, over! lol

It's like anything else though eh? You gotta constantly review the basics and stay well rehersed on shots that require "stroke".

Sorry to here about the finger. Have u ever tryed a grip that favors the pinky finger? It works great for long shots where your just trying to make the shot. Don't ask me why, my gut tells me it's just one of those subtle things that in my mind alignes the wrist better threw the ball at lag wieght, when your dialing long distance.

grips, ya.....there's a whole thread /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif St.

theinel
10-08-2005, 03:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Stretch:</font><hr>... a shoe lace untied ...<hr /></blockquote>
I played nearly flawless pool for three hours one night and then someone politely mentioned that my shoe lace way untied. I tied it and then went on to miss almost every ball for the next hour. I'm sure the lace had nothing to do with anything but I can say for sure that little things can make a big difference. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

pooltchr
10-08-2005, 05:21 AM
Bob,
Great post, but was it really necessary to inflict that kind of pain on yourself to learn it????? /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

J.K., my friend. Hope you have healed up ok!
Steve

Rich R.
10-08-2005, 05:38 AM
Cane, maybe you should bang your finger again, and give the middle finger another try. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Since I can see Cane's middle finger starting to rise, let me explain.

Through the years, there have been several threads on hear, discussing grips. In almost every thread, the conclusion was that the index finger was some kind of aiming finger and, if used to grip the cue, could be detrimental to your game. The middle finger was always considered a better option.

I also discussed this, very briefly, with Randy, at pool school, and IIRC, he agreed that the index finger should not be used to grip the cue.

So, to give this change a fair chance, you should go back to that door and .........
Well, maybe you could find a better way. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Cane
10-08-2005, 06:56 AM
You know Rich, you may well have a point. Everything is about lines, alignment and straight lines, right. Well, if you look at your hand (as I did this morning) with it relaxed and hanging at your side, your middle finger is more in line with the arm than any other finger, so maybe, mechanically, the middle finger IS a better tool. I have a good friend who uses a center hinge grip and shoots A+ pool. My problem is that I've never been able to relax my middle finger enough to get that super loose grip that I like and I can't follow as well, draw as well, side spin as well, and find myself "forcing" shots using a center hinge... maybe your right about something else; my middle finger could be over developed from excess use! /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

For me, however, I better stick with what works! I damn sure don't want to close the garage door on my hand again to try to develop a good center hinge, and I'm afraid that's the only way I'll give up my forward hinge!

Later,
Bob

Isshi
10-08-2005, 08:03 AM
Rich R quotes a consensus as saying that
the index finger should not be used to grip the cue.

That's interesting, and makes me wonder about my own grip.

I'm not so tall, only 6'1", but I grip my (Predator) cue like (I
think) Jeremy Jones does- by the very butt of the cue, holding
the end by just my thumb and index finger. No other digit
in my shooting (right) hand even touches the cue.

For the sake of getting a better grip, should I get
a longer shaft perhaps? That would mean a special order,
of course.

Just a C player, Isshi.

Sid_Vicious
10-08-2005, 09:48 AM
"Sorry to here about the finger. Have u ever tryed a grip that favors the pinky finger? It works great for long shots where your just trying to make the shot. Don't ask me why"

Think about it. With the butt of the cue projecting out of what is in effect a reverse conical fixture, your grip having no forward contact on the cue, you greatly limit your off line stroke errors(steering.) One downside though is that your BHE players utilize that feel with the forward grip. Just be sure you want a fundamentally straight stroke ALL of the time, else you'll fix one thing and break another facet in the process. Great cuepersons use both fluidly, a natural act if you will. This is where "natural" surpassess the learned abilities(IMMHO)..sid.