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View Full Version : just got back from cue-tech pool school....WOW!



scottycoyote
10-17-2005, 07:24 AM
ok im back from cue-tech pool school and all i can say is I am supremely impressed.

While I mostly just lurk here and post over on AZ, I wanted to share this, so here it is. First off I want to start with a disclaimer of sorts. One thing RandyG said to me was that i was an excellent student. I got to thinking about that on my drive home tonight and you know what..........hes right. That may seem like a bold or egotistical statement, but let me explain. My whole life so far I have been a student, grade school, high school, college, and now due to my profession, I have to attend 4 or 5 seminars for several days every year to maintain my position. So for about 33 or 34 of my 38 years I have been a student, Ive learned how to take my ego out of the learning process, and go into a teaching/learning situation and get quite a bit out of it. The reason im mentioning this, is I noticed that I seemed to really walk away from this class extremely pumped up and excited, lightbulbs going off all during the course for me, and Randy was noticing this too. I guess my point is this...........I walked away from the class unbelieveably pleased with the material, what i perceive as my progress, and my future game of pool, but I also think I might be a best case scenario, and maybe if youre not a good student, or you have a huge ego, or maybe youre married to your current fundamentals because of the time or money already invested in them, and youre not open to a new way to do things...........well maybe you wont have the same results as me, so keep that in mind.

DAY ONE
........I walked in eager, with some skepticism, because this was my first pool lesson of any kind. While im no expert let me say Ive been playing pool off and on for the last 20 years (with a 10 year layoff in the middle), and the last 3 years more seriously than I ever did before. My home pool room considers me a b+, a-, and honestly i considered myself a pretty good player, who breaks down here and there and just needing to get some answers. Randy started the school with all of us sitting down and im looking at this guy thinking, "I've never seen you on tv, I've never seen you beat archer or strickland or reyes, how do I know youre any good". Sure we all say that a great player doesnt make a good teacher, but I think deep down you want to learn from someone whos recognized as a great player, because theyre doing something right to be that good, and if they could teach it to you, well jackpot.
End of day one I walked away, not really very excited. I could see how what I was being taught might help my game a little if I could apply it, but applying it might be a problem.

DAY TWO
I come back into class, and as the day progresses Im noticing progress in my stroke........Im able to do what the instructors want me to do, where the day before I was struggling. Mind you Im not pocketing balls, Im doing drills to work on my stroke, so I really dont know if this is helping my pool game, I just know Im doing what Randy is trying to teach me with alot more ease. During both days we have been videotaped and graded on a checklist of things, and ive made vast improvement per them from day one over to day two.

DAY THREE
The students are turned loose a little more, Im getting to shoot shots and pocket balls.....and Im noticing that im very smooth, my draw and follow are better than Ive ever known with minimal effort on my part. Probably around 11am Randy dropped a series of bombs on us (or at least me) that had me just repeatedly saying "wow" out loud.......looking at other students and shaking my head......just completely bowled over. I was shooting shots with ease I would have struggled with before the school. For instance, my draw was getting worse and worse. Seems like a few years ago i had decent draw in terms of distance, not controllable but impressive. As of late I felt like I was killing the cueball and if the object ball was far away the draw was pathetic. This afternoon, i could put the cueball on the head spot.......an object ball straight in down by the footspot....and draw the cue back to the headrail with a lite medium stroke. This had my jaw dropping because I might could have done that with a hard stroke and make the shot 2 out of 10 times before.......I was doing it 4 out of 5 times now......with HALF THE STROKE!!!. There was alot more differences I noticed, this was just one of the things that popped out at me. I could go on and on here, but you get the jist. And this is just day 3 of the school......imagine what this will do for my poolgame over time as i get to work with it and let it become habit.


