PDA

View Full Version : Asking For A Spot Opinions



Sid_Vicious
10-23-2005, 09:14 AM
I've had a tendency of playing even and not asking for weight, figuring in a way that the experience is worth the price with several good players, but I wondered..."is there a mindset for those here who gamble for the timing of asking for weight, i.e. a certain lopsided score, or a dollar amount lost that might trigger you to "stubborn-up" and force a spot?" I expect that some answers to this may be, "Well it is an individual, case by case determinant, no set protocol." Still there must be seasoned-to-casual money players here who are not simply trying to rob people, and yet need to keep some resemblance of a more equal chance of winning.

What tells you it's time to ask for a ball or a game on the wire? I am concerned more about semi-friendly wagers, not the serious money situations. What's your general take on the matter???sid

Billy
10-23-2005, 09:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I've had a tendency of playing even and not asking for weight, figuring in a way that the experience is worth the price with several good players, but I wondered..."is there a mindset for those here who gamble for the timing of asking for weight, i.e. a certain lopsided score, or a dollar amount lost that might trigger you to "stubborn-up" and force a spot?" I expect that some answers to this may be, "Well it is an individual, case by case determinant, no set protocol." Still there must be seasoned-to-casual money players here who are not simply trying to rob people, and yet need to keep some resemblance of a more equal chance of winning.

What tells you it's time to ask for a ball or a game on the wire? I am concerned more about semi-friendly wagers, not the serious money situations. What's your general take on the matter???sid <hr /></blockquote>

if you play cheap consider it a good experience and if you continue to lose cheap he might offer you weight

if you really want 'some action' and the opposing player wants to get down for serious moolah then you simply say "I want to play and I want to oblige you with the cash that you want to play for ... but ... I'm sorry but I know you're a better player and I just want a chance.With a handicap [pause] we can get down to doing some business"

the next move is his

jmo

Fran Crimi
10-23-2005, 10:20 AM
As a general rule, if there's a bet on the line, and if he's clearly better than you and he's not offering you a spot, consider it a non-friendly game. He wants to take your money. He may be acting friendly towards you, but he's no friend.

However, there are exceptions, such as someone who normally plays for $100 who agrees to play you for $5. He's willing to offer you the experience for a small fee.

I used to know guys who made a living playing "cheap." They'd go home with an extra $40 or $50 in their pockets every day, taking advantage of the fact that a weaker player will go ahead and "give it a shot" at a tough game because the bet is cheap.

Fran

Snapshot9
10-23-2005, 01:39 PM
This is a burr in my saddle so to speak
because:

1) Spots were usually only offered by a better
player in order to get a game.
2) The more you played for, the more the spot
up to a point. If you aren't going to play for
at least $50 sets, don't ask for a spot. IT was
a risk vs. reward type thing.

Nowdays:
1) Every lower player wants a spot, and usually
the NUTS just to play, even for a $1 a game.
(get real). A lot of them will feed off of this
instead of trying to get better like they should.
Or THEY THINK JUST BECAUSE THEY GOT A SPOT 1 TIME
PLAYING, THAT THEY SHOULD FOREVER AND EVER GET THE
SAME SPOT. (especially after they have gone away
for 6 months and HAVE really improved, and now
think they can beat you, with the same spot, of
course).

If someone wants to 'come up' in the world by
playing you, don't let them do it for $20 sets.
People try all the time to get me to play cheap
sets and get a spot. I simply tell them what I
am willing to do (which is not much under $50 a set),
and what I will do for $100 set and what I will do
for $500 a set. They can accept it or not, I do
not have to play all the time like a lot of young
players feel they have to.

Besides, if a better player is playing that cheap,
it is only to build up his bankroll in order to
play for bigger sets.

I get a little tired of better players being penalized
today for being a better player (with spots, handicaps,
etc..). They put in the time and knowledge to get ahead
in the game, let the lower players pay their dues too.

Vagabond
10-23-2005, 03:40 PM
Hi Sid,
Nothing wrong in asking for the spot.I do not hesitate to ask even my `grand mother` for some weight. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran Crimi
10-23-2005, 04:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Snapshot9:</font><hr> This is a burr in my saddle so to speak
because:

1) Spots were usually only offered by a better
player in order to get a game.
2) The more you played for, the more the spot
up to a point. If you aren't going to play for
at least $50 sets, don't ask for a spot. IT was
a risk vs. reward type thing.

Nowdays:
1) Every lower player wants a spot, and usually
the NUTS just to play, even for a $1 a game.
(get real). A lot of them will feed off of this
instead of trying to get better like they should.
Or THEY THINK JUST BECAUSE THEY GOT A SPOT 1 TIME
PLAYING, THAT THEY SHOULD FOREVER AND EVER GET THE
SAME SPOT. (especially after they have gone away
for 6 months and HAVE really improved, and now
think they can beat you, with the same spot, of
course).

If someone wants to 'come up' in the world by
playing you, don't let them do it for $20 sets.
People try all the time to get me to play cheap
sets and get a spot. I simply tell them what I
am willing to do (which is not much under $50 a set),
and what I will do for $100 set and what I will do
for $500 a set. They can accept it or not, I do
not have to play all the time like a lot of young
players feel they have to.

Besides, if a better player is playing that cheap,
it is only to build up his bankroll in order to
play for bigger sets.

I get a little tired of better players being penalized
today for being a better player (with spots, handicaps,
etc..). They put in the time and knowledge to get ahead
in the game, let the lower players pay their dues too. <hr /></blockquote>

The moral of the story is stay away from nits and don't be a nit yourself. There are nits on both ends of the spectrum, the ones who ask for unreasonable spots for cheap games, and the ones who continually take advantage of your weaker level.

I remember two guys at Chelsea who used to play about same level. Both always played cheap---no more than $10---$20 a set the most. They'd sit around waiting for one of their fish to show up. Whoever spotted the guy first would run up to him and get the game.

Things started to get ridiculous---even comical after awhile. To beat each other to the fish, they started sitting closer and closer to the door, then they'd be standing just inside the door, then outside the door, then even down the corner.

You lose to those type of guys playing even, you'll never see your money again. They don't hang in there when you finally beat them. They're done with you, and they move on to the next fish.

Fran