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View Full Version : 9-ball break - Head spot vs 1 D back?



Billy_Bob
12-11-2005, 09:59 AM
I played 9-ball last night and did a lot of breaking (getting back up to speed after my summer break). I was experimenting with breaking with the cue ball on the head spot (center of table, second diamond) and my breaks were quite different from my usual breaking spot of 1 diamond back from the head spot.

It seemed as though my breaks (when the cue ball is on the head spot) are more powerful and more consistent than when I break with the cue ball 1 diamond back from that spot.

With about 5 breaks in a row (head spot), I was able to get the 9-ball to travel the same exact direction with each break (toward right corner pocket - once into pocket), but slightly different distances each time, using different breaking speeds.

Why are my breaks so different? In both cases the cue ball is center table except for being 1 diamond distance back/forward.

When breaking 1 diamond back from the head spot, my breaks are very inconsistant. For this break I am standing more upright and for a bridge I place an upside down "peace sign" over the top of the cushion, and cue shaft rests on cushion. 10 or 11 inch bridge. Break with center draw. (9 ball will go different directions with each break!)

For the more consistant head spot breaks, I am using a closed 10 inch bridge, bending down lower, and break with center draw. (9 ball goes same direction with each break.)

Billy_Bob
12-11-2005, 10:10 AM
I just checked and my cue is more "level" when breaking on the head spot since the cue ball is 1 diamond further away from the rail. So I don't know if that is a factor?

Snapshot9
12-11-2005, 12:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> I just checked and my cue is more "level" when breaking on the head spot since the cue ball is 1 diamond further away from the rail. So I don't know if that is a factor?
<hr /></blockquote>

Billy ... Even though you might think it is the same, it is not. Why? because breaking from the rail a player has the
cue ball further out front than breaking with bridge hand
on the table, and when you follow through when breaking,
the cue has a tendency to vary, which results in inconsistency of break, and inaccuracy of break. Even you are having problems with your break, it is better to shorten your bridge by about an 1" at a time until you are accurate, and getting consistency in your break plus making a ball on the break. The tradoff is power. It does noone any good to break well and never make a ball because enough power isn't there, so you also have to notice any power drop offs when
bridging closer and decide on a happy medium.

pooltchr
12-11-2005, 02:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> but slightly different distances each time, using different breaking speeds.

<hr /></blockquote>

When you are experimenting, I would suggest only allowing one variable to change at a time. Break from the same spot with different speeds and see the differences. If you are going to change the spot where you break from, keep the same speed. This way, you know both the cause and effect.
Just a suggestion.
Steve

ceebee
12-11-2005, 03:00 PM
The difference in the distances, from the cue ball to lead ball, may have something to do with your breaking results. Rememember Earl getting his Mosconi Cup Team to change their cue ball location, by backing it away from the Head String, (on their break shots) so the cue ball would be on the table, at impact with the rack.

If you are attempting to hit the Cue Ball, just a skosh above center, the farther the Cue Ball is from the rail, the more level the Cue can be stroked. The more level your stroke is, the less your cue ball will hop to the rack.

Good Luck &amp; Merry Christmas

Chopstick
12-12-2005, 02:38 AM
It's the distance. Just like with draw shots. Try moving the cue ball one diamond forward of the head spot and break from there. You will see a big difference.

PHJ314
12-12-2005, 07:49 AM
My main place to break from is on the right side of the table about an inch off the rail on the second diamond(the most common place to break from in 9-ball), most of my weight is on my front foot when setting up, and I'm more up-right than crouched down, I try to hit the cue ball just slightly below center(1/4 tip maybe), I use a loose grip and snap my wrist through contact and concentrate on a fluid follow through, I usually have a lot of success pocketing a ball and leaving the cue ball close to the middle of the table(unless it gets kicked by another ball).

If my break if off from that point I'll try the cut break, pretty much the same thing but I come accross the 1 ball, forcing the cue ball to the left rail, if hit properly the cue ball will come back accross table and hit the pack a second time(chance of even kicking the 9 ball in.

If that position isn't working I'll shift over to the opposite side of the table on position and try my breaks from there.