SO A CONCLUSION
...........I paid $625, and drove about 1200 miles between friday and sunday. Im tired, my back is sore, I miss my girlfriend, but Im more excited about my pool game than I think Ive ever been since I first picked the game up and started making progress in it. To me, $625 isnt a lot of money, but its nothing to sneeze at either. But considering how I feel right now about my game and my future ability to play, progress and diagnose my game from here on out, it seems like a complete steal. I think I would have paid 3 or 4 times the price if I knew before the school what I know now. Its just a complete program, including alot of psychology, physiology, physics, sports psychology, and of course........POOL!

Before I was a pretty good player who played well in spite of my pool game..............RandyG and the cue-tech instructors have given me the tools and knowledge to become an excellent player BECAUSE of my pool game.

I dont want to sound sappy, or like Ive been brainwashed, but i really feel like RandyG and the cue-tech instructors have given me a wonderful gift. I cant recommend this course enough if you have questions and really want someone to give you the answers like I did.

DennyS
10-17-2005, 08:44 AM
Really no surprise! Randy and everyone at Cue-Tech do a great job.One of the premiere schools in the country.Keep up the good work Randy. Denny

pooltchr
10-17-2005, 10:50 AM
Scott,
It takes a good student to get as much out of the class as you did. You were easy to work with, followed the guidance of the instructors, and as a result began seeing instant improvement. That long draw shot was impressive. I was watching, and from where I stood, your stroke looked smooth, almost effortless, and I didn't think the cue ball was ever going to stop!

All of the instructors got together after class Sunday night and agreed it was one of the best groups of students we had seen assembled in one class. It was fun teaching, and seeing such dramatic results in all the students.

John told me he took great pride in seeing so much improvement on your part in such a short period of time.

We had the easy job teaching. You students really had to do the work, and you did great.

It was a pleasure meeting you and working with you. Good luck as you apply all you learned toward improving your pool game.

Steve

wolfdancer
10-17-2005, 11:14 AM
Scotty, you sound like an instructor's dream student...open to new ideas, and no preconceived dogmatic concepts of your own, that would interfere with the lessons.
Since $625 is not a lot of money to you, but represents the rent, milk, and flu shot expenses for me....I hope when I ask you to sponsor me, you won't go Coyote Ugly on me.

http://ia.imdb.com/media/imdb/01/I/82/27/98m.jpg

Deeman3
10-17-2005, 11:15 AM
Scotty,

Congratulations on your nice experience. Randy, Steve and the whole bunch are really first rate people. That has got to make the experience just that much better. Just think of all the things you could have invested that money in that you would soon forget about. If you pay attention to what you have learned you'll carry it to the grave with you.

I hope your game continues to grow.

Deeman

joepool
10-17-2005, 02:47 PM
Sounds great. I am scheduled for the first week of November. Can't wait to go!

Cane
10-18-2005, 06:43 AM
Scott, Steve and others that were there:

I teach a lot of pool, but I have to say that this was one of the most enjoyable classes I've been involved in as an instructor in a very long time. As instructors, Mike, Steve, John and especially Randy, were an absolute pleasure to work with. As students, this was a very open, very receptive and all around great group to work with. I don't think ANY of them will leave what they learned behind. By day three, every student in the class had made remarkable improvements and were excited about the potential future of their game.

Scott, in particular, showed as much excitement and resolve to improve his game as any player I've ever been involved with as a student. He came there with a fairly strong game. He left there looking like a completely different poolplayer... We didn't "change" Scott's game, we tailored it to how he plays, and I'm going to go out on a limb right now and say, anyone that lives close to Scott... you better get your licks in before the next few weeks, because after that, he's gonna give you all you want!!!

As for things "not pool school", I had a blast in North Carolina! The only thing I didn't enjoy was the 14 hour each way drive... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif Other than that, it was great. The Green Room treated us like we were something special and I'll never forget the stories, the games and the friendships developed there.

Well, now I get to rest a couple of weeks, then it's off to Dallas to assist Randy and the other instructors in an Expert Class at Cue Tech's home school. Already looking forward to that! Just as much, I'm looking forward to another Randy G Pool School road show next year in Charlotte.

