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Acesand8s
11-24-2005, 11:42 AM
What make a cue truley good? <font color="red"> </font color>

randyg
11-24-2005, 11:58 AM
It's handler....SPF-randyg

supergreenman
11-24-2005, 12:05 PM
tap tap tap

pooltchr
11-24-2005, 02:26 PM
I think that pretty much covers it all.

wolfdancer
11-24-2005, 04:06 PM
yeah, but how do you train the damn things? Mine keeps hitting the cue ball into the pockets, and sometimes refuses to pocket Object balls.
I treat it nice, bought a nice warm case for it, clean and polish it regularly, and if it wants a new tip...I get it a good one......no LePros for my Predator...that's like putting firestones on an a Ford Explorer.

Scott Lee
11-24-2005, 04:28 PM
Jack...I thought you KNEW! You have buy the self-adjusting, self-shooting cue. I have one for sale...only $30,000! LOL...and then there's that ocean-front property in western NV!

Scott

BLACKHEART
11-24-2005, 04:47 PM
Since you are a 1st time poster, I assume you were asking a question, that you expected to be answered. I can only answer from my limited point of view. "In my opinion" as a cue maker &amp; player, you should play with the heaviest cue you feel comfortable with. That may be a 17 oz. or for others, that's a 21 oz. Next I think a cue that has a good balance FOR YOU, is one that you will have the most confidence in. Here again if you feel best with a butt heavy cue, then that's the one for you. The most important part of the cue is from the joint to the tip. Look for grin lines in the shaft to run in a fairly straight line from end to end. Shaft tapers very from maker to maker, but if possible hit with a number of them &amp; you will no doubt pick what you like. Unless you are an very experienced player stick with a standard tip size(13mm). As far as tips go they are the only part that will be actually hitting the Q ball. If you are a beginner or just buying your 1st Q then I would recommend a medium or soft tip. Both soft &amp; hard tips have their advantages, but harder tips can present more problems to the less experienced player. Ferrules like tips can affect the softness of hardness of the hit. softer, lighter weight ferrule materials will give you a hit that feels softer, with less deflection. The hit or feel of one of my $300 cues, is the same as one that cost $2000. So if you like costly decorations, then go for it, but know that it won't be "A BETTER CUE". If you need any other help ask, I won't give you a smart ass answer, like others here.GGOD LUCK...JER
P.S. I would caution you, not to buy a cue that is made in a country that has very humid conditions. If you live in a part of the country that has dryer condition you could be asking for problems.

Bob_Jewett
11-24-2005, 08:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Acesand8s:</font><hr> What make a cue truley good? <hr /></blockquote>
Not the things that some think.

The cue needs to be build solidly. It needs to be straight. It needs to be long enough to match your arms and the kinds of strokes you use. It needs to be the right weight for your preference and to some extent the game you are playing. The shaft has a property called "squirt" and it needs to match what you're used to, but until you try to master side spin, don't worry about it. Under personal preference, I'd put shaft diameter and balance point. Ideally the wrap is functional rather than fadish or cosmetic, but many players and cue makers are confused on this point.

And then there is the tip. A bad tip on a good cue will make a lousy combination.

There are house cues that hit the ball as well as any custom cue.

Cueless Joey
11-24-2005, 10:39 PM
Check the used cue market.
If you see some cues commanding high resale value ( from a not dead maker ), that's a telltale sign.
Cues with horrible resale value earned that status ( more often than not ).
IF you see a custom cue commanding high dollar even though they have no inlays or points, most likely they are very good cues .

Rich R.
11-25-2005, 05:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Scott Lee:</font><hr> You have buy the self-adjusting, self-shooting cue. I have one for sale...only $30,000! <hr /></blockquote>
Scott, I have a $1000 bill I will send you as a down payment on that cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Cornerman
11-25-2005, 06:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Acesand8s:</font><hr> What make a cue truley good? <font color="red"> </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

High quality materials, proper wood processing, proper design tolerances, proper fabrication techniques including machining of wood, gluing/bonding, weight &amp; weight balancing, finishing, ...

You can try to play pool with a wet noodle and you can try to play pool with a piece of re-bar. I guarantee that results will have nothing to do with the player. A good quality pool cue will be somewhere in between, but not normally located at WalMart.

