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Cotton_Seed
12-09-2005, 06:32 PM
Hello everyone. Although I've been playing casually for about six years, I'm essentially a beginner, and I was wondering if you guys could suggest some drills to help with stroke mechanics. I'm interested in getting better, and I hear that mechanics is a good place to start.

thank you,
Cotton

Bob_Jewett
12-09-2005, 06:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cotton_Seed:</font><hr> Hello everyone. Although I've been playing casually for about six years, I'm essentially a beginner, and I was wondering if you guys could suggest some drills to help with stroke mechanics. I'm interested in getting better, and I hear that mechanics is a good place to start.... <hr /></blockquote>
The problem is that it is very difficult to self-assess your mechanics. There are lots of standard basic drills that help to test for obvious flaws, but if you have picked up some bad habit, such as lifting your bridge hand before hitting the cue ball or a hundred other possible problems, and have practiced that bad habit, it will be hard or impossible for you to see it on your own. Can you video tape yourself while shooting?

About 20 basic drills are available for free in the Basics Clinic handout at http://www.sfbilliards.com If you get those drills, let us know how you do on the level 2 progressive practice drills (2A to 2D, page 9).

pooltchr
12-10-2005, 07:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr>
The problem is that it is very difficult to self-assess your mechanics. <hr /></blockquote>

Bob, I'm surprised to hear you say this. The first time I attended pool school, after 3 days, I had been given some very good tools for self-evaluation of my mechanics. I am able, for the most part, to know exactly what went wrong when I miss a shot. It's not that difficult, but you do need to know what to look for, and what it means when you see it.
Steve

Cane
12-10-2005, 08:32 AM
Steve, Bob... I'm going in between. It's hard to assess your mechanics without good guidance or instruction! *S*

Later,
Bob &gt;&gt;&gt;Sitting on the fence!

pooltchr
12-10-2005, 08:58 AM
Bob,
I agree. That's why I qualified my statement by adding it is not difficult <font color="red"> If you know what to look for and what it means. Something you can learn from a good instructor. </font color>
Steve

Billy_Bob
12-10-2005, 11:03 AM
Here are a few basics, some of which require *extreme* accuracy...

http://www.geocities.com/billybobnospam/basic_daily_practice.html

mworkman
12-10-2005, 12:56 PM
I've always had trouble with an inconsistant stroke for years because I've never worked on it much. Untill now. I work on it almost every day. Draw a straight line in pencil on your pool table (if you have one). Do about 75 strokes with various bridges, then set up long straight in shots (9) and shoot them in. I do three sets for a total of about 225 strokes and 27 balls. This is the first thing I do every day I practice and it only takes about 15 minutes. Try to get a perfect stop shot with no movement on the cueball. Work on your preshot routine also while shooting these straight in shots. I've been doing this for less then a year, and I miss a lot less now. Also, a friend of mine commented on how fluid and smooth my stroke is now. I feel more confident in the long tough shots because I know my stroke is straight. Good luck and stick with it for a long time and it will pay off. You should work on your stroke at least a little durring every practice session.

Cane
12-10-2005, 06:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> You should work on your stroke at least a little durring every practice session. <hr /></blockquote>

I ABSOLUTELY agree with this. I've been playing since the Rocky Mountains were just prairies and I still do about 10 to 15 minutes of a stroke drill EVERY DAY.

Now, I do, however disagree (you didn't think I could post and be all positive, did you? LOL) that it takes a long time to develop a great stroke. A great stroke can be taught, and it you know exactly how to practice it, it can be perfected and burned into your game in a VERY short time. But you still have to practice it, just like you do everything else that's important to your game.

Later,
Bob

Later,
Bob

randyg
12-10-2005, 06:38 PM
Right on CANEMAN.

LEARNING-RETENTION-PERFORMANCE.

I have watched CANEMAN teach a perfect stroke in one hour, watch his student retain that stroke for three days. Now it's the students turn to PERFORM.....SPF-randyg

Cotton_Seed
12-11-2005, 02:28 AM
Thanks everyone for the good suggestions and drills. I will try them out next time I go to the pool hall. I don't have a way to videotape myself...I guess that would be ideal though. The room owner is a good player and I hear he likes to give pointers, so maybe I can get him to watch me hit some.