DAMN, I LOVE WHAT I DO!!! God has graced me by giving me the oppurtunity to teach others what I love doing so much.

Later,
Bob <<<Still excited and pumped up about the Charlotte Experience!!!

scottycoyote
10-18-2005, 07:10 AM
Steve and Bob, thanks for the kind words and it was great meeting you both.......and Id like to say I thought all the instructors were excellent, I just mention Randy predomintantly in my first post because he was the lead instructor, but you all gave me some great tips. Bob, who is a tall and large guy like myself was extremely helpful, we talked about how we thought tall people had a little different set of obstacles to overcome and I even incorporated some of the things he showed me into my own personal shooting routine.
I have to say I felt extremely lucky to have John as my one on one instructor. ALthough he is a new instructor, he was extremely knowledgeable and just so engaged in the process. I felt like when i went to work on my drill it wasnt me working and him watching, I felt like it was a team effort thing.....we were both doing the drill and he wanted me to get it as bad as i did......it was very intense.
The atmosphere was so open and relaxed......if I had a question, I would ask one of you guys.....and off we would go to a table to work on it. Kudos for a great great program.

Qtec
10-18-2005, 09:34 AM
What were the 'bombs' that were dropped.
Sounds interesting.
Did they mention S.A.M at all?
Just wondering.

Q

scottycoyote
10-18-2005, 10:46 AM
SAM was one of the bombs, i have been tinkering with it since then and for my game it is deadly. I did some drills last night for 20 mins then i threw racks of nineball out on the table and practiced for 30 mins and i missed 3 balls. Another bomb was a trick randy showed us for 2 different draw bridges, which definitely played apart in my smooth table draw i talked about in my first post. For me theres a few angle shots where I have to get calibrated in my head a little bit better, SAM seems to be a little off for me on those shots but for the majority of my shots its dead on.

silverbullet
10-18-2005, 12:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> Scotty, you sound like an instructor's dream student...open to new ideas, and no preconceived dogmatic concepts of your own, that would interfere with the lessons.
Since $625 is not a lot of money to you, but represents the rent, milk, and flu shot expenses for me....I hope when I ask you to sponsor me, you won't go Coyote Ugly on me.

http://ia.imdb.com/media/imdb/01/I/82/27/98m.jpg <hr /></blockquote>

I think it would be more accurate to say that that $625 is not a lot of money for what you get. It also is considerably less than some other pool schools which IMO do not benefit the student nearly as much as Randy's does.

Laura

pooltchr
10-18-2005, 03:42 PM
Bob,
When I get as old as you, ( /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif ) I hope I can quit my day job and just teach pool full time!

Glad you decided to make the trip. Always a pleasure working with you! Here's to many more classes together!

Still trying to figure out what Gene was talking about with that "draw stroke high center" comment! But what the heck, he sure makes a durn good scotch doubles partner!!!
(Even when he's had a few too many)

Looking forward to the next time!
Steve

MacGyver
10-18-2005, 04:15 PM
So.... what is SAM???

wolfdancer
10-18-2005, 07:56 PM
[ QUOTE ]

I think it would be more accurate to say that that $625 is not a lot of money for what you get. <hr /></blockquote>
That seems to be the consensus among the folks that went, and posted a report here.
I wish that I had attended a good pool school, several years ago, when I could still see the edges on the O.B.
Nice to see you back, Laura

scottycoyote
10-18-2005, 08:17 PM
SAM stands for supplemental aiming method. Its cue-techs version of hal houles aiming system. Its hard to explain, i think its something that has to be shown on the table but I can tell you it definitely works for me. I probably am using it on about 90% of my shots right now.

