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Drop1
12-28-2005, 08:41 PM
I found my spot play on 9" tables...cost $1.27 an hour. Not a bad place,the counter lady looks a little like Ernest Borgnine in drag. But the tables are not bad,and all slate,with a decent cloth,and rails....good old Guadalajara.

CaptainHook
12-29-2005, 06:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> I found my spot play on 9" tables...cost $1.27 an hour. Not a bad place,the counter lady looks a little like Ernest Borgnine in drag. But the tables are not bad,and all slate,with a decent cloth,and rails....good old Guadalajara. <hr /></blockquote>


I also like to keep my cost of playing to a reasonable amount. I play on a Gold Crown in the front room of a local bar on what they call the club table. It is $20.00
a month and you can use it as much as you want. In the back room there is 2 bar box tables that most of the regulars play on for .50 a game. Any given month there are only about 7 or 8 of us that use the 9 footer. The local Pool halls run around anywhere from $3.50 to $6.50 per hour, per player. /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

iacas
12-29-2005, 11:33 AM
Rates here are anywhere from $4/player*hour down to $2.50 or so if you have four players.

But my cost of play (in about a month) is about $25,000 - that's the cost of the table, the addition, and the new a/c and furnace we're adding to my house. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Rich R.
12-30-2005, 07:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote iacas:</font><hr> But my cost of play (in about a month) is about $25,000 - that's the cost of the table, the addition, and the new a/c and furnace we're adding to my house. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>From my experience, you are getting away cheap. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

walt8880
01-17-2006, 07:49 PM
Believe it or not, the cost of play in Shanghai on pool or snooker tables is equivalent to $3-4 US per hour.

Pool halls are crowded in this country where people supposedly have no money.

Go figure.

Drop1
01-17-2006, 08:56 PM
Cost me more than that in Hong Kong. Most of the players were from India..young guys. I have to say I never saw a 12'table until then. The "Color of Money" had just been out for a few months,and Nine Ball was the game of choice.

SpiderMan
01-17-2006, 09:52 PM
It had better be cheap, with tables less than a foot long /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> I found my spot play on 9" tables...cost $1.27 an hour. Not a bad place,the counter lady looks a little like Ernest Borgnine in drag. But the tables are not bad,and all slate,with a decent cloth,and rails....good old Guadalajara. <hr /></blockquote>

The_Doctor
01-18-2006, 04:08 AM
In the UK we dream of playing for that little cash. The only club within 50 miles of where I live that has 9' tables charges 7.00 per hour (about 12.3748 USD). No one can afford to practice more than once a week. Pool is played by large groups of people around one table who want to get drunk and theres no way these people could play snooker while drinking because they would never get a ball in, they make two balls in a row on a 9' table and think they are the bee's knees. Snooker often costs much less to play than pool. Theres only a few ways to practice a lot over here. Either
- be very rich (in which case you're working all the time to make said money and don't have time to practice)
- be very good and get your local club to sponsor you with free play (chicken &amp; egg syndrome I think)
- get a part time job in a pool hall (my choice)
- get your own table (with property prices like they are if you have a house big enough then you fit into the first category)

I hope I don't appear to be making excuses for the UK's lack of good players, I really just wanted to rant. I often like to rant about a certain large chain of snooker / pool halls in the UK which puts smaller clubs out of business &amp; then charges the high prices. They do appear to be killing pool as a sport in this country before its really had a chance to live.

SpiderMan
01-18-2006, 06:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote The_Doctor:</font><hr> In the UK we dream of playing for that little cash. The only club within 50 miles of where I live that has 9' tables charges 7.00 per hour (about 12.3748 USD). No one can afford to practice more than once a week. Pool is played by large groups of people around one table who want to get drunk and theres no way these people could play snooker while drinking because they would never get a ball in, they make two balls in a row on a 9' table and think they are the bee's knees. Snooker often costs much less to play than pool. <hr /></blockquote>

$12 an hour is pretty high, but not completely off-base from "prime time" rates at a lot of big-city establishments in the US. You said snooker is much cheaper than pool - how much is snooker? Over here, the opposite would be true, because the tables take up more room and are usually less common.

SpiderMan

The_Doctor
01-18-2006, 08:35 AM
The difference between snooker and pool over here is that there are lots of privately run snooker clubs where you can pay between 1.00 to a maximum of 5.00 an hour in an expensive club ($1.7 - $8.8). Pool, however, is only really found in Riley's clubs and a few others that are riley's clubs under different brand names. Some of these clubs are snooker clubs with a pool table in the corner and those places are ok but you still find that the pool table is the domain of the drunk fools. There are other Riley's clubs that have a lot of pool tables, but these places often resemble a night club with pool tables in the way. The bar is the main source of income and the people don't come to practice they come to drink and have a laugh while doing so. This means that Riley's can charge over the odds for pool. The people playing pool don't know any better and stump up the money, but the people playing snooker are much more likely to be enthusiasts and would never pay such high prices. They also have options to go to other places as there are many snooker clubs but the pool player is limited.

Snooker tables certainly cost more to buy and need constant brushing and ironing whereas a common process when collecting a set of pool balls from the counter is to ask for a table brush as well, because you know that you arn't going to want to put even your hand on the table until you've cleaned it yourself. So its not that we pay under the odds for snooker, we just have to pay a premium price for even the worst kept pool tables.

I have found the occasional pool club that is run for the love of cuesports and not cash. They still charge a lot for the table but if you're playing on your own you get half price.

I appologise to any quality pool halls in the UK for painting a bad picture but you guys really do appear to be the exception.

Rant over, thanks for listening, if anyone got this far through the post then they diserve a medal.

Andy.

SpiderMan
01-18-2006, 11:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote The_Doctor:</font><hr> The difference between snooker and pool over here is that there are lots of privately run snooker clubs where you can pay between 1.00 to a maximum of 5.00 an hour in an expensive club ($1.7 - $8.8). <hr /></blockquote>

Andy,

Is that really the true total cost though, or is there a membership fee to be paid in addition? I assume the "Rileys" places you mention are public houses with no additional fees other than table rent.

I played a few times in the snooker club in Bedford, and you had to be a paid member (or guest of one) to use the tables. Actually, it seemed a little bit cloak-and-dagger .... you rang a doorbell, and they had to unlock the door for you after identification.

The "pool" we played in public houses was a really strange game. It was sort of like 8-ball in that there were two groups, but the balls were not numbered. Also, I believe they were smaller than over here, maybe only 2" or so diameter. And there were some odd rules, such as the opponent getting two free shots after a foul. But they called the game "pool".

BTW, all this was in 1991.

SpiderMan

The_Doctor
01-18-2006, 06:38 PM
It is pretty much the cost of playing. Most clubs do charge a membership fee including the Riley's but the difference is in how discerning the clubs are over who they let join. Riley's have taken cue sports in this country out of the coat an dagger world (which is just like you describe) an made it much more accessible to everyday people who were put off by the seedy world that a lot of snooker clubs still represent.

A typical club will charge between 5 &amp; 10 ($8.8 - $17.6) to join for the year and for that you get access to the club an more often than not you can bring in guests. Riley's will let anyone join at pretty much any time of the day or night but other clubs will not. I have been to clubs where all new members must fill in an application form which is then submitted to the annual general meeting (only once a year). The application will be displayed on the club notice board for at least one month prior to the meeting allowing any current members to object to the application. The application will then be approved or denied at the meeting (if you hand in your application after the meeting you have to wait another year to join).
That is an extreme example, but most clubs work on a continuum between this and the Riley's method. Generally a club will only allow people in who are members or as a guest of a member. Most clubs do run a locked door policy whereby you would have to show your membership card at the door and then be let in.

Snooker clubs tend to be very large rooms above warehouses and other industrial buildings, so what you are left with is a secluded door (locked) in what would appear to be the middle of nowhere with a buzzer to let people in, usually many flights of stairs and then a very dark room lit only by the table lights.

This is obviously very daunting to most people so the situation often arises where friends of members are the only new members.

Snooker can be very cheap to play over here if a player shops around, however it does appear that the more strict the membership policy the cheaper the table play.

If you ask a guy from the UK about pool they will assume that you mean a game played on a 6' by 3' table with rounded pockets like on a snooker table, the balls are 2", 7 yellow, 7 red and a black. The aim of the game is simply to pot all of one colour and then the black. The big diffence in the rules between this and 8 ball as you would play is the foul rule as you point out. If a foul is made your opponent doesn't take cue ball in hand but has two visits to the table before your next. It is a game that is played with very little power as the pockets don't accept shots with much force and the big skill of the game is the order which the balls are taken &amp; very precise speed control. The rack tends to get very congested with seven of your opponents balls on such a small table and often a player is playing for a positional window of 1" - 2". Clusters also represent a problem as it is difficult to make balls with much force to open the cluster. The normal tactic is to play for angles which allow single balls to be flicked out of clusters one at a time.

We refer to this game as pool and the game which you are more familiar with as American pool. Pool is the most popular game by a long way in this country as it is accessible to everyone, most public houses have a English pool table because they don't take up much space. In addition to this most pubs have an English pool team which will compete once or twice a week. I have never seen a team for an American pool league over here. There are very few American pool competitions, mainly just the "pro tour" which is far too expensive to play in for a players first tournament. Its around $80 to enter one round if you are a regular in the club that it is being played. Otherwise its necessary to join the pro tour which is several hundred dollars and then $80 per tournament. I realise this is not a great lot compared to the tournaments that I read about in the states but when its that or nothing it doesn't make the sport very accessible to the new comer. Especially not when an english pool league costs about $10.00 for around 30 matches (including food an all table play at the matches)right up to the leagues where the professionals play.

I hope that was a bit of an insight into the cliquey world of british cue sports and wasn't too long an dull.

Andy.

p.s. snooker is played by people in dinner jackets, considering where these guys learnt to play, what is a bit of a back street game, I find this very strange.

tdurden87
01-18-2006, 08:28 PM
Most pool halls around me, in Tampa, are about 4 dollars per player per hour. However there is a place called Splitsville that charges $12 an hour. From what I've heard though, playing at the USF student union is free.

jimbojim
04-28-2006, 10:18 PM
where I play from 9am to 5pm its, 6$CAN/hour regardless of the amount of players and 5h01pm to 3am, its 10,50$CAN/hour but they give me 50% discount on the price at all times. It comes cheap when you bring some friend and decide to split the price. I usually play with my pool pal almost everyday and we usually play for about 4 hours(after 5pm though) that makes 41$+ discount=20,50...split in 2=10.50

about 2.63$CAN/hour(after 5pm)each when I play with a friend