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View Full Version : what game is this and how do you play?



sack316
10-12-2005, 03:11 PM
ok, I don't know if anyone knows this one or not, but I've always been curious about it. Not to make it a racial thing, but I always see the guys that work at the Mexican restaurant playing it. What they do is line up a ball on every diamond on each side rail, and one ball on the footspot (I think it's usually the 3 ball). Game starts with cue ball in kitchen, and the ball on the footspot is hit first. From there I tend to lose track of what's going on. I plan on asking whoever is playing it next time I see it, but was just hoping someone here may know what it is and how you play it. Thanks!
Sack

Bob_Jewett
10-12-2005, 06:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sack316:</font><hr> ... What they do is line up a ball on every diamond on each side rail, and one ball on the footspot (I think it's usually the 3 ball). ... <hr /></blockquote>
There is a kind of rotation that is played with all the balls starting at the diamonds, but all 15 balls are used. I think it's called Chicago in some rule books.

SPetty
10-13-2005, 07:23 AM
I asked about this game years ago - maybe before the board changed because I can't find my old post. But it's a game that Spiderman has dubbed Mexican Bang-a-Ball, and his thread is here:

M-BAB (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showflat.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=140875)

Fran Crimi
10-13-2005, 08:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote sack316:</font><hr> ... What they do is line up a ball on every diamond on each side rail, and one ball on the footspot (I think it's usually the 3 ball). ... <hr /></blockquote>
There is a kind of rotation that is played with all the balls starting at the diamonds, but all 15 balls are used. I think it's called Chicago in some rule books. <hr /></blockquote>

Here in the East, we've always played Chicago as a regular 15 ball rotation game with 'ways'. The 'ways' are 1,5,8,10,13,15, and the last 'way' is the total accumulated points of all the balls collected by the team. It's played with 4 players; whoever pockets the 1 and 5 are partners. If the same person pockets the 1&amp;5, the person who pockets the next 'way' is their partner. The team that collects the most 'ways' wins the game. If your team collects all the 'ways' it's called a roundhouse and your team collects double the bet from your opponents. If you score all the 'ways' yourself, you score a 'solo' and collect double the bet from the other three.

It's a great game. We play where you have to go for the hit even if you can't see the ball, but after partners are determined, it changes to a push-out game.

Fran

sack316
10-13-2005, 09:50 AM
thanks for the replies and thanks for linking that thread SPetty. Sounds like several of us have seen that game from time to time, but none of us know the exact way to play it! It just always looked interesting to me and it always seemed like they were having so much fun with it. Guess I'll ask if I can hop in next time I see them and see what I can learn about it. Between their broken english and my broken spanish maybe I'll figure it out /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
sack

Bob_Jewett
10-13-2005, 11:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr> ... There is a kind of rotation that is played with all the balls starting at the diamonds, but all 15 balls are used. I think it's called Chicago in some rule books. <hr /></blockquote>

It's called "Chicago Pocket Billiards" in the 1914 BBC Co. Rule Book. That's available on-line at http://www.sfbilliards.com/rules_1914tpr.pdf -- go to page number 35 (or 37 in the document reader, which counts the covers).

Is that the game you saw?

theinel
10-14-2005, 01:57 PM
I play at a pool hall that has a large Mexican contingent that play this game almost exclusively. They call it "Mexican Pool". Most references to it from older literature call it "Chicago" or something similar. In the "Illustrated Encyclopedia of Billiards" Mike Shamos also lists references that call it "Chicago Pool", "Boston Pool", and "Mexican Rotation". I've called this mexican game Chicago in the presence of several older guys, mostly from the northern part of the country, and they all say Chicago is what the rule books call Rotation and many add rules like the one Fran listed.

As the original poster mentioned the main difference that I see from the rules being used locally and the rules provided by Mike Shamos and the BBC rules provided by Bob (thanks Bob) is that the 1 and 2 balls are eliminated and the 3 ball is started on the foot spot and has it's value increased to six to make up for the points lost by removing the 1 and 2 balls.