tjlmbklr
10-20-2005, 07:17 PM
OHH....OHH...I wanna go I wanna go.....!
But I agree $625 is mortgage, sugar daddy gifts for the lovely lady and beer money. LOL

pooltchr
10-20-2005, 07:32 PM
It sounds like a lot, but I wouldn't be surprised in over half the people on this forum are carrying at least that much in their cue case into the pool room every night. I can't even count the number of cues I see costing far more than that in the hands of some players who don't understand why they are still a C player. The return on investment is far greater with pool school than with any cue stick you can buy.
Just another way of looking at things...
Steve

caedos
11-02-2005, 11:32 PM
What is S.A.M.? Without trying to stir up the fire again, I'll try to explain (again). Also: take a look at this link http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showflat.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=206122&amp;page=0&amp;v iew=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;fpart=2#Post208070

And have fun sifting through it all. There are several aiming discussions in the CCB history you can find if you look up Hal Houle, aiming, S.A.M., and whatever related key words that come to mind.

As for what S.A.M. is... it is the set of aimpoints for the fractional aiming method. It is the inverse (almost exactly) of the system CJ Wiley has on his Volume 3 of 'Ultimate Pool Secrets' video. If you can roll your cue-ball in a straight line to the same point on an object ball over and over again, it will produce the same resultant path for the object ball over and over again. The contact point between the balls is not relevant to the shooter using the system, because it will happen automatically just by shooting the cue ball to the correct aimpoint. A straight shot is a #1 Aim in S.A.M. and only requires you shoot the cue ball in a line to a point on the vertical center of the object ball. This is usually done with the aimpoint being where the object ball touches the table or at the topmost part of the object ball (tougher to be precise but has better lighting). A half-ball hit releases the object ball from contact at about 30-degrees from the cue ball path (not the cue-ball to object ball line), and is the #3 Aim in S.A.M. This is the second reference for me after the #1 when I'm shooting because it has a well-defined aimpoint, the outermost edge of the object ball away from the object ball target (the pocket, most of the time). The #2 is halfway between, but uses a point on the edge of the object ball to aim at and not the body of the ball (it's tough to pick a point in the middle of a solid colored sphere); #2 releases at approximately 15-degrees. #1 is straight on, #2 is a 3/4 full hit, #3 is half-ball, #4 is 1/4 ball, #5 is 1/8 ball, and #6 is Thin. Fractional aiming has been around for a long time, and this system is another way to use it to greater effect. The #4 is hit by estimating your aimpoint onto the felt beside the object ball or by matching the #2 inside aimpoint position on the cueball to the #3 aimpoint outer edge of the object ball. #5 aimpoint is a similar estimate, and because the edges of the cue-ball and object ball are receding very quickly the penalty for error seems more extreme; I tend to leave S.A.M. for the #5 (1/8th ball hit) because I focus on the amount of ball overlap and not a point on the felt. #6 is for Thin cuts and is often taught by aiming through the contact edges of both balls and parallel shifting to the center of the cue-ball. There is no exact science that will produce a perfect aiming system. I agree with Bob Jewett when he said something to the effect of needing to know what stinks about a system before being able to use it well. What stinks to me about this system is that there is an intangible quality that appears when using the system because the subconscious mind has to be allowed to use the mind and body to make the shot look, feel, and become 'right'. This means you can say a shot is a #3 Aim all the way and maybe it's really a #3.463024 Aim or a #2.903882 Aim. If you want to play pool you will either call it a #3 and let your brain do the rest, you will use a #3 Aim as the reference and let your brain thicken or thin the hit to make it right, you will find some other way to make this system work for you, you will abandon the system for something else that makes more sense, or you will have a nervous breakdown and take up checkers because the checks taste better when the thorazine kicks in. This is a crude explanation of S.A.M. The assumption is that the shooter will use the cue stick as the pointer for the line the cue ball needs to travel down to get to the aimpoint (a specifically chosen point at the end of that line), thus making the cue-ball travel an easier task. The shooter then lets the stroke work and the cue ball has no choice but to go down the line. It's less stress. Having an aimpoint to shoot directly at removes confusion over contact points and simplifies the process so that the shooting routine completes a circuit with no loose ends and has the added benefit of a complete command structure, leading to a more focused shooter. K.I.S.S(illy).

