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eat_sleep_pool
11-20-2005, 09:40 AM
Lately iv been trying to practice and theres something wrong with my playing, somedays ill do really good and some days ill not hit a freaking ball. I know we all have our bad days, but does anyone have any ideas of how to get over them faster. i have a game comming up that i need to be in shape for and i need the pratcie so some help would be nice. lol
and another thing. i have no idea why this happens but when im going to hit the ball with really low english, this is usually on my bad days, i miscue, now i dont usually do this anyother time, and its the most embarissing thing in the world esspacially after palying for 5 years and still doing it. anyways. post some opinions plz.. thnaks bye

"I need a new shaft, i hit myn too hard"

Snapshot9
11-20-2005, 10:02 AM
Most problems that just 'pop' up occur for 2 reasons:
1) Your form and stroke are not right. You subconciously
are doing something that is not good form (stance/grip) and
henceforth, your 'normal' stroke is not normal anymore.
2) Your mental state of mind is not up to par. If you have
something on your mind not usually there, like a death in the family, breaking up a relationship, your dog died or is sick, finances, or just lonelier than dogsh*t, it can affect
your state of mind and your playing. You need to get past
it whatever it is (Attitude adjustment).

Scott Lee
11-20-2005, 10:46 AM
Odds are 10-1 that it is #1 vs. #2!

Scott Lee

dave
11-21-2005, 01:27 PM
What you have described is one of the major reasons for developing a consistent repeatable pre-shot routine. THEN, when a problem like yours arises, this routine becomes a checklist that you go through, examining each individual step in the process and identifying where the problem lies. Then you can fix it. Without a conscious awareness ot the components of your technique, fixing the problem becomes a matter of guesswork and feel. You can do it this way but it takes a LOT longer. It's also what practice drills are for. You create library of practice drills. Then, when you identify a problem, you have a specific drill designed to focus on and correct that problem. Bangin balls in a pocket just isn't a good enough solution.

Get_A_Grip
11-21-2005, 02:55 PM
If I could offer one additional reason...sleep. Right now I'm shooting very consistent...but the one variable that always affects my shooting ability on a given day is not having gotten enough sleep the night before.

More specifically, if I don't get enough sleep, I notice that my eyes are dryer and can't stayed focused as well on the object ball. This seems to have the most impact on the longer shots--for obvious reasons.

I read a story on Willie Hoppe once that indicated that he always got a real good nights sleep the night before a big match and didn't watch TV or stress his eyes in any way before the match (didn't even practice that morning--if I remembered this correctly).

heater451
11-21-2005, 07:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Snapshot9:</font><hr> Most problems that just 'pop' up occur for 2 reasons:
. . . .<hr /></blockquote>The phrase, "pop up", also describes another common issue--that of jumping up before/during the follow-through of the stroke.

Dropping the grip hand on the stroke, while jumping up at the same time, sometimes occurs as well. I think this is usually the cause of an intended draw-shot becoming a stop-shot instead. And, on the topic of draw, eat_sleep_pool, mentioned miscuing on (low) draw shots. Off hand, I would say that the back hand is being held too high, which may be caused by lifting on the stroke, or simply cueing too jacked up.

As mentioned by dave (North Central, IL), practicing a pre-shot routine will help to alleviate both these, and other issues. Consistency is the key, and correct consistency--even better.

If you start practicing strokes to the cueball, I would recommend practicing every motion as slowly and steadily as possible, and then increasing overall stroke speed a bit. Eventually, speed can be 'flip-flopped', where warm-up strokes are taken fairly quickly, and then the "actual" stroke set is made at completion speed.

Personally, I've never been good at practicing ideal routines. I have usually gone with following what "feels natural", and then adjusting towards what seems to be working best. However, the closest I've ever come to practicing a pre-shot routine pretty much consists of this:

1) Bend down into the shot, being conscious of putting my cue down on the intended shot-line. Normally, I have already decided the spin I want to use, and move the cue tip to the correct area for it.

2) Take three practice strokes, in rapid position, with a short pause at the end. Counting in my head, "1-2-3", then stop. The speed I use here, is about what you would use to knock on a door, or hammer a nail (quickly). The idea is to relax, and loosen up the arm. Also, the final practice backstroke slows down towards the end--kinda like drawing a bow.

3) The pause only lasts about a second, and then I run the "actual" stroke set, slower than the practice ones. The speed of these is more like the beat of a slow-moving freigh train, "klick-clack, klick-clack, klick-clack", with the hit stroke coming on the third forward stroke---which would actually be more like, "klick-clack, klick-clack, klick-". Again, counting helps, "one. . .two. . .threeeeee".

Now, although I mentioned consistency being key, I've found it usually feels better to make my actual hit on the 'two'. So for practice, I start with "one. . .two. . .threeeeee". but when I'm warmer, it's usually just "one. . .twooooo".

I hope this translates alright. . . .



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Stretch
11-22-2005, 10:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Get_A_Grip:</font><hr> If I could offer one additional reason...sleep. Right now I'm shooting very consistent...but the one variable that always affects my shooting ability on a given day is not having gotten enough sleep the night before.

More specifically, if I don't get enough sleep, I notice that my eyes are dryer and can't stayed focused as well on the object ball. This seems to have the most impact on the longer shots--for obvious reasons.

I read a story on Willie Hoppe once that indicated that he always got a real good nights sleep the night before a big match and didn't watch TV or stress his eyes in any way before the match (didn't even practice that morning--if I remembered this correctly). <hr /></blockquote>

Yep getting a good night sleep before a big day is a must. Even if your mechanics, and general approach are fine, if your not mentaly sharp you'll end up shooting yourself into a corner, or missing opportunaties that would make your job easier or save your a$$. Especially in tournaments. It's a long day and any let down useally costs you. So you've got to have those reserves that a good nights sleep gives you.

As for the misscueing. Don't know wuts going on with you there without seeing it. But for me, they are the result of stabbing the cue ball. Because you've introduced an overrideing command to your natural stroke "ie deep draw" your focus now becomes tip placement and you anticipate the hit. Doing that makes for bad contact and throws your rythm off. Result, misscue. Remember, the cue ball just gets in the way of a good stroke. St.