Fred

Scott Lee
11-25-2005, 09:17 AM
Rich...No problem! Just include the balance in HUNDREDS! LOL

Scott

Candyman
11-25-2005, 10:50 AM
You've been out bid Rich! I have a crisp new $1,000,000 dollar bill I have been saving for just the right cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Cotton_Seed
11-26-2005, 01:20 AM
Hi Jerry,

Could you explain why it is better to go with a heavier cue? Thanks. I looked at your website...those are some fine looking cues.

Cotton

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> Since you are a 1st time poster, I assume you were asking a question, that you expected to be answered. I can only answer from my limited point of view. "In my opinion" as a cue maker &amp; player, you should play with the heaviest cue you feel comfortable with. That may be a 17 oz. or for others, that's a 21 oz. Next I think a cue that has a good balance FOR YOU, is one that you will have the most confidence in. Here again if you feel best with a butt heavy cue, then that's the one for you. The most important part of the cue is from the joint to the tip. Look for grin lines in the shaft to run in a fairly straight line from end to end. Shaft tapers very from maker to maker, but if possible hit with a number of them &amp; you will no doubt pick what you like. Unless you are an very experienced player stick with a standard tip size(13mm). As far as tips go they are the only part that will be actually hitting the Q ball. If you are a beginner or just buying your 1st Q then I would recommend a medium or soft tip. Both soft &amp; hard tips have their advantages, but harder tips can present more problems to the less experienced player. Ferrules like tips can affect the softness of hardness of the hit. softer, lighter weight ferrule materials will give you a hit that feels softer, with less deflection. The hit or feel of one of my $300 cues, is the same as one that cost $2000. So if you like costly decorations, then go for it, but know that it won't be "A BETTER CUE". If you need any other help ask, I won't give you a smart ass answer, like others here.GGOD LUCK...JER
P.S. I would caution you, not to buy a cue that is made in a country that has very humid conditions. If you live in a part of the country that has dryer condition you could be asking for problems. <hr /></blockquote>

BLACKHEART
11-26-2005, 08:17 AM
I think most everyone has heard, from good players &amp; instructors alike, that the proper arm swing used to hit the cue ball, is a peddulam motion from the elbow down. On long shots I've noticed myself &amp; others seem to hit harder. For a right hander, for instance, this usually means a follow through that goes slightly to the right. This results in outside, unwanted english, imparted to the cue ball. The result is that the cue ball dosn't go where you aimed it &amp; you miss the shot. I find that heavier cues don't need as much extra umph, to get the job done. Therefore the cue ball stays on line better, than the lighter ones. Just some observations from an old man...JER

Cane
11-26-2005, 09:58 AM
Aces&amp;8s,
I'm not a cuemaker, just a user of good cues... and bad cues. Here's my 2 cents, for what it's worth.

When I look a a cue, I look at workmanship, the kinds of woods used (I prefer Massacar [sp] Ebony forearms), even points, Wood to Wood joint (just my preference), and workmanship... oh, I already said that, didn't I. Well, I said that twice because in my experience, if a cuemaker is meticulous about the details work in his cues, then he's probably going to be metciculous about the way it performs.

On the other hand, I have to absolutely agree with RandyG. When I carry my cue case into a room, I usually have somewhere in the neighborhood of $6000 in my hand, BUT, I hardly ever bring those cues out to practice. I just grab whatever is closest to my home table when it's time to practice or play the ghost, or whatever. It's usually a 19 oz Lucasi house cue that I salvaged when we closed our pool room. Sometimes it's my stepdaugher's Ugly Action cue with the odd black stains on the "not so straight" shaft. I don't care, to a certain extent, what I practice with, as long as my practice is quality. I can beat the ghost regularly with that old Lucasi house cue. It's not straight, has dings on the shaft, has a LePro tip on it and stays leaned up against the wall in the corner.

What I'm saying is YES, a good cuemaker can make a quality cue that makes playing easier and more enjoyable, BUT a good cueist can make balls with a broomstick if he knows how to use it.

So, what makes the cue good? Everyone was right... it's quality, workmanship, nice finish, nice hit, AND a player that knows what to do with the package.

Later,
Bob

PS: wouldn't give up my custom cues for anything in the world, but have walked into many a pool room and won sets with a crooked bar cue.