I don't know how to explain this any better without writing about peculiarities of individual's vision and perception, the optical illusions of sphere's at different distances for different angles, or an aimpoint matrix relationship between the cue-ball and the object ball that's best represented using several cue balls and a matching number of object balls. This is the structure that I believe helps one to play better. Further analysis should be for the joy of information gathering, because I doubt it will help one to play better. When using English, please hold to the cue ball line needed for aiming because your cue will not be on it due to deflection and cue-ball squirt.

I haven't been on this board much lately. I would be happy to answer questions as always. Just reply to this post and it should show up in my regular e-mail. This post is not intended to advertise services or taunt readers by withholding necessary information. This is a fairly complete explanation, inasmuch as I know how to post the information. Please refer any concerns or issues with this post to me personally and I will try to remedy the matter to a mutual satisfaction.


Have Fun!

Carl

SPetty
11-03-2005, 08:30 AM
Wow, caedos, that was great! Thank you so very much for taking the time and effort and putting it in writing like that for everyone to see. I'm glad you mentioned the subconscious adjustment aspect. That makes it a lot easier to accept and understand the system.

Sid_Vicious
11-03-2005, 09:35 AM
Mix in any kind of bottom english to this system and you are back to square one in it's projected simplicity. This is where the major problem arises IMO(as mostly a 9-ball player needing to move the CB a lot by using draw.) When it all comes down to it, any aiming system is merely a practice tool, but when you are in the trenches you'll need to go with an individual instinct and feel. Trying to use a system at that time just clutters the mind, and eventually you stagger and start to worry. Worry is a bad thing. Truly playing your best pool grows out of playing a lot of pool, and then a lot more pool. Aiming get to be a natural, and natural IMO is when I am having the most fun with this sport. It is only a hard game if you think it is hard.

I'll pick a specific aim routine when I am in a critical part of the run, but then get back to running around the table asap. Jm2c...sid

Cane
11-03-2005, 11:49 AM
Sid, Well, I don't see where bottom english makes any difference. I use draw, inside, follow, force follow, outside, whatever I need, and it doesn't effect the SAM Aiming at all.

BUT, I do agree that when you're at the table, you can't sit and analyze the hell out of each and every shot. BUT in practice YOU MUST. When I'm practicing, I use SAM, Pivot, Shisk-Ka-Bob, Small Ball and other systems. When I play, I haven't the foggiest idea what I'm doing. I just play pool. My mind knows where to shoot the ball, it knows what cue tip location I need on the CB, it knows what speed I need... but that comes from structured targetted practice, using precise and regimented systems.

Example... I play a lot of bank pool, and one of my "signature" shots is a 3 cushion bank into the side pocket. I'm VERY high percentage on that shot... VERY HIGH. I learned that shot shooting strictly a predefined aim point, over and over and over again in practice. I still shoot it from different positions on the table, but when I get in a game, I KNOW that shot. I don't think "Oh, this is a SAM 2" or "SAM 3, 3 speed", I just shoot the shot, and I make it. I don't just make it because I'm lucky, I make it because I practiced it from different positions, using a regimented aiming method, until every scenario where I might have to perform that shot is engrained into my brain so that I can do it without conscious consideration of Aim points, spin or speed. Of course, those considerations are made, but their made on a subconscious level, because conscious regimented practice has made them second nature.

Someone recently sent my a great book on Martial Arts, that is mostly excerpts from the writings of Feudal Japans greatest Masters. One of the sections is by a Master of the art in which I am a 4th ranked Black Belt, and paraphrased, he says about battle, that you must practice, over and over, every move you might ever be required to make. In practice, when you move your hand, your mind must occupy your hand. When you move your foot, your mind must occupy your foot. You MUST apply systematic conscious thought to your practice. ...but battle is different. When in battle, you can never let your mind be still... it must be moving and occupy every part of your body. If you allow your mind to be still, you will lose.

