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A_LOTA_NOTA
01-03-2006, 11:09 AM
Should you just get help when you feel your game has hit a wall, or would it be better to work with someone 1hr every day, every week, every two week, every month etc?

Billy_Bob
01-03-2006, 02:59 PM
If I had the money, I would like to have a good instructor watching me play every day (and smacking me upside the head every time I do something I shouldn't). I guess that would be more like a coach though.

Sometimes I play with (or in front of) top players and they have been kind enough to tell me if I am doing something I shouldn't.

Other people can see what I'm doing right/wrong, I can't.

One time I heard a railbird say "he can leave the cue ball anywhere he wants at will". Well this just about cracked me up laughing, I was just learning how to leave position for my next shot and was having quite a difficult time doing so.

So just any old observer might not be very accurate with their observations/comments.

Bob_Jewett
01-03-2006, 04:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote A_LOTA_NOTA:</font><hr> Should you just get help when you feel your game has hit a wall, or would it be better to work with someone 1hr every day, every week, every two week, every month etc? <hr /></blockquote>
It depends on what the lessons give you. I have a friend who visited a shrink once or twice a week for years, maybe decades. I came to the conclusion he was going for the conversation rather than any direct psychological benefit, since I didn't notice any external change. In a recent article in Billiards Digest, I wrote of my experiences on both ends of the student/teacher connection. Look at the questions at the end of that article. If you take a lesson and can't answer those questions well, you didn't get anythnig from the lesson, except maybe conversation. Here's the article:

http://www.sfbilliards.com/articles/2005-09.pdf

Scott Lee
01-04-2006, 12:15 AM
A_LOTA_NOTA...I wrote this on another post, but it's accurate here too. I think you should take another lesson when you can effectively master what you wanted to learn in the last lesson. If you didn't invest the time and effort to really excel at what you needed to learn the first time, it's kind of futile to expect to be able to add additional knowledge, and expect to gain much from it. Learning to play better, imo, is a stairstep process. You learn something well initially, that is needed to add something else. Ex.: a + b = c; a + b + c = d, etc. As you master each part, and add new information, your overall game improves, and should become more consistent each time. Confidence and proper practice play large roles in each person's individual rate of improvement. jmo

Scott Lee

SpiderMan
01-04-2006, 02:07 PM
Bob,

Can you describe the "European" bridge variation, or link to a picture of you making it? In what situations does it appear to excel?

Spiderman

Bob_Jewett
01-04-2006, 03:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Bob,

Can you describe the "European" bridge variation, or link to a picture of you making it? In what situations does it appear to excel?

Spiderman <hr /></blockquote>
Make a standard fist bridge, which often puts the tip too low, and gradually edge your middle finger under your thumb to elevate it. (It's slightly different from that, but that's pretty close.) It gets a very precise positioning of the tip for partial draw without changing the elevation of the stick and without much forcing of the fingers to get a flat bridge. Hoppe shows a different "variable draw" bridge in his book.