My 3rd point to break from (this is a break my friend has mastered and I'm currently working on....he always gets the 9 ball moving toward the left corner pocket, and makes it quite often actually, which drives me bonkers). Put the cue ball in line with the first diamond on the end rail and the first diamond on the side rail. Now my friend says he hits it with the slightest of top left. I myself have been just trying to make a solid contact with mid or slightly below mid ball, and have been making balls fairly regualrly, this is still WIP progress for me, but this break really gets the 9-ball moving!

I'm not a very big guy and I've found that these breaks allow me to generate my maximum power on the break with relative success of pocketing a ball and maintaining control of the cue ball. Anyway, these are the positions I use that are comfortable for me and have given me the greatest deal of success, I'm not saying they'll work for you.

BTW...Dont' be afraid to practice your break, it's said by many to be the most important shot in 9-ball!

Best of luck!

Chopstick
12-12-2005, 10:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote PHJ314:</font><hr>
My 3rd point to break from (this is a break my friend has mastered and I'm currently working on....he always gets the 9 ball moving toward the left corner pocket, and makes it quite often actually, which drives me bonkers). Put the cue ball in line with the first diamond on the end rail and the first diamond on the side rail. Now my friend says he hits it with the slightest of top left. I myself have been just trying to make a solid contact with mid or slightly below mid ball, and have been making balls fairly regualrly, this is still WIP progress for me, but this break really gets the 9-ball moving!

<hr /></blockquote>

This is the break I use. I feel like the touch of inside make the cue ball bite into the head ball a little more. The touch of top is to keep the cueball from bouncing back off the rack. The rack weighs nine times more that the cue ball. If you don't use some follow it's just going to bounce right back to you.

About the nine ball, what your friend isn't telling you, or may not know is to look for cracks on one side of the lower part of the rack. They don't have to be large. The width of a peice of paper of less. Break from the opposite side and the nine ball will come out through the cracked side.

Ceebee wrote the best book on this subject. You should give it a read some time.

Billy_Bob
12-12-2005, 11:50 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> ...Try moving the cue ball one diamond forward of the head spot and break from there. You will see a big difference. <hr /></blockquote>

What an excellent suggestion!

This has got to be the best tip of the year! What a good way to see the exaggerated effects of a closer or further away CB for a break. (And then to better understand what is going on). Thanks!

P.S. I do have racking secrets, etc. and do break from other positions, I'm just working on this specific break right now.

PHJ314
12-12-2005, 12:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote PHJ314:</font><hr>
My 3rd point to break from (this is a break my friend has mastered and I'm currently working on....he always gets the 9 ball moving toward the left corner pocket, and makes it quite often actually, which drives me bonkers). Put the cue ball in line with the first diamond on the end rail and the first diamond on the side rail. Now my friend says he hits it with the slightest of top left. I myself have been just trying to make a solid contact with mid or slightly below mid ball, and have been making balls fairly regualrly, this is still WIP progress for me, but this break really gets the 9-ball moving!

<hr /></blockquote>

This is the break I use. I feel like the touch of inside make the cue ball bite into the head ball a little more. The touch of top is to keep the cueball from bouncing back off the rack. The rack weighs nine times more that the cue ball. If you don't use some follow it's just going to bounce right back to you.

About the nine ball, what your friend isn't telling you, or may not know is to look for cracks on one side of the lower part of the rack. They don't have to be large. The width of a peice of paper of less. Break from the opposite side and the nine ball will come out through the cracked side.

Ceebee wrote the best book on this subject. You should give it a read some time. <hr /></blockquote>

Thanks chopstick, well aware of looking for that crack in the rack, I either read that from 'Byrne's Standard book of pool and billiards', or from 'Play your Best Nine ball'(Phil Chapelle). That is a very good tip and it does work quite well! If I'm not mistaken though, should there be any additional cracks amongst the top 3 balls, the break would be largely ineffective(Though no rack should ever be that loose).

Another tip I read, by placing the rack just below the spot, you'll inrease the chances of making the wing ball, having a rack above the spot decreases the chance of making the wing ball.