I started in Martial Arts when I was 13 years old, and have, off an on, maintained my interest in it all of my life. I am, let's say "adept" at 4 different styles of martial arts, and extremely adept at one... I wish I was as good at pool as I am in physical battle. In martial arts, I have learned to never think. I have practiced so much, using slow regimented actions, that when in battle, I do not think... I only act. I'm a big bulky man, but I can put a finger in an eye at lightening speed without conscious thought. I can do that, because I've practiced this very precise finger strike tens of thousands of times, with a defined target, increasing the speed and refining the size of the target over the years. Just like practicing pool with an aiming system. This book, which may only make sense to those who have practiced martial arts, has shown me that becoming a master at pool is just like becoming a master at a fighting art. I will practice things with precision, regiment and purpose, and when I get in battle on the pool table, I will be able to let go of conscious thought and let it happen. And what will happen to those who play only and don't practice... well, I have a feeling that they'll come to the same end as a Martial Artist who practiced very little then came to the battlefield to challenge a master who knew the value of training the body in order to train the mind.

Did that make sense?

Bob

caedos
11-03-2005, 01:59 PM
I agree. Systems are for analysis. Principles are for performance. A system only has competitive value when it has been absorbed flaws and all to become a set of principles and references on the subconscious level. At that point it is imbedded and 'normal'.

The zen of it is to learn the system, and then to 'forget' the system. The rituals and behaviors created in training will drive new instincts, putting the shooter in the correct reference more often than not.

Sidenote: I watched alot of one-pocket in Vegas when I wasn't playing last week. Has anyone here seen Scott Frost play? Sometimes it looks like his eyes roll up and back as he pulls the trigger and shoots. What a trip! He had a phenomenal run for his last out to win it all (undefeated in matches). Ike Runnels put both Ronnie Allen and James Walden out back to back! Gabe Owen and Scott Frost met twice; the first time they were both going for almost everything to the point of abandoning general one-pocket strategy at times. The second time Gabe tightened up a bit, and Scott smoothed out and caught fire. Greatness. Shannon Daulton came in third in the ten-ball event; as far as I could tell there were some racking issues on both sides and Shannon just happened to come up dry on the break a bit more often in the double hill thriller. A friend of mine named Samm Diepp won the women's singles in the amateur division. She's miles better than she was last year. She and Chisolm Woodson took second in the Scotch Doubles. They won the first set and the second set was a chain of errors that is best forgotten. Great tournament! I hope it continues to grow.


Carl

BigRigTom
11-03-2005, 04:14 PM
Hi Carl,
I just got around to reading you explanation of S.A.M and I wanted to say thank you for clearing up that question.
I have heard that acronym many times and it is nice to know that someone actually can explan it.
You did a fine job IMHO...I think I at least see the gist of it.
Maybe someday ...time and budget allowing...I can go to Texas and learn it from Randy G and the rest in person. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

randyg
11-03-2005, 04:59 PM
Tom: Looks like we may have a school in Ca. Early 2006, still looking for a location. We already have 5 students....SPF-randyg

scottycoyote
11-03-2005, 07:09 PM
hey randy are you going to have the expert class in charlotte in 2006? if so any idea when?

Sid_Vicious
11-04-2005, 07:04 AM
"Well, I don't see where bottom english makes any difference. I use draw, inside, follow, force follow, outside, whatever I need, and it doesn't effect the SAM Aiming at all."

