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moblsv
01-08-2006, 11:18 AM
Does anybody here keep up on the HD TV technology? I recently moved my old big heavy Sony XBR HDTV out of the pool room to another part of the house and now I can't watch HD Football while practicing pool. I'm sure you can see the dilemma here :-) I'm not sure if I need a flat wall mount type but I'm leaning that way. Any suggestions concerning brand, Plasma, LCD, DLP?

Sid_Vicious
01-08-2006, 11:48 AM
I'll be interested in hearing your responses. I have been followed the market for a while and found a few things out. Firstly, the DLP if a nice system, a few friends bought them. Plasma bothers me in that many talk about a 5 year life time and edge hazing issues, don't know the reality of that but I keep hearing it. The DLP's light source lifetime has been improved greatly so before you'd need one, I'm sure the price of $200 will come down. Actually the DLP technology is changing from a light to a different type of system, digital feed I believe. One thing I have learned in all my studies is that the HDTVs using tubes actually produce a superior picture, plus they are cheaper each day. They are heavy, deep suckers though but amazing. I nearly bought a 32" Sony tube HDTV I found on a one day sale for $750 delivered but didn't. Oh well.

I will most likely settle for one of the 61" DLP Samsungs or an equivelent brand, considering the price. The HDTV vs HD ready systems really doesn't matter much to me either but one with a tuner is preferred given the price is sweet. I can get HD off air but I'm not geared yet for the cable/satellite(plus I'm cheap until more high def programming is available and affordable.)

My entertainment stand was ruined in yesterday's flood so I will be getting something is a man-sized TV soon since the job of disconnecting the system is a give. Thanks for posting the thread, I'll follow it closely and pass anything I learn along...sid

wolfdancer
01-08-2006, 12:08 PM
You can get some info over at Cnet.....
Here's one story:
web page (http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6475_7-6400677-1.html)
or check more stories comparing HD,ED LCD,LSD (you don't even need to have a cable hookup)

SnakebyteXX
01-08-2006, 05:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote moblsv:</font><hr> Does anybody here keep up on the HD TV technology? I recently moved my old big heavy Sony XBR HDTV out of the pool room to another part of the house and now I can't watch HD Football while practicing pool. I'm sure you can see the dilemma here :-) I'm not sure if I need a flat wall mount type but I'm leaning that way. Any suggestions concerning brand, Plasma, LCD, DLP? <hr /></blockquote>

I bought a couple of them just before Christmas. A 40" Sony LCD flat panel (KDL-V40XBR1) 'Bravia' for my den and a 52" Mitsubishi DLP from Costco for the living room/pool room.

Both TV's have extraordinary picture quality particularly in HiDef mode. I've spent more time watching the Sony than I have the Mits but that's because I spend more time in the den/office. Drawbacks to DLP technology are relatively short bulb life and they are slow to warm up when turned on (takes several minutes before a picture appears. However they offer the biggest bang for the buck at this point in time. Meaning that you can get a bigger TV for less money than you would spend on either LCD or Plasma.

LCD is the newer technology and therefore the fewest sets have been made and sold. So the cost is significantly higher and truly large screen sets (over 50") are still priced in the stratosphere.

The 52" Mits. cost just over half as much as the 40" Sony. On the other hand, aside from the prospective future bulb replacement issue the DLP unit is projection based and way bigger, heavier, and bulkier than the flat panel LCD. I have a pretty good sized living room so the size of the DLP unit wasn't a real big problem. OTOH: The flat panel fit perfectly into my smaller den/office and because it's flat panel LCD I can also connect it to my PC network and have it double as a PC monitor.

I'm a Comcast cable subscriber so the first thing I had to do in order to get a HiDef signal was change out my pre-existing cable boxes for their HiDef units (an extra five bucks a month for the first one and ten bucks a month for the second one). Then, to my dismay, I discovered that my trusty TIVO couldn't record in HiDef. So... it was back to the Comcast store to trade in my HiDef cable boxes for the even more expensive HiDef with built in DVR boxes (a total increase in cost of about twenty-five bucks a month for two units).

