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ainfantino
12-01-2005, 03:58 PM
I am having a new home built and am planning on placing a 9 ft pool table in my walk-up finished attic. Does anyone know if I should be concerned about whether the floor can support the weight of the table? Do I need to reinforce it? thanks!

Rich R.
12-01-2005, 07:07 PM
I don't know about the floor, but I hope your back is supported, when you carry the pieces of slate up to the attic. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

In my non-professional opinion, since you are in the construction process, I would add the extra support now. It's a lot easier now, than it will be later, if you find that you need it.
Also, IMHO, the extra support will take out some of the bounce that is natural to most floors.

iacas
12-01-2005, 10:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ainfantino:</font><hr> I am having a new home built and am planning on placing a 9 ft pool table in my walk-up finished attic. Does anyone know if I should be concerned about whether the floor can support the weight of the table? Do I need to reinforce it? thanks! <hr /></blockquote>

I'm putting a room in over my garage, and as one builder today put it:

"Pool table, 45 square feet, 800 lbs. That's under 20 lbs/square feet. Your feet are about a foot big, and you weigh 180 lbs. You do the math."

It made sense to me, and I hope that in retelling it, it makes sense to you.

Billy_Bob
12-02-2005, 12:18 AM
When I first read the subject of this thread, I pictured one of those pull down access hatches to get up into the attic!

From what I have read, if you can stand several heavy guys on the floor just like you were having a party or whatever, then the floor would be fine. I read that most floors are OK in that respect.

Might want to check with an architect. Or if you know the size of the joists, spacing, and length, weight of table, size and number of legs, thickness of floor and material, you can ask on Usenet (google.com groups) group alt.building.construction or alt.home.repair

By the way, I will be out of town when you need help dragging it up there as I'm sure will be every one else here. I had a hard enough time getting my table into my garage! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

ALLENJK
12-02-2005, 05:53 AM
Talk to your builder , most attic areas are not designed to the same specifications as the upstairs floor in the living areas.

SPetty
12-02-2005, 06:06 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote iacas:</font><hr>I'm putting a room in over my garage, and as one builder today put it:

"Pool table, 45 square feet, 800 lbs. That's under 20 lbs/square feet. Your feet are about a foot big, and you weigh 180 lbs. You do the math."

It made sense to me, and I hope that in retelling it, it makes sense to you. <hr /></blockquote>It doesn't make sense to me - I'd get a new builder quick!
Assuming 800 pounds is correct...

My Diamond Pro sits on four legs, so each leg would take 200 pounds.

Each leg has an approximately 4 inch diameter circle foot. Let's see, pi R squared... That's about 12.56636 square inches to support 200 pounds...

Converting that to a square foot measurement - there are 144 square inches to the square foot, so I'd put it more like 2290 pounds per square foot... But you've only got 13 square inches of it...

It's a bigger deal than your builder is saying to make sure you have proper sub-structure for a pool table - it's not just like having four guys standing there...

iacas
12-02-2005, 06:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr>It doesn't make sense to me - I'd get a new builder quick!
Assuming 800 pounds is correct...

My Diamond Pro sits on four legs, so each leg would take 200 pounds.

Each leg has an approximately 4 inch diameter circle foot. Let's see, pi R squared... That's about 12.56636 square inches to support 200 pounds...

Converting that to a square foot measurement - there are 144 square inches to the square foot, so I'd put it more like 2290 pounds per square foot... But you've only got 13 square inches of it...

It's a bigger deal than your builder is saying to make sure you have proper sub-structure for a pool table - it's not just like having four guys standing there... <hr /></blockquote>

Actually, it's not. The purpose of the subfloor and supports/joists is to distribute the weight and load over a larger area.

It does this regardless of whether it's a person or 200 lbs coming down on a table leg. A properly engineered subfloor will hold quite a helluva lot of weight.

By all means consult a builder and all, but it's unlikely you have anything to worry about. If you feel safe jumping - which minimizes the ability to distribute the load) and you weigh more than 150 lbs. - your floor is fine.

Rangercap
12-02-2005, 10:32 AM
You biggest issue may be the span of the joists in your attic/garage. If you have a long span, the additional weight won't be an issue, but deflection may be. If you have a two car garage with a clear open span, say a 20 foot span, installing a pool table above it, say 1000 lbs, you may notice when you walk around the floor may seem to shake more. If you were to support the span in the middle, by installing a column and a simple beam, you will reduce the span, a cut the amount of deflection your feel when you walk around. It may not be a matter of structural support, but a simple matter of comfort. As for the attic, since the attic space was not intended for inhabitant, the amount of 'shake' you feel when you walk around may be more noticable then on the floors below.

brian

iacas
12-02-2005, 10:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rangercap:</font><hr> You biggest issue may be the span of the joists in your attic/garage. If you have a long span, the additional weight won't be an issue, but deflection may be. If you have a two car garage with a clear open span, say a 20 foot span, installing a pool table above it, say 1000 lbs, you may notice when you walk around the floor may seem to shake more. If you were to support the span in the middle, by installing a column and a simple beam, you will reduce the span, a cut the amount of deflection your feel when you walk around. It may not be a matter of structural support, but a simple matter of comfort. As for the attic, since the attic space was not intended for inhabitant, the amount of 'shake' you feel when you walk around may be more noticable then on the floors below.<hr /></blockquote>

Indeed, that's the main issue. The room above my garage is basically a "bonus room" so we're okay there. Worst case, they'll install a beam in the garage to ease the span and provide more support and less bounce.

Attics typically aren't built for anything more than light storage, and you'll probably find a lot of trusses and framework to hold up the roof that you'll be cutting as well.

It's possible, especially since over an attic you probably don't have large wall-less spans, but they'll have to beef up the floors to 2x10s or something and find new ways to support the roof.

caedos
12-02-2005, 11:14 AM
I like what's been said about the framing... Your architect and builder should be able to handle the load requirements with the right headers/trusses/beams/etc... You may also want to check with your insurance agency about this. If the house isn't rated for the weight (to insurance company standards, not the builder's standards) your homeowners policy may get an exception or two added (not good).



c

PeteW
12-02-2005, 10:00 PM
I framed houses for a number of years and every house I built that had a bonus room above the garage had full fledged floor joists. Since the house is being built and you are putting a room up there from the start you will not have rafters (roof trusses) forming the ceiling of the garage, you will most likely have big beefy manufactured floor joists with 3/4 or 7/8 inch subfloor depending on your homes luxury level.
This floor system should have no trouble supporting a pool table without rebound problems.

tjlmbklr
12-03-2005, 07:27 PM
Some may remember my story. I did convert my attic in my 106 year old house into a Rec. room. I have load baring wall that runs down the center of my floor. I did say that I would post pictures on this forum when I am finished. I still have the bar to build and trim out the windows and doors. The floor does have a little bounce to it, but I am not conserned at all of it not being able to support the wieght. Can anyone tell me how to post pictures in a Thread. i want them to be viewed on the same page as the post and I am not sure how to do this.

SPetty
12-04-2005, 06:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tjlmbklr:</font><hr> Can anyone tell me how to post pictures in a Thread.<hr /></blockquote>Click the FAQ link at the bottom of the page. It'll tell you all you need to know.