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stickman
06-24-2002, 10:31 AM
Recently I rigged up something at home to allow me to shape a new tip on my shaft. It was very crude, but worked well enough to inspire my to try to setup something more permanent. I started with the nylon wheels from a cabinet drawer as a rest for the cue, but found with little pressure these wheels would mark the cue. Then I remembered the pocket lathe sold on Playpool. It has rubber wheels and would be ideal for my project. I have not constructed my home lathe yet, but maybe my concept drawing will spark some discussion and additional ideas.

http://www.geocities.com/stickman32152/

Fred Agnir
06-24-2002, 11:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: stickman:</font><hr> Recently I rigged up something at home to allow me to shape a new tip on my shaft. It was very crude, but worked well enough to inspire my to try to setup something more permanent. I started with the nylon wheels from a cabinet drawer as a rest for the cue, but found with little pressure these wheels would mark the cue. Then I remembered the pocket lathe sold on Playpool. It has rubber wheels and would be ideal for my project. I have not constructed my home lathe yet, but maybe my concept drawing will spark some discussion and additional ideas.

<a target="_blank" href=http://www.geocities.com/stickman32152/>http://www.geocities.com/stickman32152/</a> <hr></blockquote>
The wheels on the Pocket Lathe are machined acrylic, with a groove that holds a standard o-ring (Buna).

I've made a homemade "lathe" of sorts using a fan motor and a drill chuck. I don't think I need the drill chuck (to chuck a lathe pin) as I can use a stiff piece of leather and some rubber bands as a flexible coupling to connect the shaft to the fan shaft. I've seen someone else do this while freehanding the shaft, so I know it works.

Now that you've mentioned using the Pocket Lathe as the suppport, I might as well try that out rather than free-handing it.

Fred

stickman
06-24-2002, 11:34 AM
I thought about using a fan motor with a variable speed foot switch. I've seen some couplers made for this purpose on ebay. They were a set of various size shaft pins with couplers to fit different standard size motor shafts. I would like to construct something fairly inexpensive to clean, burnish, and seal my shaft, and to shape new tips after installing. The pocket lathe will do this, but I'd like to have the shaft power driven so that both my hands are free.

Doctor_D
06-24-2002, 11:39 AM
Good afternoon:

Why not just use a motor from a sewing machine?

Dr. D.

stickman
06-24-2002, 12:02 PM
Another good idea!

Fred Agnir
06-24-2002, 12:08 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: stickman:</font><hr> I thought about using a fan motor with a variable speed foot switch. <hr></blockquote>

I'm not an AC guru, but I think to do this, you'll need to have... let me think... a DC motor with either a rheostat-style footswitch, or a more advanced PWM controller. That is, I don't think you can simply hook up a variable speed footswitch to an AC fan motor. I could be wrong.

In my case, I have a variable speed fan motor, AC. It's a 3-position speed, connecting to 3 individual coil ratios. The plan is to hook up a foot switch for on and off primary (wall outlet) power, but I'd have to manually flick the switch to change speeds.

Fred

Q-guy
06-24-2002, 01:22 PM
I looked at your drawing and it has a problem. Depending what you are trying to do you are better off holding the shaft freehand. Most shafts are not perfectly straight and when you try to support them in a rigid manner they want to jump all over the place. You would be better off just getting a 7/8 crutch bumper, put a 5/16 bolt through the bottom with a nut on the outside. You just pop the end of the shaft in. The ID of the bumper has ribs and is smaller then most shafts and gives you a nice fit. You may use a small leather sleeve or some tape if you want also. Chuck up what you have just made and you are ready to go. You are over completing the thing. From my experience with set ups like yours is, no matter how benign the material may seem. anything that comes into contact with a shaft that is spinning will mark it up. I have seen lots of wheel set ups as steady rests but they never seem to work. I would say the pocket lathe it not designed to handle something spinning at 1000 or 1500 rpms. Because a shaft is so thin it must be spinning at a pretty fast speed to do proper work on it. On a lathe you turn larger diameter stock slower then smaller diameter stock. The same principle as on merry-go-round. You are going faster the farther you move from the center. Just some food for thought.

stickman
06-24-2002, 02:34 PM
Thanks for the input Q-guy. I was thinking that if a person wanted to use it for cleaning, etc. the top clamp would not be practical. I want to keep throwing ideas around until I come up with something that will work. There must be a way to do the things I want to do without having to buy a terribly expensive piece of equipment. The pocket lathe is a great idea, I just would like to take it a step further and motorize it.

Q-guy
06-24-2002, 05:51 PM
One thing you can do that works as a steady rest is a bearing mounted in a block. You need to have a set of sleeves for different size shafts or have it fit close and just use some tape to get the fit. Either way, it won't damage the shaft like something moving independently of the shaft. Variable speed motors such as a sewing machine motor don't work very well at all. They have a big loss of power once you slow them down. You need to have the motor running at full speed. You can change the speeds with a series of pulleys. A motor and arbor is what I am referring to. I have a sewing motor mounted on one of my wood lathes for doing wrapping. I just take off the belt to the big motor and use two 1/4 wide rubber bands to power it. It works great and the rubber bands only cost $2.00 a pound. I also like the idea I can just grab the Irish linen and stop the cue if I want to. It can't get away from me.

stickman
06-24-2002, 08:23 PM
Q-guy, thanks for the ideas. Now I'm thinking of a bearing mounted in a block with a piece of innertube inside of it and the shaft slid in til it's snug. And I can turn it with the crutch tip like you suggested. I was at Walmart tonight and noticed that they had a 3 speed 20" box fan for $11.00.