I won't attempt to get into the physics but I'll say that if you take any cut seperated by much of any longer distance of OB to pocket, and apply the SAM system, it works, BUT given any considerable amount of bottom in addition to the aim point WITHOUT conscious or subconscious adjustemnts for the added throw due to the new rotational direction of the CB, will make for a missed shot. I use pure bottom on near straight in shots requiring a tad of throw on those close-clearance obstructing balls, and it works in the positive for that effort. it makes sense to me that just the reverse result will occur while using thw SAM points when you apply bottom in conjunction with the set aim points. I'd like to see the exhibition of the system again where you use the towel to hide the pocket and add in bottom english along with say, 4' of OB-topocket distance. I believe we'd see a breakdown in OB roll path. I am not doubtint that you do indeed have the personal success, but I do wonder if you aren't merely adjusting within yourself due to the years of aiming in conventional ways...sid

pink
11-04-2005, 09:51 AM
My dad is Chan Whitt Sr. I have to say from experience that he is the BEST billiard Instructor ever. If you want to learn what he Knows, he is the person to call and set up instruction.

randyg
11-04-2005, 03:05 PM
Hi Pink: You are so correct. Your Father is a very well known Pool Instructor. I hope some day to attend one of Chan's sessions.....SPF-randyg

randyg
11-04-2005, 03:08 PM
SID:

"Well, I don't see where bottom english makes any difference. I use draw, inside, follow, force follow, outside, whatever I need, and it doesn't effect the SAM Aiming at all."

I won't attempt to get into the physics but I'll say that if you take any cut seperated by much of any longer distance of OB to pocket, and apply the SAM system, it works, BUT given any considerable amount of bottom in addition to the aim point WITHOUT conscious or subconscious adjustemnts for the added throw due to the new rotational direction of the CB, will make for a missed shot. I use pure bottom on near straight in shots requiring a tad of throw on those close-clearance obstructing balls, and it works in the positive for that effort. it makes sense to me that just the reverse result will occur while using thw SAM points when you apply bottom in conjunction with the set aim points. I'd like to see the exhibition of the system again where you use the towel to hide the pocket and add in bottom english along with say, 4' of OB-topocket distance. I believe we'd see a breakdown in OB roll path. I am not doubtint that you do indeed have the personal success, but I do wonder if you aren't merely adjusting within yourself due to the years of aiming in conventional ways...sid

Sorry Sid, bottom spin, top spin, SAM is BOSS. Be glad to demonstrate for you some day....SPF-randyg

Cane
11-04-2005, 03:09 PM
Pink, Your Dad's reputation precedes him in my book. Can you give us more contact information... as an instructor, I'm also a perpetual student of the game.

Thanks
Bob

randyg
11-04-2005, 03:09 PM
SCOTTY: Steve and I are working on it right now...SPF-randyg

MrLucky
05-20-2007, 05:50 AM
I recently took a private lesson from Scott Lee and have to say any concerns I may have had regarding the value of the BCA lessons (at least as far as Cue Tech) are no longer an issue ! I signed up for what I considered my needs and Scott worked primarily on improving mechanics and bad habits that I had developed over the last 40 years or so /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif My position has improved and my speed issues are so much better every one I play has noticed and remarked on my crisper accuracy and smoothness of stroke! I reccomend them to anyone regardless of skill level or years at play.

pooltchr
05-20-2007, 06:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MrLucky:</font><hr> I recently took a private lesson from Scott Lee and have to say any concerns I may have had regarding the value of the BCA lessons (at least as far as Cue Tech) are no longer an issue ! I signed up for what I considered my needs and Scott worked primarily on improving mechanics and bad habits that I had developed over the last 40 years or so /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif My position has improved and my speed issues are so much better every one I play has noticed and remarked on my crisper accuracy and smoothness of stroke! I reccomend them to anyone regardless of skill level or years at play. <hr /></blockquote>

Phil,
Randy, Scott and a few others will be joining me in Charlotte to conduct two classes in October, and advanced level 3 day class, and an expert level 2 day class. You might want to consider coming up for one of them. Scott can probably recommend which class would be best for you since he has personally worked with you.
Steve