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View Full Version : Sealing and leveling my first slate table.



netsomnia2
12-27-2005, 10:48 AM
Hello Everyone,

I bought our first slate pool table as a family gift. Unfortunately, this Westwood pool table needs a lot of work. I think the table fream and supporting beams are worth $500 alone and that's what I paid for the whole table with slate, cues, cloth, clock, et cetera.

I am not a table mechanic by trade but I am stubborn (stupid?) enough to tackle most 'do-it-yourself' projects. The general public opinion in the newsgroups is that pool table leveling is not a 'do-it-yourself' project, however, I beg to differ because many home projects at the same level of difficulty have been tackled by the novice homeowner.

I leveled the three pieces of slate and tested with a ball to our satisfaction. The next step is to fill in chips and low spots on the table. One particular spot has the same characteristics as a farm pond in the Midwest. The ball actually does a few complete circles before resting in the center.

I thought to myself, "This is going to be fun!". Durham's website does not recommend rock hard water putty for surface repairs - they only recommend rock hard water putty for recessed area like a screw hole on a table.

Does this leave me with Bondo to fill the shallow 'pond' area? I can't see filling this with bees wax but if someone knows this will work with wax, I want to know the best way to shape the wax flat with the slate.

I look foward to all ideas and sharing of knowledge.

Cornerman
12-27-2005, 11:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote netsomnia2:</font><hr>
I am not a table mechanic by trade but I am stubborn (stupid?) enough to tackle most 'do-it-yourself' projects. The general public opinion in the newsgroups is that pool table leveling is not a 'do-it-yourself' project, however, I beg to differ because many home projects at the same level of difficulty have been tackled by the novice homeowner. <hr /></blockquote> I think the same way. I'm a weekend warrior, and take pride in doing a lot of home projects. I fix most things on my vehicles that I can, plumbing, and minor carpentry. If someone isn't handy, I definitely recommend getting a professional mechanic.


[ QUOTE ]
One particular spot has the same characteristics as a farm pond in the Midwest. The ball actually does a few complete circles before resting in the center.<hr /></blockquote>

If it's shallow enough, I've had success with beeswax. My slate has several imperfections that I simply put the beeswax down, melted it, and scraped it level. Hopefully, a real table mechanic can give you the best solution.

Fred

netsomnia2
12-27-2005, 11:18 AM
Fred: Thanks for the reply. The depth of the 'pond' is ~ 1/32".

wolfdancer
12-27-2005, 01:54 PM
I've worked with one of the top table guys in the country, a few hundred tables....and seen him repair everything from chipped, and cracked to broken slate.
Be uses Beeswax for the seams, Water putty for the screw holes
and Bondo for everything else.
And another top mechanic/player/ all around good guy...Ernesto Dominquez doesn't use beeswax at all....bondo's the seams instead.
If you got the slates level....no easy trick....you have the hard part out of your way.
What's a fream?