Compared to my cherished TIVO, Comcast's DVR's are still quite rudimentary. Their interface is not intuitive,(read that: they're a pain in the butt and unnecessarily hard to use). At this point in time they have very limited recording capacity (can only record 15 hours of HiDef TV) and the only good thing I can say for them is that they have dual tuners so you can record one program while watching another. I've been searching the Net for info on how to hack the box to throw in a couple of larger hard drives but haven't found anything yet.

OTOH: TIVO programming is written in Linux and the company has had an open door policy as far as hacking goes since they first started. This basically means that with a little effort you can soup up a TIVO with extra-large replacement hard drives and dramatically increase your recording capacity. My den Tivo can record over three hundred hours of TV before I have to delete anything - which means that I'm WAY spoiled when it comes to DVR's and what I'm used to having them do. I'm hoping that TIVO will offer a HiDef alternative and maybe even one with a dual tuner. When that time comes - I'll bail on the Comcast DVR's in a heartbeat.

The other important consideration re: HiDef TV is that it's still in it's early stages. Reminds me of when I was a kid and we could only get three channels. There really isn't a butt load of HiDef stuff available as of yet. Comcast offers ABC - NBC - CBS - ONE HBO channel and ONE Showtime Channel and a couple of others that I don't subscribe to. However, once you start watching HiDef TV regular TV quickly loses its appeal.

Hope this helps.

Snake

eg8r
01-09-2006, 06:33 AM
This is probably exactly what you are looking for...

http://www.engadget.com/media/2006/01/samsung_102.jpg

I don't really feel you are going to notice a lot of the differences between the different technologies (LCD, plasma, DLP) unless you put an LCD, DLP, and Plasma (same quality of TV just different technology) right next to each other. Once it is in your home, you tend to forget what you saw on the other TVs anyways. From what I have read, LCD is better for sports in relation to DLP (which would be better for movies) however I personally cannot tell a difference. I like very large TVs so plasma really is not an option ($$$) just yet. However in the 42 in and down Plasma's have become real competitive.

When I was looking for a TV, I was looking for a TV that was very bright. I think sports looked better on an LCD tv when it was sitting next to a DLP playing the same video feed. I did get a chance to fool with the video settings to make sure they were not intentionally making the LCD more bright just to move it off the shelves. Ultimately, though, I ended up going with a DLP because it had more options in the back. It had 2 HDMI inputs which was important to me as I have a digital cable box with HDMI out and I have a DVD player with HDMI out. The LCDs that I was looking at only had one HDMI input.

eg8r

moblsv
01-09-2006, 07:23 AM
Yup, that's the one.

Everybody, thanks for the input. I think I will probably move the 34" back to the pool room and get a big LCD or DLP from Costco for the living room. Since the technology is sure to change again within a couple years I will probably worry more about price than anything else. I paid something like $3600 for my current 34" Sony about three years ago, now I can get something similar for $1200ish. I hate to go overboard with the best and end up with it being just another average, overpriced set next year.

eg8r
01-09-2006, 12:00 PM
[ QUOTE ]
I hate to go overboard with the best and end up with it being just another average, overpriced set next year. <hr /></blockquote> Well, I am not going to bash one product or another, but you will always pay too much for a Sony. They do make nice TVs but the name is not justification for the extra dollar amount (and that is usually all it is). You might be pleasantly surprised to find out that the no-name TV on the shelf for one-third less is the actual manufacturer for those name brand sets. There are only a handful of mfgs out there making LCD TVs however there are many hundred different brands being sold.

eg8r

nAz
01-09-2006, 01:10 PM
Well here is a little more info to confuse you with /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif if your going with LCD be sure to get one no larger then 40in. the picture does not look as good when they get larger and be sure it has a hi contrast level say 1000:1.
anything bigger i'd suggest a DLP set be sure it has the new dlp chip the mustang darkchip is top of the line. it is a little pricy but the picture is awesome. also remember no matter what set you go with HD ready is not the same as HD built in, if you get one HD ready you will need to pay around $400 bucks for a converter. check out this site if you need more info... http://www.projectorcentral.com/