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Bob_Jewett
10-26-2005, 05:31 PM
I've put up a couple of articles that catalog about two dozen different strokes. See the last two items on http://www.sfbilliards.com/articles/BD_articles.html

Include are the "slip stroke" and the "stroke slip." I hope I got the latter one right as I've never used it myself.

DickLeonard
10-27-2005, 06:16 AM
Bob what does PDF mean [pretty dam foolish] waiting for it to open. The Stroke Slip is that the stroke that Irving Crane used where he would throw the cue and catch it as opposed to Mosconi"s slip stroke.####

Chopstick
10-27-2005, 07:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Bob what does PDF mean [pretty dam foolish] waiting for it to open. The Stroke Slip is that the stroke that Irving Crane used where he would throw the cue and catch it as opposed to Mosconi"s slip stroke.#### <hr /></blockquote>

Portable Document Format. It is an industry standard for interchange of fancy documents. You will need a reader. Just press the download button at this link. It will install a plugin into your browser so you can read these documents. There's lots of things on the internet that are in PDF format. You will find it ot be a useful tool.

Get Acrobat Reader (http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html)

Fran Crimi
10-27-2005, 07:39 AM
Nice articles, Bob.

Two comments:

Stroke Slip: I think this can be further broken down into two types: 1) The natural slipping of the cue after impact as a result of a consistently loose grip pressure throughout the stroke. 2) The intentional throwing and releasing of the cue, with a slight tightening of grip pressure prior to the throw.

Also, I think there is another category of stroke that fits between the pendulum and rail-banger stroke. For lack of a better term, I call it a 'corrective stroke'. This is the stroke most players think of as a 'level' stroke, even though technically, it's not. During this stroke, the player takes action to 'correct' the downward angle of attack due to the pendulum arm position. The result is an angle of attack significantly less than the pendulum attack angle, but not quite level. This is generally accomplished by either back hand manipulation or what I call a "finesse elbow drop," where the elbow is dropped just prior to impact.

Edited comment: stroke slip: If the arm is moving fast enough with a loose grip pressure, there may even be a third type, where due to the speed of the forward motion of the armswing, the cue will slip through the grip just prior to impact.

Fran

pooltchr
10-27-2005, 07:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> what I call a "finesse elbow drop," where the elbow is dropped just prior to impact.



Fran <hr /></blockquote>

Fran...Is this something you teach, or just something you have observed in some of your students??????

Steve

Fran Crimi
10-27-2005, 08:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> what I call a "finesse elbow drop," where the elbow is dropped just prior to impact.



Fran <hr /></blockquote>

Fran...Is this something you teach, or just something you have observed in some of your students??????

Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Study the pros, Steve...Keep an open mind, and experiment. I'd rather just leave it at that. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran

wolfdancer
10-27-2005, 12:43 PM
your articles are always interesting....BUT two? dozen strokes, all from a single lever system..ok, a dual if you add some wrist action?
I had made a breakthrough, of sorts, "buying" into the Monk's four strokes theory. By mentally assigning, a name to my intended stroke, I usually got a somewhat intended, result.
Now it's back to the drawing board, to learn another 20 strokes.
I'm presently reading Ernest Jones's, uncomplicated, 1952 golf instructional book "Swing The Clubhead"
He taught that everything originates in the hands, and the swing would follow. If your hand and finger action was proper, everything else would fall into place...and said "it's not how you feel, it's what you feel"
"Perfection is acheived not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away."
I think that advice could also work for the pool stroke....