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View Full Version : Opinions on lack of playing pool



sneakypapi
10-15-2005, 12:12 AM
I wanted to get some input regarding time playing pool.
I consider myself a casual player who plays an average of one time per week typically on the weekends for a few hours at a time (maybe 4 hours). The places I shot at would be a bar setting and if you lose you will have to wait to play again because of a few tables.

My question is this I am consider myself a decent player who has a good knowledge of english, tangent line and other aspects of the game, beyond just a player who just shoots to shoot and never learned anything beyond center english. I find the lack of table time and the lack of just practicing affects my game to where my stroke is not consistant and my position player is off. Am I expecting too much of myself without really getting down and practicing? I think that I should be able to play and remember things that I have acheived before, am I wrong?

pooltchr
10-15-2005, 03:17 AM
Playing once a week is not going to give you much chance to improve. It's probably not enough to maintain your present level, especially since you are only playing. You absolutely have to have practice time as well as play time to get your game to improve. For every 4 hours of playing time, you should have 1 hour of serious focused practice time. This means practicing your speed control, cue ball control, stroke mechanics, and the other things that all come into play when you get in a match or game.
You might be expecting a bit much for the time you are able to put into it. Considering the rotating in and out of games at your pool room, and the fact that there is also another player involved in your games, you might only be getting 1 hour of table time out of that 4 hours you are spending at the pool room. It's really tough to get much accomplished under those circumstances.
Steve

Snapshot9
10-15-2005, 05:27 AM
You don't learn when you play in a competition with an opponent, you learn when you practice by yourself where
you are able to repeat shots or drills time and time again
till you learn how to do it. The other option is under
the tutorship of a qualified instructor. There are building
blocks in learning how to play Pool, and if you skip a few,
you wiil be like a three legged table. Get a good book or two on Pool, and read first. Then go practice the shots
and drills in the book. It is not enough that you learn
how to make a shot, you have to learn how to do it with 9
different types of English, and know where the cue ball will
end up. Same for banks, you need to know how to shoot them
for all kinds of english, not just 1 type. It takes the right approach, time and practice, and a lot of work.

tjlmbklr
10-15-2005, 05:42 AM
[ QUOTE ]
My question is this I am consider myself a decent player who has a good knowledge of english, tangent line and other aspects of the game, <hr /></blockquote>

If I wasn't sure, I'd think I was drunker then I was last night and wrote this post under a assumed name. Your story is almost word for word the same as mine.

Sid_Vicious
10-15-2005, 06:21 AM
"I think that I should be able to play and remember things that I have acheived before, am I wrong?"

If you've done it once, you still know how to do it again. I went through a slump over the summer because I reduced my play time to league night and one weekend day, hence the natural flow and recurrance of known skills were always off. I am currently on a sabbatical from work and have worn out the PH with my presense having fun playing, and believe me, my game came back in a big way. IMO you can practice until your arms fall off, but hitting a lot of balls and playing a lot of games, day after day will get you back to playing the way you remember from before...sid

Scott Lee
10-16-2005, 11:14 AM
I'll add one more thing to what Pooltcher said. Serious practice should be broken up into very short segments. Otherwise, you get frustrated, bored, or angry...none of which are condusive to learning or retention. Practice something intently for 5-10 minutes, and then do something else to relax your body and brain. But for that 5-10 minutes, you should act physically and mentally like EVERY shot is the game-winner. That means having a dedicated pre-shot routine, and STAYING in it throughout the process. Most misses, miscues, etc, are a result of falling out of your routine (if you even have one). jmo

Scott Lee

Drop1
10-16-2005, 12:09 PM
You are kidding right? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif