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Drop1
12-31-2005, 09:33 PM
I watched a few videos of Dr.Dave demonstrate how to draw the cue ball back. It seemed at the end of his stroke,after shooting, the tip of his cue was slightly down. I always hear level,and follow through,and always shot each shot the same. Is the draw shot different?

SpiderMan
12-31-2005, 09:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> I watched a few videos of Dr.Dave demonstrate how to draw the cue ball back. It seemed at the end of his stroke,after shooting, the tip of his cue was slightly down. I always hear level,and follow through,and always shot each shot the same. Is the draw shot different? <hr /></blockquote>

Some of the things you hear over and over must be taken with a slight grain of salt, as they are not always self-consistent.

For example - if you do not move your elbow at all during the stroke, your grip hand will move in an approximately semicircular arc. This means that the hand is swinging up and down as well as forward and back. Your tip will therefore move up and down as well as forward and back. If your forearm was approximately vertical at cueball address, then this is more or less the "highest" point in the stroke for your tip. Following through past impact will naturally result in the tip dipping lower because the grip hand will be rising.

Some BCA instructors point out that you should "finish on the cloth" as a reminder to not move your elbow. I think some might even suggest that you finish with your grip hand against your chest. This, of course, would be a matter of personal stance or physiology - I suspect the "chest finishers" are either chubby or very low in the stance. Find what works for you, within a general envelope of reasonable technique. If you need help finding this, get the help from someone who doesn't just say "do it like me".

Some of us sacrilegious nonconformists might even suggest that a small elbow drop at the finish of the stroke, while a more complex motion, might still be a more natural follow-through /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan

Cornerman
01-01-2006, 06:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Drop1:</font><hr> I watched a few videos of Dr.Dave demonstrate how to draw the cue ball back. It seemed at the end of his stroke,after shooting, the tip of his cue was slightly down. I always hear level,and follow through,and always shot each shot the same. Is the draw shot different? <hr /></blockquote>

I feel for you. I hate when people say "level" because it's misleading.

This is an instructors response, which is both a breath of fresh air, and a confirmation of the frustration I've felt over the past several years trying to get people off the "level stroke" BS.

Cane Talks on the 'Level' (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=213498&amp;page =1&amp;view=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;vc=1)

Fred

pooltchr
01-01-2006, 07:33 AM
I agree that Bob has done a great job of clearing up what is meant by "level".
Tom Simpson's column in the Jan 06 issue of BD has a great picture of Allison in mid stroke. It's a time-lapse photo and you can see her cue is elevated about 5 degrees. But what is really telling is that you can see there is movement in her grip hand and movement of the cue, both in a forward straight path. There is NO OTHER MOVEMENT seen in the picture. I don't think anyone will disagree that she has some of the best fundamentals in the game. No elbow movement...no head movement, just a simple motion that propels the cue in a nearly perfect straight path.
If you are looking for what makes up a good stroke, this article is a very good read.
JMHO
Steve

randyg
01-01-2006, 07:37 AM
DROP1: There is only one place (time) where your cue stick should be level.....At contact

In a perfect game there should be no difference in the follow, stop or draw stroke. They are all the same forward movement...........randyg

randyg
01-01-2006, 07:43 AM
Great post pooltchr....SPF-randyg

Billy_Bob
01-01-2006, 09:48 AM
When I teach a beginner to draw the cue ball, I tell them to follow through and leave the tip of their cue about 6 inches past where the cue ball is, and to leave the tip touching the cloth.

Sometimes they leave it up in the air and don't get any draw. But when (after about 10 tries) they can do what I say, follow through and leave the tip of the cue touching the cloth 6 inches past where the cue ball is, then they begin to get draw.

For draw practice, use a srtiped ball instead of the cue ball. Then you can see it rotating backwards when you get draw.

Practice with cue ball (striped ball) 1 diamond away from object ball. Then shoot about 10 draw shots a day. After a few months, you will see quite a bit of improvement.

CHALK BEFORE EVERY DRAW SHOT! Especially around the sides of the tip. This is the part of the tip which contacts the CB for draw. Make sure there are no black spots on tip - hold under light and rotate. Use sandpaper shaper to resurface tip if it is not holding chalk.

Another thing to practice is shooting a striped ball with draw all the way down table. You can see it initially rotating backwards, then begin to slide, then begin a forward roll. Try to get it to roll backwards all the way to the end of the table. Not easy. This is why a long distance between the CB and OB will be difficult to get draw, but easier for a short distance.

Other good advice for draw shots is to "slow down"! You can get draw with a slow shot. Just follow through.

I've been practicing about 6 draw shots a day as part of my daily warm-up for several years now. The first ball is stun, 2nd 1/2 diamond draw back, 3rd 1 diamond draw back, etc. last ball full table length draw back. Anyway I'm getting to be quite good at drawing back a specific distance.