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View Full Version : Tip shape and Break Shaft



dareads
01-13-2006, 05:42 AM
I was wondering if you think a dime radius or a nickel radius tip would be better for a not very good player.

Also, is there someone who makes or can make a shaft for a break cue? I am about to get a new cue and would like to get a shaft for my old cue so I can use it for breaking. Would a shaft be necessary or could I just put a hard/phenolic tip on it? Thanks.

Snapshot9
01-13-2006, 05:56 AM
Tip shape for a playing cue? I would recommend
a nickel shape for overall consistency.
A custom made shaft can run anywhere from
$80-$190. I bought a J&J Break/Jump cue with
14mm shaft and tip off Ebay. It has a phenolic
1/2" ferrule and tip. It is very solid when
breaking. They can be had for $70 new (Erikleecues.com),
or for about $50-60 on Ebay (shipping included).
Personally, I rate the cue at about a $225 value,
even though it only cost me $45 total (shipping included).

Rich R.
01-13-2006, 07:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dareads:</font><hr> I am about to get a new cue and would like to get a shaft for my old cue so I can use it for breaking. Would a shaft be necessary or could I just put a hard/phenolic tip on it? Thanks. <hr /></blockquote>
By your questions, I am going to assume you are not an advanced player. I hope I am not wrong.
IMHO, you should just get a hard tip, on the existing shaft, and use it for breaking. You may want to stay away from the phenolic tips, until you get a little more experienced, as it is harder to control the cue ball with those tips. A hard leather tip should be very good for your purposes.

dareads
01-13-2006, 08:10 AM
You are not wrong in assuming I am not very good. I am admittedly buying to much cue so that I have something to grow into. I want to talk to Bob Jewett at SF Billiards and arrange to take some lessons. I have been out of the game for over 10 years and would like to get back to a level I am happy with. Thanks for the advice.

supergreenman
01-13-2006, 08:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr>
By your questions, I am going to assume you are not an advanced player. I hope I am not wrong.
IMHO, you should just get a hard tip, on the existing shaft, and use it for breaking. You may want to stay away from the phenolic tips, until you get a little more experienced, as it is harder to control the cue ball with those tips. A hard leather tip should be very good for your purposes. <hr /></blockquote>

I concur with Rich.

James

Billy_Bob
01-13-2006, 11:39 AM
I feel it is best to always play with the same exact cue. Same weight, same brand tip, same hardness of tip, same shape on tip.

FYI - I have a 19.5 oz cue with a dime shaped Moori Q (hard) tip which I keep dime shaped using a sandpaper shaping tool.

My 17.5 oz breaking cue has a quarter shaped Tiger break/jump tip (very very hard).

Scott Lee
01-13-2006, 12:30 PM
dareads...Good idea to seek out Bob Jewett. If he's unavailable, his associate Joseph Mejia is another good choice! Best of luck. Taking lessons will put you right back on your old game, and give you new information to rise above your old level, quickly and (hopefully) permanently.
BTW, the suggestion to put a hard tip on your old cue is a good one. No need to spend additional money on another cue.
Put it towards an additional lesson first, imo!

Scott Lee

dareads
01-13-2006, 12:40 PM
I wanted to start by taking their basics course. I just wanted to start over at ground zero and hopefully unlearn any bad habits that I have developed. I'll talk to the repair guy at the local shop and have him put a hard tip on my old cue. Thank you all for the advice.

Billy_Bob
01-13-2006, 12:41 PM
Yes and find out the brand of tip and hardness of tip if someone else is installing it. Then you can get the same tip installed in the future.

Amazing how many players have no idea what brand or hardness of tip is installed on their cue...