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View Full Version : Water Under Pool Table, ADVICE NEEDED PRONTO!



Sid_Vicious
01-07-2006, 08:18 AM
I had a flood from a water heater during the night and the water extraction people will be another hour and a half getting here, water throughout most all of the entire house.. They asked if anything needs elevating and I mentioned a pool table but I am wondering if I can trust them to lift it properly without twisting the slate bed. Any advice will be greatly appreciated. Btw, it is sitting on catpet.

Sid

iacas
01-07-2006, 08:26 AM
I don't think you can really twist slate much. You'd have to have it re-leveled anyway.

Wouldn't your homeowner's policy cover a replacement?

Deeman3
01-07-2006, 09:11 AM
Sid,

You can't twist slate but you can sure crack it. If the edges are butted up together, they will cause crumbling of the edges. As long as the table is lifted by the main support beams on the sides, I don't think it will be much of an issue. As well, if the water doesn't get too high, an inch of so, it probably won't even effect the table. If it gets in contact with the wood, it may "wick" up the legs a bit and discolor the lower portion of them.

You might help if you take some plasic wrap and wrap the bottom of the legs starting at the bottom and then wrap the bottom off tight with some duct tape.

deeman

wolfdancer
01-07-2006, 09:52 AM
Sid, too late now but we safely lifted tables by raising one end at a time....placing a 2x4 wedges under it then on to the other end....until we could put some dollies we had made, under the legs.I've probably moved a hundred tables around like this without damage.

JPB
01-07-2006, 10:04 AM
Recently had a basement flood myself. I did not trust the otherwise excellent Servicemaster people with moving the table, and to their credit they knew they shouldn't try. We had it dried out as well as we could without moving the table, then I had table guys come and deal with the table. Had to take it down. At least it is a good excuse for new cloth.

Candyman
01-07-2006, 10:36 AM
Shop wet vacs work great if you still have water. If no wet vac, a carpet cleaner can be rented at a food store.

Sid_Vicious
01-07-2006, 11:10 AM
Work in progress. I had one of the Service Master guys help me lift the table at the ends and placed 2x4s under each. Now I'm wondering whether they'll really do as they stated...remove the pad from underneath for analysis. IMO, since it is clean water, it should be fine just to suck out the water, run the fans and assess any damage to personal items. The list they gave of services was very intensive, and IF my insurance company plays hardball, I could get stuck with quite a bill. The reason I say that is due to the fact that a friend and myself replaced this heater about two months ago, no certified contractors involved. I live outside the city but in a small township with a newly developed city council of it's own. I am in a state of mind to talk turkey with the service people and see if the extensive work(pad removal, ets.) might be stalemated until the State Farm adjuster makes his visit next week. If it was to end up being my bill, I'd cut them loose after the water extraction. The protocol in place could get me though. Btw, the service master people did not suggets it was a problem being that I did the install myself, but I'm just thinking ahead just in case. Ideas? Thanks...sid

JPB
01-07-2006, 11:15 AM
I doubt the self installed thing is going to hang you up. Unfortunately ours was outside water from drainage and thus no coverage. Oh well. Anyway, read your policy. When our water heater flooded a room in our old house insurance covered it. Disclaimer: Not licensed to practice law in your state, not giving legal advice, not an expert on your homeowners policy etc.... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Sid_Vicious
01-07-2006, 01:10 PM
Thanks, I used my wet vac for the first time, DANG a linoleum floor sure pools a lot of water! Anyway the service people did sort of a drying job but there's still alot of soggy spots. I may get a remodeling job on the house out of this in the end. Got to look at the positive side...sid~~~not looking forward to sleeping with the big fans humming for 3 days /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif

heater451
01-07-2006, 01:38 PM
Depending on the relative humidity, it might be worth lookin into some dehumidification too. I know large units are expensive, but you might be able to rent one. At the very least, several buckets of "Damp-Rid" could be of use.

I'm trying to think 'anti-mold', but it may not be an issue for you at all.



============================

JPB
01-07-2006, 02:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote heater451:</font><hr> Depending on the relative humidity, it might be worth lookin into some dehumidification too. I know large units are expensive, but you might be able to rent one. At the very least, several buckets of "Damp-Rid" could be of use.

I'm trying to think 'anti-mold', but it may not be an issue for you at all.



============================ <hr /></blockquote>


Servicemaster has these and used it along with the fans in ours recently.

Drop1
01-07-2006, 02:08 PM
Had a simular problem in Los Angeles,pipe broke on work my Son and I had done. All State was great. It could have been the agent,but we got no hassle. They cut us a check for $8,400

Sid_Vicious
01-07-2006, 05:32 PM
I have industrial dehumidifiers and fans blaring as we speak...oughta be fun night's sleep for sure! The Service Master people were here from 1100-1830, carpet topsy turvy, pool table now sitting 90degrees and on cement, just a pure mess is all I can say. Ol sid ain't busted his hump like today since he don't know when. Anyway, BIG-BIG-BIG THANKS, to everyone! Now, if I can at least steal a couple of hours of pool in at town tomorrow, maybe, maybe not. SM is coming back at noon and my yard is still littered with "my stuff". Oh just to make this pool related, my Stealth jumper split at the knob end, and I'm not sure about all of my shaftwood that got wet. I hairdryer'd it all first thing upon finding the flood, so who knows. My cue rack sat nearly flush with the floor, OOPS..sid

Candyman
01-07-2006, 05:36 PM
I love your optimism on the remodel job. No need in crying over spilled milk, uh spilled water. At least, you had your priorities right...save the pool table, to hell with the women and children. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Sid_Vicious
01-07-2006, 05:47 PM
"At least, you had your priorities right"

Fits the thread we had a while back, "You might be addicted to pool if..." Grabbed the cues, cases, and hair dryr'd the wet wood, THEN shut the water main off. I'm sick and need counceling! sid

JPB
01-07-2006, 11:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> "At least, you had your priorities right"

Fits the thread we had a while back, "You might be addicted to pool if..." Grabbed the cues, cases, and hair dryr'd the wet wood, THEN shut the water main off. I'm sick and need counceling! sid <hr /></blockquote>

Yep, as soon as my wife noticed the flooding and asked for help the scruggs was upstairs out of harm's way. Then I helped. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif Fortunately that and my other cues escaped injury. I will be keeping them above floor level from now on tho.

jtlabs
01-08-2006, 09:23 PM
Sid, as a flood restoration tech I can assure you it is important to check under the carpet for mold and mildew that may have developed.
If water is trapped there you can be sure that some mold has or will grow there. They may be able to dry it out properly from above w/ dehumidifiers and huge fans, but chances are there going to have to rip up the carpet. It is a lot of cash so hopefully your insurance can cover it. Good Luck.

Regards,
Jay

FastJoey
01-09-2006, 12:56 AM
Sid: You didn't state how deep was the water ?? keep those dehumidifiers on at least 4 days.....